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Maryland’s Underserved Urban Communities to Receive $7.7 million for Heat Island Effect-Reducing Trees

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Thirty-six underserved urban communities across Maryland are about to plant 40,000 new trees, thanks to a new effort created by the Maryland General Assembly’s Tree Solutions Now Act of 2021 and state resources provided through the Chesapeake Bay Trust (the Trust). The Act calls for five million trees to be planted across Maryland by 2031, with 500,000 of them targeted to urban, underserved areas. The Trust, the distributer of funds from the Chesapeake vehicle license plate program and other sources, has long empowered local urban communities through grant-making and was tapped in the Act to serve as the administrator of the urban component.

Urban trees have significant benefits to human health, climate, the economy, and the environment. Yet some urban communities are severely lacking in greening, contributing to heat island effect,
exacerbating asthma and other health issues, and reducing quality of life. Providing resources through ground-up, community-based grants empowers people to own this piece of community improvement, leading to sustainability.

“This urban greening effort will help address both global climate change as well as environmental justice including inequities in historically disenfranchised communities,” said Senator Paul Pinsky, a sponsor of the legislation. “This work will create lasting green improvements and help to mitigate the harmful effects of climate change with every tree planted.”

Ninety million dollars per year over nine years will be distributed by the Trust to communities, neighborhoods, civic groups, schools, and others who commit to planting trees in underserved regions as defined in the legislation. Funding is reserved for urban census tracts with low median household income levels, with high unemployment, or were historically red-lined or for public housing projects.

“We are thrilled to have been able to provide the resources for this work,” said Delegate Dana Stein, another key sponsor of the legislation. “All communities deserve to have green spaces and trees to help improve quality of life.”

Studies show that trees planted in urban communities improve the physical and mental health of people within their proximity, and that increasing urban canopy can reduce asthma and respiratory-related emergencies during heat wave-related events in under-treed areas. For these reasons, many urban communities have adopted urban tree canopy goals, including Baltimore City, which has set a goal of 40% canopy by 2037.

Communities will begin planting trees this fall, concentrating on areas such as vacant lots or streets
where native trees and resources are scarce. These trees will help to reduce the urban heat island effect, filter polluted stormwater, mitigate the effect of carbon emissions, reduce energy consumption and therefore energy bills, and improve air quality. Increasing tree quantity and quality in urban areas is a cost-effective way to strengthen the health of the Chesapeake Bay, provide urban wildlife habitat, help mitigate flooding issues, and stimulate local green jobs markets enabling families to work where they live and play.

“Witnessing the work of these communities and organizations as they restore and protect their neighborhoods is a perfect reminder of the symbiotic relationship between the health of our local neighborhoods and the health of our environment and waterways.” said Jana Davis, president of the Chesapeake Bay Trust.

 

View Full Press Release (includes a list of the 36 awarded projects)

2022-2023 Chesapeake Conservation Corps Class Announced

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2022-2023 Chesapeake Conservation Corps Class Announced

 

(Annapolis, MD) August 16,2022The Chesapeake Bay Trust, with the support of the Maryland Chesapeake Bay license plate as well as other sources, proudly introduces a new class of Chesapeake Conservation Corps members. The Chesapeake Conservation Corps was created with the purpose of fostering onsite training and educational opportunities for young adults interested in exploring their environmental passions in a professional space.  During their time in the Conservation Corps, members are matched with both non-profit and government host organizations and receive hands-on guidance aimed at improving local communities and protecting natural resources. Members of the Corps are given a one-year-stipend and other support by the Chesapeake Bay Trust during their time in the Corps.

“For more than a decade, the Chesapeake Conservation Corps has given young people the knowledge and skills they need to be the conservation leaders of tomorrow,” said Senator Van Hollen. “Congress has just taken a bold step to confront the accelerating harm of climate change and we are counting on graduates of the Corps to play a key role in implementing the provisions of this bill to better protect the Chesapeake Bay, our environment, and our planet. I want to congratulate this year’s graduates and the incoming class, and I look forward to seeing what they accomplish.”

The Corps has become a premier launching pad for green careers and a reliable resource for environmentally focused organizations who are recruiting the next generation of environmental professionals.  Over 300 alums have become leaders in the environmental movement as well as engaged individuals bringing a stewardship ethic to non-environmental careers.  Many of them are hired by their host organizations following their years of service.

“We applaud these young people embarking on this incredible journey today,” said Senator Sarah Elfreth, who has been appointed by the Maryland Senate President to serve on the Corps Advisory Board. “Their passion for protecting and restoring our region’s natural resources will affect so many communities and bring measurable improvements in our environment and neighborhoods.”

Today, 33 Corps members met their host organizations to learn more about their job responsibilities for the upcoming year.  During their year of service, Corps members will gain valuable on-the-job experience as they work to advance environmental conservation, K-12 education, energy efficiency programs and other climate resiliency goals, sustainable agriculture practices, and a host of other environmentally focused initiatives.

“I am so honored to serve on the Corps Advisory Board with Senator Elfreth. I have been fortunate to see this program grow over time, and the legislature continue to invest in it, including just this last session,” said Delegate Anne Healey, referring to the expansion of the Corps to further focus on climate and environmental justice via the Climate Solutions Act of 2022.

Funds for the program are provided by the Chesapeake Bay Trust, which is supported by the Chesapeake Bay vehicular license plate program (the “bay plate”) and other sources; the Maryland Department of Natural Resources; the U.S. National Park Service; and Baltimore Gas and Electric (BGE); among others.

“The Chesapeake Conservation Corps program is an important investment for us with our Chesapeake Gateways funding, helping accomplish our Chesapeake awareness, engagement, and access goals said Wendy O’Sullivan, Superintendent of the National Park Service Chesapeake Bay Office. “The Corps members hard work and enthusiasm is a tremendous asset for our Chesapeake Gateways partner host sites.”

“BGE is committed to investing strategically to develop the workforce in our region.  Successful and innovative programs like the Corps prepare our youth for meaningful jobs in many different sectors in ways that add long-term value for the participants, our communities, and companies like ours” said Alex Núñez, Senior Vice President of BGE’s Governmental, Regulatory, and External Affairs and Chesapeake Bay Trust Trustee.

During the year, Corps participants work directly with their host organizations while also receiving extensive job trainings hosted by the Chesapeake Bay Trust as well as other service-learning opportunities including grant writing and project management.

“We believe in ripple effects here at the Trust,” said Dr. Jana Davis, president of the Chesapeake Bay Trust. “These amazing Corps members will insert themselves in communities across our region, bringing awareness of natural resources and on-the-ground work that affect layers and layers of people, improving not just the environment, but local economies, neighborhoods, and even human health as people benefit from using the outdoors.”

The 33 selected participants will work in Anne Arundel, Calvert, Howard, Kent, Montgomery, Prince George’s, Talbot, Worcester Counties and Baltimore City.

About the Chesapeake Bay Trust

The Chesapeake Bay Trust (www.cbtrust.org) envisions a restored and protected Chesapeake Bay watershed and other natural resources in our area, from the Coastal Bays to the Chesapeake to the Youghiogheny River. We uniquely empower local community-based groups on the ground with the resources they need to take on a meaningful and measurable role in restoring forests, streams, rivers, bays, wildlife, and more in their own communities. Every year, the Trust empowers about 400 groups by providing grants and technical assistance to accomplish environmental education, community outreach, and local watershed restoration projects. The Trust is supported by the sale of the Chesapeake Bay license plate; donations to the Chesapeake Bay and Endangered Species Fund on the Maryland State income tax form; donations made by hunters, fishers, and boaters in the Maryland online natural resource licensing system; donations from individuals and corporations; and partnerships with private foundations and federal, state, and local governments. The Trust has received the highest rating from Charity Navigator for over two decades.  On average, 90% of the Trust’s expenditures are directed to its restoration and education programs.

Chesapeake Conservations Corps 2022-2023 Corps Member Placements

Ashley Barnes, ECO City Farms
Riverdale, Prince George’s County

Ashley will serve her year at ECO City Farms where she will cultivate sustainably grown food; educate local youth and families about food, health, and the environment; and engage in hands‐on trainings and permaculture projects on the farm. Ashley has a degree in Environmental Studies from Winthrop University. She wants to help serve underrepresented communities and advocate for environmental experiences in these communities. Ashley is also interested in sustainable food, nutrition, and food diversity practices and their impacts on minority communities.

Jack Bayne, National Park Service Fort McHenry
Baltimore City

Jack graduated from McDaniel College with a degree in Environmental Studies. He is passionate about researching the effects of biodiversity loss in our ecosystems. He finds great pride in creating and restoring habitats for wildlife in his local area. During his placement at Fort McHenry, Jack will be assisting in energy conscious restoration and renovation, practicing organic lawncare and landscaping, and planning a 25‐ acre meadow restoration at the Hampton National Historic site.

Margaret “Maggie” Bennett, NOAA Chesapeake Bay Office
Annapolis, Anne Arundel County

During her placement at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Chesapeake Bay Office, Maggie will support efforts in K‐12 education and early career development to develop and implement comprehensive environmental literacy programs. She will be curating career-oriented programming that provides students with an awareness of career opportunities, career training and the articulation of that programming into green jobs. Maggie brings her experience in providing youth environmental education through summer camp leadership experiences. She also has an interest in GIS mapping and has created an interactive mushroom map as one of her projects.

Eva Blockstein, Anne Arundel County Department of Recreation and Parks Jug Bay Wetlands Sanctuary
Lothian, Anne Arundel County

Eva graduated from Ohio Wesleyan University with a degree in Zoology and a minor in Environmental Studies. Eva is a natural nature lover and aspires to have a career as a naturalist. She has conducted ecological field work in Alaska, where she gained a new perspective and adapted new ways to reduce her environmental footprint. During her year with Jug Bay Wetlands, Eva will be planning, coordinating, and implementing projects to further their outdoor education and stewardship goals. Eva will also develop programs to address climate change.

 Michael Bonnell, Chesapeake Conservancy
Annapolis, Anne Arundel County

Michael first developed a love for nature as a kid doing frequent camping trips. Since then, Michael has nurtured his passion for biology and the natural world through his studies at Rowan University. His desire for service shines through him becoming an Eagle Scout and serving his local community. Michael will be with the Chesapeake Conservancy this year, serving the Chesapeake Conservation Partnership. He will contribute to many cutting-edge policies and programs to attract investments in environmental restoration and address historic needs to provide various types of open space in disadvantaged communities.

Julia Boswell, Chesapeake Bay Foundation
Annapolis, Anne Arundel County

Julia will be spending her service year at the Chesapeake Bay Foundation. She will be working in habitat restoration, regenerative agriculture, environmental education, and oyster restoration. Last year, Julia took a week-long trip to the Florida Everglades with a conservation field research expedition. She fell in love with fieldwork and immersing herself in nature. The inspiration provided on this expedition lead her to fully pursue a career in conservation.

Mollie Boyd, National Aquarium in Baltimore
Baltimore City

Mollie grew up in Elkridge, MD and attended school at UNC Wilmington where she majored in Marine Biology and Environmental Science. Mollie says that growing up in the Chesapeake Bay watershed has shaped her love of the outdoors. She brings her experience working in youth environmental education and is also a certified diving instructor. While at the National Aquarium, Mollie will participate in Aquarium conservation efforts including habitat restoration, data collection on urban biodiversity and water quality of Baltimore’s Inner Harbor, community engagement and stewardship activities, and youth education.

Chakya Browning, Towson University Center for STEM Excellence
Baltimore City

Chakya will be working at Towson University Center for STEM Excellence supporting a variety of environmental education initiatives by developing activities and facilitating programs designed to foster a sense of stewardship of the Chesapeake Bay in Maryland’s K‐12 students. Chakya is very passionate about recycling and mitigating the problem that is single-use plastics. She plans to continue to explore environmental stewardship opportunities through her service year with the Corps.

 Morgan Buchanan, Shorerivers
Easton, Talbot County

Morgan grew up in Florida, where she became passionate about water, water quality, and science. Those passions led her to John Hopkins University where she studied Environmental Science, Molecular and Cellular Biology. Morgan’s connection with the Chesapeake Bay strengthened her desire to become a Corps Member. Now with ShoreRivers, she will be doing SAV and water quality monitoring along the Eastern Shore and supporting environmental education programs.

Natalie Buscemi, Howard County Office of Community Sustainability
Ellicott City, Howard County

Natalie will be working with the Howard County Office of Sustainability to develop new ideas, programs, and strategies to advance climate action and energy conservation. She will be conducting outreach and engaging the public at events and workshops. Natalie enjoys working with communities to improve environmental impacts and influence behavioral change. She is also keen on biodiversity and how its loss impacts our ecosystem. Natalie holds a degree in Wildlife and Fisheries from Frostburg State University.

Madeline Daugherty, Howard County Office of Community Sustainability
Ellicott City, Howard County

Madeline came into environmental studies more than halfway through her college career. Even still, she instantly knew this was the best choice for her. Madeline has interests in stormwater management, green infrastructure, and urban greening. She deeply believes in the influence our environment has on our lives and health. Madeline will be at the Howard County Office of Community Sustainability working on innovative options and solutions for stormwater management in vulnerable communities.

Wanita David, Maryland Environmental Service
Millersville,
Anne Arundel County
Wanita has had a broad and diverse range of experiences in environmental sustainability including research, urban gardening, and solar energy. Ultimately, it was the topic of water pollution that had the deepest impact and sparked her interest in the environment at an early age. Wanita now holds a degree in Biological Engineering from North Carolina A&T State University. She will be working with the Maryland Environmental Service this year, focusing on projects associated with stormwater planning, design, and compliance.

Laura Dennison, Audubon Naturalist Society
Chevy Chase, Montgomery County

Laura was born in Australia and moved to the Eastern Shore of Maryland at an early age. Laura said being a child of two marine scientist led to her love of nature and traveling. She has a degree in Environmental Studies from St Mary’s College of Maryland. Laura hopes that the Corps will help channel her broad environmental interests into a focused career. While working with the Audubon Naturalist Society Laura will be supporting restoration efforts, conducting habitat surveys, and wildlife monitoring.  She will also be engaging the public on issues of conservation and environmental quality in the region.

Caroline Emeric, National Park Service Fort McHenry
Baltimore City

Caroline will be spending her service year working with the National Park Service at Fort McHenry. She will be implementing climate change education, developing interpretative signage, and experimenting with mapping and GIS. Caroline is an avid outdoorswoman with extensive experience hiking, backpacking, and rock climbing. She studied Biology at College of William and Mary and frequently draws inspiration from the rich local habitat and diversity of species in the Chesapeake Bay region.

Peter Fath, The Community Ecology Institute
Columbia, Howard County

Peter holds degrees in Geographical Sciences from University of Maryland College Park. While in school, Peter took classes focused on the Chesapeake Bay’s ecosystem where he learned about the interactions between science and public policy. This experience brought him closer to his passion to work in outreach and education programming, specifically, food and waste behavior. Peter will be serving at The Community Ecology Institute. Here he will support community-based programs that weave together educational, health, equity, and environmental practices and outcomes. He will also be engaging the public through community garden and restoration initiatives.

Johanna Guardadoo, Maryland Department of Natural Resources: Chesapeake & Coastal Service
Annapolis, Anne Arundel County

Johanna graduated from Roger Williams University with a degree in International Relations. Being a first-generation student and college graduate led her to think about environmental issues on a global scale. As a result, Johanna developed a passion for studying the impacts of climate change on ice caps and glaciers and that influence on rising sea levels across the world. This year she will be working with Maryland DNR to support science communication, engagement, and outreach. She will also be involved in direct community engagement on complex issues supporting environmental education and climate communications.

Sushanth Gupta, Maryland Department of Natural Resources
Annapolis, Anne Arundel County

Sushanth found a passion for sustainable agriculture volunteering at the University of Maryland Terp Farm after changing his major to Agricultural and Resource Economics. Since his studies, Sushanth has decided to focus his efforts on helping to execute local change. He believes small scale work can be very impactful and often easier to implement and make a difference. Sushanth will be serving with Maryland DNR assisting with mussel restoration initiatives. He will conduct field surveys, collect data, help with the operation of hatchery facilities, and develop new outreach material to highlight conservation efforts for stakeholders.

Owen Keys, Anne Arundel Community College
Annapolis, Anne Arundel County

Owen will be completing his service year at Anne Arundel Community College working at the Environmental Center. He will be conducting water quality monitoring; participating in field and laboratory work measuring bacteria and nutrient levels; and conducting horseshoe crab surveys and molecular studies. Owen traces his passion for the natural world to his early childhood interests in crabs, oysters, fishes, and jellyfishes. These early immersions carried Owen to Stevenson University where he studied Environmental Science and Chesapeake Bay Ecology.

Kacie Larsen, Lower Shore Land Trust
Snow Hill, Worcester County

During her placement at Lower Shore Land Trust, Kacie will serve as an Outreach Coordinator and support education, outreach and communications for restoration and land protection activities. She will participate in various restoration activities, including pollinator meadows and rain barrel workshops. Kacie holds a degree in Environmental and Sustainability Studies from University of Utah. She is particularly interested in marine conservation and has spent time in Greece conducting marine mammal research. Kacie is also a certified open water SCUBA instructor.

James Oliver Lee, University of Maryland Environmental Finance Center
College Park, Prince George’s County

James is a well-traveled individual who loves backpacking. Throughout his youth he has spent time in Bulgaria, Switzerland, Colombia, and France. He holds a degree in Political Science and Anthropology from University College Utrecht in the Netherlands. At the University of Maryland Environmental Finance Center, James will work with communities on actions that will contribute to their increased sustainability. He will also develop online course materials and real-world case studies.

Imani Makell, Arlington Echo Outdoor Education Center
Millersville, Anne Arundel County

Imani will be working at Anne Arundel County Public Schools’ Arlington Echo Outdoor Education Center where she will be teaching students and adults about the environment, developing activities and materials to support curriculum, and engaging in ongoing restoration projects while networking with other environmental organizations. Imani is a strong believer in community engagement and its impact on youth. She also has interest in watershed restoration projects.

Grace Mayer, American Chestnut Land Trust
Prince Frederick, Calvert County

Grace holds two degrees in Dance and Geographic Science from James Madison University. During her time in college, Grace was able to find ways to combine her love for creativity with her love for the environment when she involved herself in GIS and cartography. She will spend her year with American Chestnut Land Trust leading volunteer groups in various land management activities including invasive species removal, meadow establishment, hiking trail maintenance, property monitoring, and forest and wildlife diversity surveys.

 Emily O’Connell, Arlington Echo Outdoor Education Center
Millersville, Anne Arundel County

Emily grew up with nature in the mountains of North Carolina. After moving near Baltimore, Emily gained a new perspective on the ecosystem and the effects of human development, climate change, and habitat loss. This perspective led her to pursue a career in wildlife rehabilitation and restoration. During her time at Arlington Echo, she will be teaching students and adults about the environment, developing activities and materials to support curriculum, and engaging in ongoing restoration projects while networking with other environmental organizations.

 Kassandra Patrick, American Chestnut Land Trust
Prince Frederick, Calvert County

During her year Kassandra will manage the daily operations of a one‐acre sustainable agriculture farm and support farm‐related community outreach at the American Chestnut Land Trust. She will also help organize community conservation action groups. Kassandra grew up in rural Pennsylvania, where she developed an early love for the outdoor recreation. She studied Environmental and Sustainability at Cornell University. Kassandra recalls witnessing a catastrophic oil spill on the news and using that experience to drive her into getting involved in water quality research and water pollution mitigation.

Rachel Pitsenberger, The Nature Conservancy
Bethesda, Montgomery County

Rachel’s passion for the environment culminated at Georgetown University, where she received her degree in Biology and minored in Environmental Studies and welcomed the opportunity to explore

classes in ecology, plant biology, and conservation biology. Rachel is also an advocate for equitable access to clean, healthy, and safe environments and outdoor spaces for underserved communities. She will be serving her year at The Nature Conservancy, helping with native plantings, invasive species control, trail maintenance, forest management, and ecological restoration.

Simon Sauvageau, The Community Ecology Institute
Columbia, Howard County

During his year in the Corps Simon will work with The Community Ecology to develop community‐based programs that weave together educational, health, equity, and environmental practices and outcomes. He will also help to support community gardening initiatives. Simon is interested in urban ecology and studied Environmental Science at Franklin & Marshall College in Pennsylvania. Simon served in a leadership role in his sustainable housing community where he learned sustainability reaches far beyond just environmental considerations and must intersect with social and emotional aspects of life to be successful.

Juliana Schifferes, Global Health and Education Projects, Inc.
Riverdale, Prince George’s County

Working with the Global Health and Education Projects this year, Juliana will serve as the Digital Environment Fellow. She will be responsible for digitalizing the outreach, engagement, and education of residents through digital story telling engaging a cross‐generation of signature program participants. Juliana is especially interested in community engagement work within environmental restoration practices. She studied Political Science at the University of Maryland Baltimore County. She hopes the Corps experience will help to propel her into a future Master of Public Administration.

Fana Scott, Washington College Center for Environment & Society
Chestertown, Kent County

Fana grew her passion for adventure and the outdoors by joining the Student Conservation Association in high school and has since been to several locations across the U.S., involving herself in conservation field work. She expanded on this in college, earning a bachelor’s in Biology and Environmental Studies. Fana is also a certified EMT. During her time at Washington College Center for the Environment & Society, she will be conducting migratory bird field studies and planning environmental education programs for students and local community members.

Morgan Shippy, Annapolis Maritime Museum & Park
Annapolis, Anne Arundel County

Morgan earned her bachelor’s degree from Bowie State University in Biology. During her time in college, Morgan learned about how important wetlands are to our local ecosystem in Maryland. This knowledge fuels her passion to preserve wetlands and mitigate destruction of this habitat. She will spend her year with Annapolis Maritime Museum & Park supporting the environmental education department. She will deliver programs to local school-aged youth to establish a sense of stewardship an encourage environmental literacy.

 Matthew Swanton, Annapolis Maritime Museum & Park
Annapolis, Anne Arundel County

Matthew will spend his year in the Corps with Annapolis Maritime Museum & Park. He will be involved in grade school classroom visits, environmental education curricula development, and work with a suite of hands‐on, experiential programs. Matthew earned his degree in Environmental Studies at Washington College. He is passionate about combating litter and completed his Senior Capstone Experience project on the impact of microplastics on soil ecosystems.

Brady Waters, Anne Arundel County Department of Public Works
Annapolis, Anne Arundel County

Brady grew up near the Chesapeake Bay in Deal, Maryland and learned to value and appreciate the natural resources presented to him at an early age. This early appreciation propelled him into an Environmental Studies degree from St. Mary’s College and pursuit of a career in preservation and restoration of the Chesapeake Bay and Maryland’s natural resources. Brady started a fishing club in college furthering his interest in water quality. He will be working with Anne Arundel County Public Works on Education & Outreach, and participate in grants management, restoration project development, water quality monitoring, and watershed modeling and analysis.

Danielle Wendt, National Wildlife Federation
Annapolis, Anne Arundel County

During her year at the National Wildlife Federation, Danielle will help develop and execute new and existing nature‐based projects through a combination of environmental restoration, climate resiliency, community engagement and education work—all with an equity lens. Danielle is a graduate of McDaniel College and earned degrees in English and Environmental Studies. She has found ways to combine the two interests through environmental storytelling and community engagement. Danielle sees her skillset as one that can help her uplift underrepresented voices.

Katerina Whitman, Lower Shore Land Trust
Annapolis, Anne Arundel County

Katerina studied Environmental and Natural Resources with a concentration in Conservation Biology at Clemson University. She is particularly passionate about climate change and its impact on wildlife behavior and habitats. While at Lower Shore Land Trust this year, Katerina will serve as the Restoration Coordinator. She will work on habitat and water quality projects ranging from residential scale, congregation lands, and larger landscape-scale projects. She will also be involved in tree planting and coordinating maintenance and management activities of current LSLT projects.

Just how much is a hospital green space worth?

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NEWS PROVIDED BY
Nature Sacred
First of its kind calculator shows financial impact of nature spaces in mitigating burnout-related costs in hospitals


ANNAPOLIS, MD — In the midst of a quest for measures to address the epidemic of burnout among nurses and physicians, and at the same time, improve patient care, new evidence of the impact of hospital green spaces has emerged. A newly-published paper authored by Sean M. Murphy, PhD, health economist and Associate Professor at Weill Cornell Medical College, reports on the development of a first ever means to calculate the financial impact of usable on-campus green spaces.

The paper was published by Nature Sacred, an organization that supports the creation of contemplative green spaces, with funding support from the Chesapeake Bay Trust, the Maryland Department of Natural Resources, and the United States Environmental Protection Agency.

“While the scientific evidence of nature’s influence on various aspects of health and wellbeing on an individual and community level is well-documented and growing, until now, no one had measured the implications in terms of dollars and cents,” Nature Sacred CEO Alden Stoner said. “This is something many C Suite health care executives have been asking for; now, we have an answer.”

“In short, we knew nature spaces had an outsized impact on individual and community health, now there is evidence that they have an outsized impact on improving the bottom line for healthcare campuses.”

A dynamic companion calculator built using the budget impact tool described in the paper is openly available for any hospital to use. It requires a few key inputs related to nurse and physician employment figures and an estimated budget (figure) for creating and maintaining a green space. The resulting calculation is an estimate of how much the hospital could potentially offset in burnout-related expenses. Two sample scenarios included in the paper illustrate the applicability of the calculator in both a small and large hospital setting.

According to Dr. Murphy, there were three areas where cost-offsets associated with a biophilic intervention would potentially be the greatest: in mitigating turnover, absences and errors among nurses and physicians.

“The science on the value of green spaces to physical and mental human health is clear,” said Jana Davis, president of the Chesapeake Bay Trust.  “This work is key in taking this science to the next step: Evaluating the economic implications of that health impact.  The analysis will encourage institutions to weave green spaces into their campus designs at great return on investment.”

Adam Ortiz, Regional Administrator for EPA Mid-Atlantic Region, too, recognizes the potential impact of the paper and calculator. “Now more than ever, we know just how valuable our hospital and healthcare workers are,” said Ortiz.  “Identifying ways to implement accessible green spaces for them is vital – to alleviate burnout and aiding in their own health and wellness as they continue to care for their patients.  This tool will have far-reaching benefits to the hospital community.”

About Nature Sacred

Nature Sacred exists to inspire, inform and guide communities in the creation of public green spaces—called Sacred Places—designed to improve mental health, unify communities and engender peace. For over 25 years, Nature Sacred has partnered with more than 100 communities across the country to infuse nearby nature into places where healing is often needed most: distressed urban neighborhoods, schools, hospitals, prisons and more. Through a collaborative, community-led process and an evidence-based design model, each Sacred Place is bonded together by a common goal: to reconnect people with nature in ways that foster mindful reflection, restore mental health and strengthen communities. As each community imagines its own space, the design becomes a unique reflection of the community’s culture, story and place—making it inherently sacred to them. Learn about our model, our approach and our Sacred Places: naturesacred.org

About the Chesapeake Bay Trust

The Chesapeake Bay Trust (www.cbtrust.org) envisions a restored and protected Chesapeake Bay watershed and other natural resources. We empower local community-based groups on the ground with the resources they need to take on a meaningful and measurable role in restoring forests, streams, rivers, bays, wildlife, and more in their own communities. Every year, the Trust empowers about 400 groups by providing grants and technical assistance to accomplish environmental education, community outreach, and local watershed restoration projects. The Trust is supported by the sale of the Chesapeake Bay license plate; donations to the Chesapeake Bay and Endangered Species Fund on the Maryland State income tax form; donations made by hunters, fishers, and boaters in the Maryland online natural resource licensing systemdonations from individuals and corporations; and partnerships with private foundations and federal, state, and local governments. The Trust has received the highest rating from Charity Navigator for over two decades.  On average, 90% of the Trust’s expenditures are directed to its restoration and education programs.

Chesapeake Bay Trust Awards – Fiscal Year 2023

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The Chesapeake Bay Trust (Trust) has awarded over $130 million through more than 14,000 awards to ensure cleaner, greener, healthier Chesapeake, Coastal Bays, and Youghiogheny watersheds since 1985. The Trust has a rigorous grant review process: every proposal submitted over $5,000 is sent to members of a Technical Review Committee (TRC) and is reviewed and scored quantitatively by at least three external individuals who are experts in their fields. The Board of Trustees meets 4 times per year to review and approve all TRC recommended proposals. Proposals for $5,000 or less are reviewed by two or more technical experts on the Chesapeake Bay Trust program team. The award list will be updated after each board meeting. Reach out to the designated program officer for more details.

August 2022

Anne Arundel County Community Tree Planting Grant Program

This program provides small community-based grants to help communities and organizations increase the number trees and tree canopy in neighborhoods, parks, and communities. For information about this grant program, click here.

Asbury Broadneck United Methodist Church: for youth to install 56 red maple trees at a historic African American church. This award is supported at $5,000 with $2,500 from this program and $2,500 from the Trust’s Community Engagement and Restoration Mini Grant Program. $5,000.

Carrington Woods Homeowners Association: for the planting of five (5) native trees in the forest conservation area of Carrington Woods in Severn, Maryland. Funding is for the purchase of trees and associated costs for supplies, such as mulch and tree water bags. $2,500.

Tidewater Colony Open Space Association: for native tree planting and invasive species removal in the Tidewater Colony community. $2,500.

Chesapeake Bay Program Goal Implementation Team Project Support Funding Program

This program is a partnership between the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Chesapeake Bay Trust which is designed to invite entities experienced in various aspects of fisheries, watershed science and policy, watershed stewardship, outreach and training, climate resilience, submerged aquatic vegetation (sav), and other watershed issues to submit proposals to advance specific outcomes of the 2014 Chesapeake Bay Watershed Agreement. For more information about this grant program click here.

Calm Waters Group: for the completion of Scope #3: Equitable Grant Funding in the Chesapeake Bay Watershed. $74,500.

Chesapeake Environmental Communications: for completion of Scope #7: A Local Government Guide to the Chesapeake Bay: Phase II. $79,800.

Environmental Policy Innovation Center (fiscal sponsor: Sand County Foundation): for completion of Scope #5: Strategy Development for Innovative Finance of Riparian Forest Buffer Programs. $69,203.

Innovate!, Inc.: for the completion of Scope #1: Chesapeake Healthy Watersheds Assessment 2.0. $84,821.

Skeo Solutions, Inc.: for completion of Scope #10: Updating the Chesapeake Conservation Partnership (CCP) Priority Habitat Dataset of the Chesapeake Conservation Atlas: A Scoping Project. $44,960.

Skeo Solutions, Inc.: for the completion of Scope #2: Partnership-Building and Identification of Collaborative Tidal Marsh Adaptation Projects. $74,977.

Tetra Tech, Inc.: for completion of Scope #12: Data Review and Development of Multi-Metric Stream Health Indicators. $75,000.

The Nature Conservancy: for completion of Scope #4: Updating the Chesapeake Bay Fish Passage Prioritization Tool. $60,651.

University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science: for completion of Scope #9: A Population Simulation Model for Blue Crab Stock Assessment Performance Evaluation. $79,999.

University of Maryland College Park: for completion of Scope #6: Tree Canopy Funding and Policy Roundtable. $64,909.

Community Engagement and Restoration Mini Grant Program

This program is designed to engage Maryland residents in activities that enhance communities, engage residents, and improve natural resources by funding small-scale activities such as tree plantings, rain gardens, and community cleanups, among others. For information about this grant program click here.

IMAAM, Inc.: for a rain garden, webinars, and educational outings to engage Muslim youth and other Mosque members. $4,935.

Islamic Community Center of Laurel: for a pollinator garden, education on native plants, and a nature outing at Riverfront Park. $4,734.

MedStar Good Samaritan Hospital: for a healing pollinator garden in a courtyard accessible to staff, patients, and visitors. $4,964.

Saint Camillus Catholic Church: for two hillside plantings to reduce stormwater runoff and engage the church community in faith-based stewardship. $4,985.

St. Mark’s United Methodist Church: for nature walks and native plant giveaways, including at the Emancipation Day Diabetes 5K race. $4,640.

D.C. Donation and Reuse: Zero Waste Act Grant Program

This program is a partnership between the Chesapeake Bay Trust and the District of Columbia Department of Energy and Environment which seeks to increase diversion of reusable material, through programs, services, outreach, and education. The goals of this program are to provide funding to projects that reduce needless waste and increase diversion of reusable material, including edible food, from landfills and incineration through donation or reuse. For information about this award program, click here.

A Wider Circle: for the redistribution of furniture items that would otherwise go into the waste stream. $8,500.

Common Good City Farm: for preservation and fix-it workshops for D.C. residents. $10,000.

Community Forklift: for an outreach campaign focused on building material waste reduction. $10,000.

Frontline Gig, Inc: for an assessment estimating material reuse and estimating reuse diversion potential. $7,000.

ShopReuse LLC: for the reduction of construction materials in landfills and redistribution of supplies to BIPOC. $9,892.

The Fresh Food FactoryMarket: for the adoption of sustainability practices that will decrease the organization’s contributions to the waste stream. $10,000.

The Salvation Army National Capital Area Command: for increased capacity to store donated food. $2,500.

Three Part Harmony Farm: for the increased capacity of a Ward 5 off the grid farm. $6,371.

D.C. Urban Agriculture Small Award Program

The District of Columbia Urban Agriculture Small Grants Program is a partnership between the District of Columbia Department of Energy and Environment Office of Urban Agriculture and the Chesapeake Bay Trust. The goals of this program are to support increased operations of food production and distribution at urban farms and to advance strategies to support the success of agriculture businesses for socially disadvantaged farmers. For information about this grant program, click here.

Bridges Public Charter School: for a produce wash station, mobile mini-kitchen and greenhouse advancement for the Healthy Harvest Project at Bridges Public Charter School. $9,350.

Children of Mine: for increasing production and enhancing the efficiency of an existing eleven thousand square foot Urban Farm in the Anacostia neighborhood. $9,705.

City Blossoms: for construction of the Youth Garden at the Farm at Fort Stanton. $10,000.

Common Good City Farm: for creation of an equitable pricing point of sale system, to provide essential infrastructure to the pay-what-you-can Farm Stand. $8,804.

Housing Help Plus: for creating two biodynamic grape vineyard sites in Congress Heights and Fort Dupont Park neighborhoods that will be used as a teaching platform to exhibit organic and biodynamic farming practices to the entire community. $10,000.

My Seniors Keeper Foundation: for replicating two scalable vertical growing design and methodologies, and installation of a solar powered pavilion. $9,882.

Sovereign EarthWorks: for supporting operational costs at Sovereign EarthWorks. $10,000.

The Nicholson Project: for the renovation of farm workspace and expanding the distribution capacity to serve neighbors in Ward 7. $10,000.

Sponsorship Program

This program aims to support events that will increase awareness or knowledge on issues pertaining to restoration and protection of the Chesapeake Bay region natural resources and/or promote the Trust’s major sources of revenue. For information about this program click here.

Chesapeake Region Accessible Boating (CRAB): for the support of the 2022 CRAB Cup, an annual fundraiser to support accessible boating. $500.

November 2022

Awards will be posted here after the November board meeting.

February 2023

Awards will be posted here after the February board meeting.

May 2023

Awards will be posted here after the May board meeting.

Over $1 Million Announced to Support Green Infrastructure Projects to Improve Communities in MD, PA, VA, and WV

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Borough of Chambersburg, Pennsylvania – The Chesapeake Bay Trust, in partnership with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the West Virginia Department of Environmental Protection announce that $1,058,720 in funding has been awarded to 13 projects across Maryland, Pennsylvania, Virginia, and West Virginia as part of the Chesapeake Bay Green Streets, Green Jobs, Green Towns Grant Program. These awards help communities develop and implement plans that reduce stormwater runoff; increase the amount of green spaces in urban areas; improve the health of local rivers, streams, the Chesapeake Bay and the human populations within the communities; create “green jobs;” reduce energy use; and enhance livability in cities and communities.

“We congratulate all grantees for putting forth projects that will support clean water and strong neighborhoods,” said EPA Mid-Atlantic Regional Administrator Adam Ortiz. “This program helps communities reinvigorate gray and green infrastructure projects that reduce stormwater runoff and pollution to local waters and the Chesapeake Bay, while improving their economy, quality of life and community beautification.”

This green infrastructure program is designed to facilitate and encourage communities implementing traditional “gray” infrastructure projects, such as repaving roads or reconfiguring intersections, to add green elements at little additional cost. These green elements then offer cost-effective savings on stormwater treatment, flooding abatement, and other community benefits.

“The projects announced today show the value of adding green stormwater elements when other infrastructure improvements are planned,” said Alana Hartman, West Virginia Department of Environmental Protection’s Potomac Basin Coordinator. “These projects, led by communities and local organizations, will serve as a model for the entire region while helping to protect, preserve and enhance the quality of our water resources in the South Branch of the Potomac and the Chesapeake Bay Watershed.”

The Green Streets, Green Jobs, Green Towns Initiative was started in 2011, led by water experts at EPA and then expanded into the program it is today. To date, 245 projects have received funding and $14.4 million has been invested into greening communities.

Greening local communities has been shown to have multiple human benefits, from savings on energy costs that hit the wallet via provision of shade to reduction of illnesses to reduction in crime.  Studies show that time spent outdoors in green spaces leads to improved mental health, reduced absenteeism in employees, improved heart health, and more.

“Green infrastructure projects are one of those rare win-win-win scenarios:  They improve communities in various ways, they improve human health, and they also benefit our waterways,” said Dr. Jana Davis, president of the Chesapeake Bay Trust. “This program lets us take advantage of projects that communities want to do for themselves that just also happen to benefit the larger natural system way downstream.”

 

Green Streets, Green Jobs, Green Towns Grant Program Awardees

Borough of Chambersburg, Pennsylvania – $150,000
A project that will directly reduce stormwater runoff into the Conococheague Creek, reduce associated flooding in the immediate area, address bank stabilization, and implement green infrastructure components.  Major enhancements to the area include the reduction of Hood Street flooding; the installation of sub-surface infiltration beds to manage stormwater; the planting of pollinator gardens; and the removal of invasive species and planting native riparian buffers.

City Neighbors Foundation, Baltimore, Maryland – $148,883
A complete green renovation of the City Neighbors Charter parking lot, located in NE Baltimore City.  Installations include 1270 sq. ft. of micro-bioretention, 1679 sq. ft. of pervious paving, and a 105 sq. ft. rain garden, all of which will be open for exploration by students, their families, and the general public.

City of Romney, West Virginia – $118,555
A water filtration project to be located in Romney, West Virginia that will be funded through new program partner, West Virginia Department of Environmental Protection. The project will retrofit a large parking lot and adjoining streets with water filtering bioswales.  Runoff will be filtered from 3.3 acres of drainage area, 0.85 acres of which is impervious.  The filtration system will address the issue of unfiltered runoff into a nearby stream which flows less than one mile into the South Branch of the Potomac River.

Druid Heights Community Development Corporation, Baltimore, Maryland – $29,998
An engineering design to reduce the amount of stormwater runoff going into the Jones Falls watershed and the Chesapeake Bay. The design will create a community-envisioned greening plan that will incorporate trees, bioswales, and other stormwater management facilities. The design will be created with the residents as part of their overall vision for the West Baltimore neighborhood.

James River Association, Petersburg, Virginia – $118,146
The implementation of a critical component of green and gray infrastructure for the Lakemont community which will better manage stormwater and improve local water quality. The proposed Nash Street Grassy Swale project represents a continued commitment to implement infrastructure improvements for Lakemont which will enhance existing conditions, reduce the volume of stormwater runoff, and treat water quality.

Joe’s Movement Emporium/World Arts Focus, Mount Rainier, Maryland – $150,000
The implementation of stormwater management practices at Joe’s arts center, as part of “Story of Water and Art.” Stormwater management features – green roof, vertical rain gardens, and green roof demonstration unit – will resolve flooding issues around the urban property, and be integrated with native plants, educational signage, a mural, and outdoor program space.

ShoreRivers, Preston, Maryland – $24,122
A design of conservation improvements to the James T. Wright Memorial Park, adding bioswales to alleviate overly-saturated conditions, tree canopy to beautify and cool community gathering areas, and conservation meadows to enhance the beauty of the park and increase pollinator habitat.

The Community Ecology Institute, Columbia, Maryland – $108,650
The implementation of the engineered plans associated with Atholton high school, which will provide highly visible demonstrations of best management practices, achieve health benefits for the Middle Patuxent Watershed, address chronic neighborhood stormwater flooding, and provide an outdoor education space for the school community.

Town of Emmitsburg, Maryland – $121,400
The installation of a forebay and micropool with pilot channels and wetland area within the existing dry extended detention pond footprint to provide water quality controls for the 7.96-acres of impervious area while also providing water quantity controls for the 22.22-acre drainage area without increasing discharge flow rates.

Town of Galena, Maryland – $30,000
An engineered design plan that identifies potential solutions to address stormwater runoff that causes localized flooding in the area of Division Street and a parking area behind a local grocery store and delicatessen. Along with using green infrastructure practices such as bioretention, green infrastructure will be utilized to help improve the flow of traffic in and through the area as well to screen adjoining properties.

Town of Glen Echo, Maryland – $28,271
The design of two stormwater remediation projects, a rain garden at Town Hall and a swale in the right of way, that will address town flooding issues.

Town of Millington, Maryland – $9,995
A concept plan to treat stormwater runoff from impervious surfaces, environmental restoration, and pervious parking enhancements, while improving public access and opportunities via a kayak launch and shoreline improvements to the properties owned by the Town along the Chester River.

Watershed Alliance of York, York and Lancaster Counties, Pennsylvania – $20,700
A two-part workshop and repeatable workshop template that will focus on the responsibilities of Homeowner Associations (HOAs) in York and Lancaster counties for their stormwater management infrastructure. One important deliverable will be a template that groups such as watershed organizations can use to easily plan and conduct this workshop/charrette in counties throughout the Bay watershed.

Montgomery County’s First ‘Litter Trap’ Installed in Anacostia River Tributary

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The Anacostia Riverkeeper, the Montgomery County Department of the Environment, and the Chesapeake Bay Trust announced the installation of the County’s first “litter trap” that will catch trash flowing down a stream or river. The trap will float in the Lockridge Drive Tributary and capture litter. Using the stream current, it will guide debris into the trap and prevent it from flowing downstream to the Anacostia River and into the Chesapeake Bay.

“Plastic bottles make up 60 percent of all the trash that is found floating on the Anacostia River, and while the best way to reduce trash in our waterways is not to litter at all, this litter trap is another way to make sure that we are not leaving environmentally harmful trash behind,” said County Executive Marc Elrich. “I want to thank the Chesapeake Bay Trust and Anacostia Riverkeeper, our partners in finding innovative ways to clean up our streams and creeks. We are proud to support funding for projects such as the litter trap and to work with these local groups committed to cleaning their communities. These programs provide jobs, create awareness, and build community support for protecting our environment.”

Anacostia Riverkeeper is working with the Montgomery County Conservation Corps for maintenance, monitoring and data collection as the litter is collected and sorted.

“Anacostia Riverkeeper is thrilled to celebrate the installation of this first Bandalong Litter Trap in Montgomery County, making a total of eight in the watershed,” said Riverkeeper Trey Sherard of Anacostia Riverkeeper. “Trash, especially plastic, is such an enormous problem in the Anacostia and worldwide that we hope this is the first of many trash traps coming to the County as we continue to partner with the Department of Environmental Protection, Chesapeake Bay Trust, and Montgomery County Conservation Corps. What a wonderfully appropriate way to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the Clean Water Act.”

This trash trap project was funded via the Montgomery County Watershed Restoration and Outreach Grant Program. It is a partnership between the County and the Chesapeake Bay Trust that funds public outreach and stewardship projects, community-based restoration water quality implementation projects and litter-reduction projects throughout the County. The grants are funded entirely through the Montgomery County Water Quality Protection Charge and are administered by the Chesapeake Bay Trust, a regional grant-maker specializing in engaging nonprofit entities in restoration and outreach work.

“Our successful partnership with Montgomery County makes it possible to support diverse groups taking actions that both enrich their local communities and positively impact our natural resources,” said Jana Davis, president of the Chesapeake Bay Trust. “Innovative grantee projects, such as the litter trap, help improve healthy streams and rivers for all to enjoy.”

Since January, over $560,000 in grant funding was awarded to 15 projects throughout Montgomery County and since the program’s inception in 2014, over $3.4 million has been awarded through the grant program.

Projects have included public outreach; stewardship and community-based restoration efforts such as planting native plants and trees, promoting, and implementing green infrastructure practices, community training programs, and removing impervious surfaces; and trash reduction in the Anacostia River Watershed through litter trap maintenance and monitoring.

Chesapeake Bay Trust Blog & News

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Outdoor Learning Network Initiative Welcomes Two New Networks

 

The Chesapeake Bay Trust, in partnership with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), and the Chesapeake Bay Foundation, is pleased to welcome Baltimore City Public Schools and the Southeastern Virginia Environmental Education (SEVEE) Consortium to the Outdoor Learning Network Initiative (OLNI).

OLNI is a capacity building opportunity designed to advance environmental literacy goals by establishing local networks comprised of school districts and organizations who are committed to partnering and working collectively to embed environmental education into school system curriculum long-term.  The Initiative provides training, technical assistance, and ongoing support from the Chesapeake Bay Foundation and Local Concepts, as well as direct funding from the Chesapeake Bay Trust and NOAA over a two-year period.

“Meaningful environmental education lays the foundation for future restoration and protection of our local natural resources, said Dr. Jana Davis, president of the Chesapeake Bay Trust.  “This program creates long-lasting networks and partnerships for the school system to ensure that environmental literacy is not just a focus but becomes an integral part of the curriculum as a whole.”

OLNI offers the training and support to establish a local environmental literacy leadership team, develop an environmental literacy plan for the school district, establish new partnerships, provide teacher professional development training, and design and implement a systemic Meaningful Watershed Educational Experience program.  Baltimore City Public Schools will partner with Baltimore City Recreation & Parks and Living Classrooms Foundation to build their collaborative network.  The Center for Educational Partnerships at Old Dominion University will work with Hampton City Schools, Newport News Public Schools, Norfolk Public Schools, Portsmouth Public Schools, Suffolk Public Schools, Williamsburg City Public Schools, and to build the collaborative SEVEE network.

“The OLNI partnerships strive to ensure that every student in the district graduates with a comprehensive understanding of the environment, their community’s connections to it, and the responsibility we all share in protecting it,” said Tom Ackerman, Vice President for Education for the Chesapeake Bay Foundation.

It has been demonstrated in the Mid-Atlantic region that integrating environmental education programs into the curriculum has benefits for environmental literacy, academic achievement, and building an environmental stewardship ethic. Yet data of systemic environmental literacy programs in the region shows geographic gaps.  In 2015, the Chesapeake Bay Program working with the State Departments of Education developed an environmental literacy survey to assess school districts capacities and needs. The results of the survey showed the degree of support needed to advance the implementation of environmental education programming regionally.  As a result, OLNI was designed to address the identified gaps in high-need school districts on a regional scale.

“The education of all students should include a strong environmental component,” said Manager of Environmental Literacy and Partnerships for NOAA’s Chesapeake Bay Office, Shannon Sprague.  “By filling the gaps and creating lasting programs with meaningful environmental experiences for our students, we ensure the future advancement of research and restoration in the Chesapeake Bay region.”

Chesapeake Bay Trust Awards – Fiscal Year 2022

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The Chesapeake Bay Trust (Trust) has awarded over $130 million through more than 14,000 awards to ensure cleaner, greener, healthier Chesapeake, Coastal Bays, and Youghiogheny watersheds since 1985. The Trust has a rigorous grant review process: every proposal submitted over $5,000 is sent to members of a Technical Review Committee (TRC) and is reviewed and scored quantitatively by at least three external individuals who are experts in their fields. The Board of Trustees meets 4 times per year to review and approve all TRC recommended proposals. Proposals for $5,000 or less are reviewed by two or more technical experts on the Chesapeake Bay Trust program team. The award list will be updated after each board meeting. Reach out to the designated program officer for more details.

September 2021

Community Engagement and Restoration Mini Grants

This program is designed to engage Maryland residents in activities that enhance communities, engage residents, and improve natural resources by funding small-scale activities such as tree plantings, rain gardens, and community cleanups, among others. For information about this grant program click here.

Allegany County Commissioners: for support of the Too Toxic to Trash household hazardous waste collection event. $2,500.

Empowering Believers Church: for additional native plants on 3,154 square feet of existing rain gardens located on historic African American congregation property. $5,000.

Friends School of Harford: for the installation of 5 rain cisterns and development of an inter-generational educational program. $5,000.

GeN’xt Ministries Inc: for a series of monthly community cleanups and the creation of media to support community education. $3,655.

Ignite Development Network: for a summer STEAM program for underrepresented middle schoolers and local communities, culminating in a a pollinator garden installation and community cleanup. $4,460.

Plastic Free QAC, Inc.: for a bioswale garden bordering the Harris Crab House and the Kent Narrows, to slow and treat stormwater runoff. $3,346.

Pride of Baltimore, Inc.: to bring four free sails to underserved port communities in Baltimore and Georgetown, Maryland. $4,800.

St. Mark Church Fallston: for the conversion of turf grass to a meadow of native plant species. $5,000.

St. Marks Catholic Church: for the promotion of environmental stewardship through the lens of creation care, with a focus on native plants, to a majority Latino congregation. $4,929.

St. Ursula Roman Catholic Congregation: for the revitalization of the Northeast Interfaith Prayer Garden, which serves the community of St. Anthony, including an onsite women’s asylee group. $3,278.

Upton Planning Committee: for the transformation of a vacant lot into a community green space on Getting Street. $5,000.

District of Columbia Community Stormwater Solutions

The Community Stormwater Solutions Grant Program is a partnership between the Chesapeake Bay Trust and the District of Columbia Department of Energy and Environment. This program provides funding for innovative, community-oriented and –inspired projects, aimed at improving water quality in the District of Columbia, reducing litter, and raising awareness about what we can do to restore our rivers, streams, and parks. For information about this grant program click here.

After-School All-Stars: for engagement of students, parents, and the broader community in scientific inquiry of local green spaces. $30,000.

Casey Trees: for a series of community activities focused on maintaining existing trees and enhancing other green infrastructure practices. $24,339.

Constituent Services Worldwide Public Benefit Corporation: for the implementation of the Green Infrastructure Apprenticeship Program. $30,000.

Designgreen LLC: for the implementation of a design and community action plan to capture stormwater runoff. $30,000.

Designgreen LLC: for the engagement of Latino landscape companies in the implementation of a green roof maintenance training program. $30,000.

Flywheel Development LLC: for the creation of consensus-based and professionally made design drawings to capture stormwater runoff. $23,881.

Friends of Kenilworth Aquatic Gardens: for a series of activities in nature to promote restoration of the watershed and personal health. $18,000.

Living Classrooms Foundation of the National Capital Region: for immersive, out-of-school time programming with underserved youth groups. $29,997.

National Wildlife Federation: for educational and restoration activities on congregation grounds and congregation members’ homes. $35,000.

Near Southeast Community Partners: for participation of Latino residents in workforce training on stormwater solutions and career pathways. $30,000.

The Green Scheme: for the training of community leaders as water ambassadors and for family-oriented watershed activities. $29,122.

Washington Area Bicyclist Association: for bicycle explorer camps to provide youth and families with opportunities to learn about local waterways. $22,000.

District of Columbia Urban Agriculture Small Grant Program

The District of Columbia Urban Agriculture Small Grants Program is a partnership between the District of Columbia Department of Energy and Environment Office of Urban Agriculture and the Chesapeake Bay Trust. The goals of this program are to support increased operations of food production and distribution at urban farms and to advance strategies to support the success of agriculture businesses for socially disadvantaged farmers. For information about this grant program, click here.

Friendship Public Charter School: for the installation of agricultural tables at the Friendship Collegiate Academy Early College Campus and for the expansion of raised beds at the Technology Preparatory Academy. $10,000.

Garfield Terrace Senior Citizens: for the implementation of a sustainable food system in communities of color and for educational programs for youth at farm sites. $9,574.

Hope Pilgrim LLC: for the development of video tutorials on sustainable agriculture practices to be designed with and created for black farmers. $3,902.

LeDroit Park Community Garden: for re-installation of ten raised beds in the LeDroit Park Community Garden. $4,580.

Sovereign EarthWorks: for workshops regarding nutrition, food sovereignty, and ancestral heirloom plant varieties and for an increase of food production for Queer and Trans Black, Indigenous, People of Color (BIPOC) communities. $10,000.

Environmental Education Mini Grants

This program is designed to increase student awareness and involvement in the restoration and protection of our region’s natural resources by increasing access to programs that provide Meaningful Watershed Educational Experiences (MWEEs). For information about this grant program click here.

Anacostia Watershed Society: for 400 2nd and 4th grade students to participate in the Saving Our Native Grasslands program. $5,000.

Bethesda Green: for 12 students in 11th and 12th grades to participate in a MWEE program. $4,952.

Booker T. Washington Middle School: for 150 seventh graders to study wetlands and submerged aquatic vegetation. $4,750.

Broadway High School: for 15 students in 11th and 12th grades to assess the health of the Shenandoah River. $320.

Catonsville Middle School: for 269 6th grade students to participate in a meaningful watershed education experience (MWEE) focused on ecosystem education. $5,000.

Charlotte County School Board: for 150 ninth through twelfth grade students to investigate the health of their local waterways. $5,000.

Clergy United for the Transformation of Sandtown: for youth from diverse backgrounds to create media focused on environmental justice in their communities. $5,000.

Elizabeth River Project, The: for 3,000 students and 200 teachers from 3rd, 9th, and 11th grades from Norfolk Public Schools to participate in the Barge on Wheels program. $5,000.

Friends of the Rappahannock: for 200 4th, 6th, and 9th grade students from Rappahannock County to participate in a MWEE program. $5,000.

Immaculate Conception School: for 148 4th and 5th grade students to participate in a meaningful watershed educational experience (MWEE). $4,905.

James River Association: for 160 8th grade students to investigate the importance of water at North Bay. $5,000.

James River Association: for 65 5th grade students from Lakemont Elementary School to participate in the Paint out Pollution program. $5,000.

J.C. Parks Elementary School: for the installation of a pollinator garden. $4,995.

Live It Learn It: for eight fifth grade classrooms to investigate plastic pollution. $5,000.

Maree G. Farring Elementary/Middle School: for 70 6th grade students to investigate the importance of water at North Bay. $4,950.

One Montgomery Green: for 40 8th – 12th grade students to investigate the plastic waste in local stream and develop solutions to the issues identified. $5,000.

Payne Elementary School PTSA: for 360 prek-3 through fifth grade students to participate in investigations of the local waterways and install a ‘bayscape’ on school grounds. $4,970.

Poolesville High School: for 90 9th grade students to participate in a field trip and learn about sustainable development. $3,724.

Rivanna Conservation Alliance: for 200 6th grade students from Burley Middle School to investigate the health of the Rivanna and James Rivers. $4,903.

Skyline High School: for 150 ninth through twelfth grade students to investigate their local waterways. $4,875.

So What Else, inc: for the installation of a community garden and engagement of middle school students in Washington, D.C. $5,000.

Sparrows Point North Point Historical Society Inc.: for an outdoor classroom and native plant garden at Sparrows Point High School. $5,000.

Spring Grove Area Senior High School: for installation of accessible pathways to campus wetlands for student investigations. $5,000.

Summit School, Anne Arundel County: for renovating the outdoor learning space and creation of native plant gardens. $5,000.

The Springwell School, Inc.: for 25 K-5 students to investigate the connection of humans to the environment. $5,000.

Takoma Park Cooperative Nursery School: for outdoor classroom creation to conduct Meaningful Watershed Education Experience (MWEE) investigations for Pre-K to 5 students. $5,000.

The Belair-Edison School Brendan Avenue (Afya Baltimore): for construction of a pollinator garden. $3,000.

The Tome School: for 72 ninth through twelfth grade students to investigate antibiotic resistant microbes in local waterways. $5,000.

Wind Dance Farm & Earth Education Center: for 80 third through twelfth graders from Morgan County, West Virginia to investigate wildlife habitat and stormwater runoff. $5,000.

Sponsorship

This program aims to support events that will increase awareness or knowledge on issues pertaining to restoration and protection of the Chesapeake Bay region natural resources and/or promote the Trust’s major sources of revenue. For information about this program click here.

Chesapeake Region Accessible Boating (CRAB): for support of the annual fundraiser, CRAB Cup 2021. $500.

Maryland Association of Floodplain and Stormwater Managers: for support of the 17th Maryland Association of Floodplain and Stormwater Managers Annual Conference. $750.

Maryland Natural History Society: for support of SharkFest, an annual event that celebrates Sharks and engages visitors in hands-on learning. $500.

Sultana Education Foundation: for support of the 2021 Annual Gala and Down rigging Festival. $1,000.

University of Maryland College Park: for support of the 2021 Environmental Justice and Health Disparities Symposium. $2,000.

November 2021

Chesapeake Oyster Innovation Award Program

The Chesapeake Oyster Innovation Award Program is a partnership between the Chesapeake Oyster Alliance and the Chesapeake Bay Trust that funds projects that meet any of the following three goals: increase knowledge about oyster fisheries or oyster aquaculture, advance in small-scale technologies for either increasing oyster population or oyster aquaculture, and increase in oyster fishery or aquaculture measurement/monitoring techniques or activities. For information about this grant program click here.

Annapolis Aquaculture: for the creation of equipment to assist oyster aquaculture farmers. $7,865.

Black Girls Dive Foundation, Inc.: for the development of a monitoring and educational program for underrepresented girls from Baltimore City high schools. $10,000.

Lynnhaven River NOW: for support of a community science program to increase efforts to improve oyster restoration. $9,600.

Oyster Seed Holdings: for the development of educational programming about an oyster hatchery thorough videos and tours. $10,000.

Portsmouth Public Schools: for the development of a meaningful watershed education experience program focused on oysters. $9,995.

Rogue Oysters LLC: for the development of a new type of bottom cage to increase oyster farming efficiency. $10,000.

Severn River Association, Inc.: for a survey of historic reef locations on the Severn river. $10,000.

Shored Up LLC: for a series of educational activities about the history of oysters and efforts to restore the oyster population. $9,925.

Smithsonian Institution: for the creation of digital resources for educators and students about cutting edge oyster research. $9,900.

St. Mary’s River Watershed Association: for the development of educational programming on oysters and sustainable practices for boaters and homeowners. $10,000.

University of Maryland Baltimore County: for the development of a land based system to reduce oyster mortality over the winter at Chesapeake Bay oyster farms. $10,000.

University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science: for the development of a model to predict important indicators of oyster aquaculture yield. $9,900.

Virginia Institute of Marine Science: for the development of an oyster inventory management protocol using Radio Frequency Identification technology. $10,000.

Community Engagement and Restoration Mini Grants

This program is designed to engage Maryland residents in activities that enhance communities, engage residents, and improve natural resources by funding small-scale activities such as tree plantings, rain gardens, and community cleanups, among others. For information about this grant program click here.

Audubon Naturalist Society of the Central Atlantic States, Inc.: for the development of docent-led tours and creation of a Field Guide to Woodend Sanctuary. $4,997.

Friends of St Clements Bay, Inc: for 31 trees to be installed on community property shared by the Leonardtown Library and Garvey Senior Activity Center. $4,050.

Marine Science Foundation, Inc: for two dive operations to conduct “ghost gear” cleanups and events to increase awareness on the impacts of fishing gear litter. $3,000.

NeighborSpace of Baltimore County, Inc.: to install native plants and engage the Dunmore Community in the enhancement of forest understory. $3,780.

Our Lady Help of Christians: for a series of workshops and clean-ups to support the implementation of a congregation-wide recycling program. $3,440.

The 6th Branch: for a forum to convene diverse community stakeholders to generate solution-oriented actions to address climate change. $1,930.

Town of Boonsboro: for the engagement of residents in planting 500 native trees on public and private land. $4,960.

Waverly Improvement Association: for the installation of a rainwater catchment system and a community workshop on rainwater harvesting. $1,000.

Outdoor Learning Network Initiative

The Outdoor Learning Network Initiative is a partnership between the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and the Chesapeake Bay Trust working closely with the Chesapeake Bay Program Education Workgroup. The goal of this initiative is to advance environmental literacy at the district level by establishing local networks comprised of school districts and organizations who are committed to partnering and working collectively to embed environmental education into the school system long-term.

Cacapon Institute: for building a network in West Virginia that would address barriers and provide support to advancing systemic environmental literacy at the local level. $30,000.

Conservation Foundation of Lancaster County: for building a network in Lancaster, Pennsylvania that would address barriers and provide support to advancing systemic environmental literacy at the local level. $29,320.

Outreach and Restoration

This program encourages outreach and community engagement activities that increase stewardship ethic of natural resources and on-the-ground restoration activities that demonstrate restoration techniques and engage Maryland citizens in the restoration and protection of the Chesapeake Bay and its rivers. For information about this grant program click here.

Accokeek Foundation: for engagement of Black, Indigenous, and People of Color (BIPOC) youth voices in educational programming. $19,933.

Anne Arundel Watershed Stewards Academy: to develop a behavior change toolkit. $44,560.

Audubon Naturalist Society of the Central Atlantic States, Inc.: to educate 70 latinx families about the health of their streams.. $21,195.

Blue Water Baltimore: for support of the Bugs and Blitzes program $30,000.

Canton Canopy: to plant 120 urban trees. $31,400.

Central Baltimore Partnership: for wetland installation and education at the Union Collective $73,984.

Churchville Presbyterian Congregation: for the installation of practices to reduce stormwater runoff. $72,986.

Civic Works, Inc.: for support of the Landscape Pre-Apprenticeship Pilot Program. $25,000.

Friends of the Patapsco Valley Heritage Greenway, Inc.: for stream cleanups, invasive plant removals, native plantings, and storm drain labeling. $26,000.

Friends of the Patapsco Valley State Park: for the support of various “Ranger” programs. $20,698.

Friends of the Patapsco Valley State Park: for an adaptive cycling program for veterans. $24,000.

Greater Grace World Outreach, Inc.: for the installation of three stormwater management practices and educational workshops. $57,012.

Gunpowder Valley Conservancy: for a suite of stormwater management practices and workshops. $40,000.

Howard County Chinese School: for the creation of a sustainable gardening program. $9,750.

Inner Arbor Trust, Inc.: for native plants, tree plantings, and workshops. $44,000.

Interfaith Partners for the Chesapeake (IPC): for continued green team development and training at faith-based organizations tailored for the City of Gaithersburg. $7,737.

Interfaith Partners for the Chesapeake (IPC): for continued green team development and training at faith-based organizations tailored for the City of Salisbury. $14,445.

Interfaith Partners for the Chesapeake (IPC): for continued green team development and training at faith-based organizations tailored for Howard County. $14,000.

Interfaith Partners for the Chesapeake (IPC): for continued green team development and training at faith-based organizations tailored for Harford County participants. $16,026.

Interfaith Partners for the Chesapeake (IPC): for green team development and training at faith-based organizations tailored for Charles County. $7,605.

Interfaith Partners for the Chesapeake (IPC): for continued green team development and training at faith-based organizations tailored for Baltimore City participants $15,160.

Izaak Walton League of America (The): for support of the Winter Salt Watch program to educate and train business owners and others on road salt application and best practices in the City of Gaithersburg. $29,998.

Joe’s Movement Emporium/World Arts Focus: for the installation of stormwater best management practices and associated outreach efforts. $64,368.

Lower Shore Land Trust: for invasive species removal and management trainings and native plantings. $39,557.

National Aquarium: to co-create environmental-focused learning opportunities with Latinx community members. $30,000.

NeighborSpace of Baltimore County, Inc.: for restoration of a vacant parcel of land into a community park. $34,070.

Oyster Recovery Partnership, Inc.: for the Marylanders Grow Oysters program to recruit waterfront communities and homeowners to care for cages of juvenile oysters until they mature. $30,000.

Patterson Park Audubon Center: for support of the Bird Ambassador Program. $25,000.

Rotary Club of Columbia-Patuxent Charitable Trust: for engaging community members in stream health education and data collection. $22,000.

ShoreRivers: to increase the tree canopy cover in historically underserved communities. $20,000.

ShoreRivers: to support the Pets, Vets, and Harmful Algal Blooms program. $16,117.

SilvoCulture, Inc.: for the installation of a food forest and educational workshops, tours, and hands-on activities. $32,454.

The Community Ecology Institute: for transforming lawns into native plant and food gardens and associated outreach and engagement efforts. $26,000.

University of Maryland College Park: for continued support of the Sustainable Maryland program. $30,000.

University of Maryland College Park: for stakeholder and community meetings to identify environmental resources, capacity, and needs in Charles County to develop a database and map of key stakeholder information. $26,842.

Urban Ecosystem Restorations, Inc.: for native plantings and a Nature PlaySpace at the Lakelands community in the City of Gaithersburg. $74,765.

Wicomico Environmental Trust (WET): for tree plantings at Waterside Park and educational events. $58,774.

Prince George's County Rain Check Rebate

The Prince George’s County Rain Check Rebate Program offers rebate incentives to homeowners, businesses, and others to install practices that will improve stormwater runoff quality, reduce pollution, and improve local stream and river health. Seven types of stormwater practices are eligible for rebates: rain barrels, cisterns, rain gardens, urban tree canopy, pavement removal, permeable pavement, and green roofs. For information about this grant program click here.

Neighborhood Design Center: to install one (240 sq. ft.) rain garden at a residential property in District Heights, Maryland. $2,400.

February 2022

Anne Arundel Community Tree Planting Mini Grant

This program provides small community-based grants to help communities and organizations increase the number trees and tree canopy in neighborhoods, parks, and communities. For information about this grant program, click here.

Wild Rose Shores Community Association: for tree planting and a pollinator garden on a community lot that has high demonstration and educational value for the residents. This award is supported at $5,000 with $2,500 from this program and $2,500 from the Trust’s Community Engagement and Restoration Mini Grant Program. $5,000.

Capacity Building Initiative

The Capacity Building Initiative (CBI) is a joint initiative of the Chesapeake Bay Trust and Chesapeake Bay Funders Network. The Capacity Building Grant Program is designed to increase the effectiveness of organizations that work at the nexus of natural resource and community health issues, within the Chesapeake Bay, Coastal Bays, and Youghiogheny River watersheds by addressing organizational capacity needs. For information about this grant program, click here.

Alliance for the Chesapeake Bay: for communications capacity building and  story-telling of black, indigenous, and people of color communities. $26,158.

Audubon Naturalist Society of the Central Atlantic States, Inc.: for the development of five-year strategic plan that incorporates inclusion, diversity, equity, and accessibility. $25,000.

Chesapeake Conservation Landscaping Council: for a fundraising consultant to expand and diversify organizational fundraising capacity. $24,664.

Chesapeake Legal Alliance: for a strategic fundraising plan and board member training on fundraising and donor development. $30,000.

EcoLatinos, Inc.: for management training and the development of a communications plan. $30,000.

George Washington Carver Agricultural Research Center, Inc: for a series of facilitated planning and visioning sessions for the Agriculture and Food Security Working Group at the Carver Center. $21,688.

National Wildlife Federation: for the development of a civic engagement tool-kit and trainings. $30,000.

National Wildlife Federation: for the Young Professionals of Color Mentorship program. $30,000.

Rock Creek Conservancy: for the expansion of the Stormwater Partners Network to better reflect the demographics of the region. $29,700.

Virginia Conservation Network: for the creation of a 5 year strategic business plan. $30,000.

Community Engagement and Restoration Mini Grants

This program is designed to engage Maryland residents in activities that enhance communities, engage residents, and improve natural resources by funding small-scale activities such as tree plantings, rain gardens, and community cleanups, among others. For information about this grant program click here.

Back River Restoration Committee (BRRC): to build awareness on low impact stormwater management and install five rain gardens on residential properties. $5,000.

Baltimore City Department of Public Works: for pop-up events and workshops to support small-scale stormwater management practices and greening efforts in underserved communities. $5,000.

Harford County Climate Action: for a campaign centered around five native butterfly and moth species and their host plant species and to promote environmentally friendly landscaping practices. $5,000.

Maryland Forests Association, Inc.: for an agroforestry planting and interpretive trail in the existing forest at Mt. Pleasant Acres Farm that is part of the Harriet Tubman Underground Railroad. $4,502.

Patuxent Palisades Civic Association: for a pollinator garden to increase awareness on the importance of native pollinator plants. $2,000.

Prince George’s Audubon Society: for a pollinator garden to engage the students and families of Joe’s Movement Emporium, an arts hub providing cultural and economic opportunity. $5,000.

Stillmeadow Community Fellowship: for an urban garden to commemorate lives lost to violent crime and to serve as a community healing space. $2,300.

Town of Hillsboro: to restore a one-acre meadow with native plants at a site adjacent to the Town Hall and park. $3,023.

Town of North Beach: for a workshop and demonstration rain garden at Wetlands Overlook Park. $3,132.

Environmental Education

The Environmental Education Grant Program funds initiatives and programs that advance environmental literacy and result in students gaining the knowledge, skills, and appreciation for nature to take responsible actions to protect and restore their local environment. For information about this grant program, click here.

Annapolis Maritime Museum & Park: for a year-round mentoring program for disadvantaged youth that promotes environmental and financial literacy, self-esteem, academic and life skills, leadership, and civic responsibility. $39,873.

Carroll County Public Schools: for a Meaningful Watershed Educational Experience (MWEE) embedded in Carroll County Public Schools ninth and tenth grade Chemistry 1 course centered around air quality that focuses on integrating climate change, equity, environmental justice and student voice. $80,000.

Chesapeake Audubon Society/Pickering Creek Audubon Center: for a Meaningful Watershed Educational Experience (MWEE) embedded in Caroline County Public Schools ninth and tenth grade Environmental Earth Science and American Government courses and centered around taking action to ensure the health of ecosystems across the Chesapeake Bay watershed. $90,770.

Maryland Association for Environmental and Outdoor Education (MAEOE): for a professional learning community of faculty focused on increasing environmental literacy knowledge and pedagogy, comfort and confidence teaching outdoors, and capacity to model best environmental education practices in preservice teacher programs across Maryland. $39,531.

ShoreRivers: for a Meaningful Watershed Educational Experience (MWEE) embedded in Queen Anne’s County Public Schools second grade curriculum and focused on the importance of pollinators. $39,826.

Green Streets, Green Jobs, Green Towns

This program is designed to help communities develop and implement plans that reduce stormwater runoff, increase the number and amount of green spaces in urban areas, improve the health of local streams and the Chesapeake Bay, and enhance quality of life and community livability. For information about this grant program, click here.

City of Annapolis: for green infrastructure design and implementation in Annapolis, Maryland. $65,000.

Montgomery County Watershed Restoration & Outreach

This program funds public outreach and stewardship projects, community-based restoration water quality implementation projects, and litter reduction projects in the Anacostia River Watershed through trash trap maintenance and monitoring. For information about this grant program, click here.

Anacostia Riverkeeper: for a green infrastructure project design. $30,000.

Anacostia Riverkeeper: for a volunteer water quality monitoring project in the Middle Anacostia watershed. $29,300.

Audubon Naturalist Society of the Central Atlantic States, Inc.: for a litter reduction campaign targeting youth. $42,165.

Audubon Naturalist Society of the Central Atlantic States, Inc.: for a green infrastructure practice and bilingual educational video. $74,074.

Bethesda Green: for a stormwater site analysis and project design. $30,000.

Catholic University of America: for a litter concentration waste map of the Anacostia Watershed. $50,000.

Chinese American Parent Association of Montgomery County: for a watershed outreach and awareness program. $24,990.

EcoLatinos, Inc.: for a green infrastructure maintenance outreach and engagement project. $29,983.

Forest Knolls Pool: for a stormwater site analysis and green infrastructure design project. $30,000.

Friends of Cabin John Creek: for a public outreach and stewardship project in the Cabin John Creek Watershed. $53,523.

Interfaith Partners for the Chesapeake (IPC): for a virtual watershed restoration training program. $9,761.

Izaak Walton League of America (The): for a road salt outreach and awareness campaign. $29,972.

National Wildlife Federation: for a native plant outreach project for the faith-based community. $50,000.

Potomac Riverkeeper Network: for a watershed outreach and education project. $30,000.

Vietnamese American Services: for a watershed outreach & awareness project targeting the Vietnamese community in Silver Spring, Maryland. $49,984.

Prince George's County Stormwater Stewardship

This program funds on-the-ground restoration activities that improve neighborhoods, improve water quality, and engage Prince George’s County residents in the restoration and protection of the local rivers and streams of Prince George’s County. For information about this grant program, click here.

Anacostia Watershed Society: for the Mussel Power education program to engage teachers and students in raising native freshwater mussels and their importance to water quality. $22,653.

Central Kenilworth Avenue Revitalization Community Development Corporation, Inc.: for tree plantings on private residential property and workshops to educate residents about the benefits of trees. $99,990.

City of Mount Rainier: for the installation of 13 rain gardens on Arundel Road between 25th and 30th streets and 29th and 30th streets. $150,520.

Defensores de la Cuenca: for education on the connection of environmental health and human health through fishing events, workshops, and trainings. $29,964.

Defensores de la Cuenca: for the 7th Annual Festival del Rio to engage the Spanish-speaking community in watershed protection topics and activities in Prince George’s County. $25,575.

Global Health and Education Projects, Inc.: for tree plantings on private residential property and educating residents on the benefits of trees. $58,000.

National Wildlife Federation: for workshops on rain gardens, native plants, and the Prince George’s County Rain Check Rebate Program at Oseh Shalom synagogue, African-American St. Marks United Methodist Church, and the Islamic Community Center of Laurel. $30,000.

Town of Colmar Manor: for engineered designs for permeable pavement at the intersection of Newark Road and 43rd Street. $36,318.

Town of Edmonston: for the installation of seven rain gardens on Hamilton Street. $131,785.

University Christian Church: for the installation of one rain garden, four bioswales, and tree plantings. $50,800.

University of Maryland College Park: for Phase 2 of the Sustainable Maryland Residential Action Framework to engage Homeowner Associations and their residents in watershed protection activities in Prince George’s County. $29,975.

Washington Area Bicyclist Association: for ecologically themed bike rides along the Anacostia Tributary Trail system. $9,420.

Sponsorship

This program aims to support events that will increase awareness or knowledge on issues pertaining to restoration and protection of the Chesapeake Bay region natural resources and/or promote the Trust’s major sources of revenue. For information about this program click here.

Anne Arundel Watershed Stewards Academy: for the 11th annual Watershed Stewards Academy conference, an event that brings together community members and environmental professionals to share environmental stewardship best practices. $500.

Forever Maryland Foundation: for a series of webinars centered on land preservation, tree and species biodiversity, and funding opportunities for land preservation and restoration. $500.

ShoreRivers: to support an action-oriented youth environmental summit for middle and high schoolers. $500.

Veteran's Engagement Mini Grant Program

The Veteran’s Engagement Mini Grant Program is designed to support veteran’s groups and organizations engaging veteran’s groups as they provide healing and therapeutic services, outdoor recreation, community engagement, and green jobs training. For information about this program, click here.

Preservation Trust of Wicomico, Inc: for the clearing of a nature trail to commemorate Buffalo Soldier history. $5,000.

Watershed Assistance Grant Program

This program supports watershed restoration project design assistance, watershed planning, and programmatic development associated with protection and restoration programs and projects that lead to improved water quality in the Maryland region. For information about this grant program click here.

Arundel Rivers Federation: for design of a living shoreline project at Long Point peninsula of South River Farms Park in Edgewater. $36,183.

Arundel Rivers Federation: for development of a watershed action plan for the Lerch and Tenthouse Creek subwatersheds and Galesville community. $48,518.

Blue Water Baltimore: for design of stormwater management practices at Miracle City Church. $85,000.

Cecil Soil Conservation District: for design of the Howard Property ecological restoration project. $131,125.

Chesapeake Village Condominium Association, Inc.: for design of stormwater management practices. $64,600.

Fairwinds of Annapolis Condominium Council of Unit Owners: for design of bioretention facilities. $27,500.

Greater Baybrook Alliance: for design of stormwater management projects at Duane Avenue Park. $72,184.

GreenTrust Alliance Inc.: for design of a living shoreline in Gray’s Inn Creek at Herringtown Cape (Phase 1C). $50,749.

Harford Soil Conservation District: for design of the unnamed tributary to Little Gunpowder stream restoration project. $99,320.

Islamic Society of Baltimore: for design of stormwater management practices, including bioswales. $63,600.

Neeld Estates Citizens Association (NECA): for design of a living shoreline project. $34,731.

NeighborSpace of Baltimore County, Inc.: for design of stormwater management practices in the Village of 12 Trees. $74,195.

Prince George’s County, Maryland: for development of a sediment and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) reduction plan and concept plans for top priority projects for Lower Beaverdam Creek. $50,000.

Sherwood Episcopal Church: for design of a regenerative stormwater conveyance system. $60,139.

ShoreRivers: for design of a stream and wetland restoration project in the Middle Chester at the Morgan Creek/Quinn Farm. $90,000.

ShoreRivers: for design of a stream and wetland restoration project at Davis Farm on Langston Creek. $59,330.

ShoreRivers: for design of a wetland restoration project at Jones Dairy Farm. $99,074.

ShoreRivers: for development of an Eastern Shore stream restoration prioritization plan. $72,801.

The Evangelical Lutheran Church of the Prince of Peace: for design of stormwater management practices including one micro-bioretention, two bioswales, and two rain gardens. $36,969.

May 2022

Anne Arundel Community Tree Planting Mini Grant

This program provides small community-based grants to help communities and organizations increase the number trees and tree canopy in neighborhoods, parks, and communities. For information about this grant program, click here.

Hermitage Community Association to plant 54 native, water-absorbing trees to reduce stormwater runoff and beautify the Hermitage community entryway. Funding was increased to support the protection of newly planted trees from wildlife and signage at the project site. $2,500

Anne Arundel County Watershed Restoration

This program funds projects to reduce pollutants through the implementation of watershed restoration practices. Projects must accomplish on-the-ground restoration that treats rainwater runoff from impervious surfaces or demonstrates the accomplishment of another metric that will help the County and City meet local water quality and runoff reduction improvement goals. For information about this grant program, click here.

Arundel Rivers Federation for the design and permitting of a wet pond retrofit and step pool conveyance system project at the Harness Creek Overlook community to improve water quality and reduce erosion of an unnamed tributary to Harness Creek. $77,237.

Arundel Rivers Federation for the restoration of approximately 600 feet of rapidly eroding shoreline in Mayo, Maryland through a living shoreline and a dune/headland restoration approach to enhance the resiliency of this site against climate change. $177,427.

Arundel Rivers Federation for the implementation of a bioswale to treat rainwater and slow down erosive flows from impervious surfaces along Paca Drive on Turkey Point Island. $31,514.

Chesapeake Rivers Association for the restoration of 1,397 linear feet of a stream channel in the Shipley’s Retreat neighborhood at the headwaters of the Severn River to address current erosion and to provide safe access for the neighborhood to enjoy community greenspace. $300,151.

Chesapeake Rivers Association for the implementation the Chestnut Hill Cove Phase III project, which includes the restoration of 1,200 linear feet of stream and shoreline through a nature-based regenerative stormwater conveyance method for stream restoration. $299,890.

Pines Community Improvement Association for the implementation of a micro-bioretention best management practice on Pines Community Improvement Association property at the Pines Park/Playground to slow down, filter, and treat stormwater from impervious surfaces and ultimately reduce runoff enter. $24,479.

Severn River Association, Inc. for the design and implementation of best management practices at the Nautilus Point community to treat stormwater runoff that flows from impervious surfaces on the property into Back Creek, a tributary of the Severn River.  $131,970.

Severn River Association, Inc. for the design and permitting of best management practices in the Wardour community, including a living shoreline on community property to improve water quality in the Severn River and improve community resilience to climate change. $77,630.

Chesapeake Conservation Corps Projects

These grants support Chesapeake Conservation Corps Members and can be used to fund a wide range of activities, and are meant to: support the Capstone Project or other project in the work plan that is managed by the Corps Member, and provide the Corps Member with grant-writing experience. For information about this grant program, click here.

American Chestnut Land Trust for a monitoring study that will establish a baseline of ecological health in the Horse Swamp Tributary. $1,244

American Chestnut Land Trust for land stewardship through hands-on work experiences at ACLT in Calvert County, Maryland All Hands on Deck Event with the Chesapeake Conservation Corps 2022 cohort. $1,500

American Chestnut Land Trust for installing a new fence at ACLT’s one-acre regenerative farm. $1,019

Anne Arundel County Department of Recreation and Parks Jug Bay Wetlands Sanctuary for Nature Discovery Place maintenance and improvements at the Nature Preserve at Wayson’s Corner All Hands on Deck Event with the Chesapeake Conservation Corps 2022 cohort. $1,500

C.A. Lester and Associates for Corps DEIJ Training. $4,800

Chesapeake Conservancy for signs on Susquehanna University’s campus to highlight the importance of conservation and restoration to the Susquehanna community. $1,200

Chesapeake Conservancy for planning and implementing the first in person National Junior Ranger Day celebration in the Chesapeake Bay Watershed. $1,250

ECO City Farms for an after school education program for fourth to sixth graders at the Edmonston farm and a video showcasing the success. $1,250

Friends of Jug Bay Wetlands Sanctuary for engaging the community in a BioBlitz of Emory Waters Nature Preserve. $1,250

Howard County Conservancy, Inc. for habitat restoration to promote biodiversity in the forest ecosystems of the Howard County Conservancy. $1,248

Howard County Office of Community Sustainability for the Howard County Brews and Bulbs; a lightbulb exchange program. $1,035

Interfaith Partners for the Chesapeake (IPC) for implementation of a community science program. $1,250

Interfaith Partners for the Chesapeake (IPC) for expanding the existing historical interpretations surrounding Pemberton Park, a Lower Shore preserved wilderness site, to display the full breadth of history involving environmental justice. $555

Maryland Coastal Bays Program for a 3-day environmental retreat for 15 Worcester County Public School ninth and tenth grade students. $1,250

Maryland Department of Natural Resources (DNR) for a species distribution model to identify suitable habitat and prioritize restoration sites across Maryland for the rare freshwater Creeper mussel. $986

National Aquarium for on-the-ground stewardship of the Fort McHenry Wetland; an All Hands on Deck Event with the Chesapeake Conservation Corps 2022 cohort. $1,125

National Aquarium for the Community Science and Stewardship field day events at Fort McHenry. $1,250

National Marine Educators Association for completing a lesson plan and presentation on the statistical program “R” at the National Marine Educators Association’s upcoming conference. $1,250

National Park Service Chesapeake Bay for creating a zine or small booklet which includes artists in and around the Chesapeake Bay Watershed. $418

Severn River Association, Inc. for assessing the presence and health of oyster restoration reefs in the Severn River. $1,210

The Community Ecology Institute for removing invasive plants and planting native species with ecological value at Freetown Farm. $1,220

The James and Anne Robinson Foundation, Inc for improvement of an outdoor learning space at Robinson Nature Center. $1,250

The Nature Conservancy for evaluating the effects of prescribed burning at the Robinson Neck Preserve in Dorchester County, Maryland. $1,250

Town of Edmonston for a community Zen Garden and conducting maintenance at ECO City; Farm All Hands on Deck Event with the Chesapeake Conservation Corps 2022 cohort. $1,493

Town of Edmonston for expanding the tree canopy in Edmonston through a community tree planting initiative. $1,250

Towson University for third to fifth graders from Baltimore City to participate in a virtual six-week series dedicated to investigating Chesapeake Bay science and conservation. $1,219

Community Engagement and Restoration Mini Grants

This program is designed to engage Maryland residents in activities that enhance communities, engage residents, and improve natural resources by funding small-scale activities such as tree plantings, rain gardens, and community cleanups, among others. For information about this grant program click here.

Bolton Hill Community Association for native plantings at the Contee-Parago Park, commemorating two African American Baltimore City residents. $4,595

Cape Conservation Corps for the removal of invasive bushkiller vine at the “Serene Ravine” community space. $3,500

Chesapeake Education Arts Research Society (CHEARS) for eight sustainable and equitable food systems workshops and citizen science stream health and soil erosion monitoring. $4,314

Cobb Island Citizens Association for the removal of invasive vines by goats on a community-owned lot. $4,885

Elevation Ministries, Inc. for a series of events on environmental awareness days, to promote sustainable daily practices. $4,800

Friends of Garrett Park for the construction of the “Bio-Biggy,” a mobile science display and learning center. $4,807

National Wildlife Federation for community days focused on maintenance and building stewardship of a local park. $5,000

Nature Worx, Inc. for nature-based sessions at Masonville Cove to promote wellness and build stewardship among local residents. $5,000

One Annapolis Inc for pollinator plantings and creation of a garden space in the Bywater Mutual Homes community. $3,000

Saint Rose of Lima Parish for a demonstration garden, faith-based watershed restoration workshops, and two plant giveaways. $4,500

Shoreham Beach Citizens’ Association for two pollinator gardens and signage to increase awareness on the importance of native plants. $3,550

Town of Thurmont for a rain barrel giveaway and workshop on residential stormwater management. $1,500

Green Streets, Green Jobs, Green Towns

This program is designed to help communities develop and implement plans that reduce stormwater runoff, increase the number and amount of green spaces in urban areas, improve the health of local streams and the Chesapeake Bay, and enhance quality of life and community livability. For information about this grant program, click here.

Borough of Chambersburg for green infrastructure practices in Chambersburg, Pennsylvania. $150,000

City Neighbors Foundation for green infrastructure practices in North East Baltimore City, Maryland. $148,883

City of Romney for green infrastructure practices in the City of Romney, West Virginia. $118,555

Druid Heights Community Development Corporation for green infrastructure engineered designs in the Druid Heights Community in Baltimore City, Maryland. $29,998

James River Association for green infrastructure practices in in the Lakemont neighborhood of Petersburg, Virginia. $118,146

Joe’s Movement Emporium/World Arts Focus for green infrastructure practices in Mount Rainier, Maryland. $150,000

Midshore Riverkeeper Conservancy, Inc. for a green infrastructure engineered design for the Town of Preston, Maryland. $24,122

The Community Ecology Institute for green infrastructure practices at Atholton High School in Columbia, Maryland. $108,650

Town of Emmitsburg for green infrastructure practices in Emmitsburg, Maryland. $121,400

Town of Galena for a green infrastructure engineered design for the Town of Galena, Maryland. $30,000

Town of Glen Echo for a green infrastructure engineered design for the Town of Glen Echo, Maryland. $28,271

Town of Millington for a green infrastructure concept design for the Town of Millington, Maryland. $9,995

Watershed Alliance of York (WAY), Inc. for a white paper on engaging Homeowner Associations in stormwater management. $20,700

Outdoor Learning Network Initiative

The goal of this initiative is to advance environmental literacy at the district level by establishing local networks comprised of school districts and organizations who are committed to partnering and working collectively to embed environmental education into the school system long-term. For more information about this grant program click here.

Living Classrooms Foundation for support of a collaborative network focused on integration of systemic environmental literacy in Baltimore City Public Schools. $149,970

Local Concepts LLC for network development support for the Regional Outdoor Learning Network. $70,000

Old Dominion University Research Foundation for support of a collaborative network, the Southeastern Virginia Environmental Education (SEVEE) Consortium, focused on integration of systemic environmental literacy at local school districts. $150,000

Sponsorship

This program aims to support events that will increase awareness or knowledge on issues pertaining to restoration and protection of the Chesapeake Bay region natural resources and/or promote the Trust’s major sources of revenue. For information about this program click here.

Annapolis Film Festival Inc. for support of the sailing showcase portion of the film festival. $1,250

Center for Watershed Protection, Inc. for a solutions-oriented forum for watershed and stormwater professionals on emerging and persistent watershed issues. $1,000

End Time Harvest Ministries for the 2022 Graduation Scholarship Banquet, celebrating Port Towns Youth Council graduates. $1,000

Audubon Naturalist Society of the Central Atlantic States, Inc. for support of the fourth Naturally Latinos and fifth Taking Nature Black conferences. $2,500

Forever Maryland Foundation for a conference on the current state of Chesapeake Bay restoration and future climate adaptations. $500

National Wildlife Federation for the 2022 Choose Clean Water Coalition Conference, to bring stakeholders together for learning and networking. $500

Neighborhood Creative Arts Center for support of NatureFest 2022, a community festival with hands-on engagement in natural resource topics. $700

Veteran's Engagement Mini Grant Program

The Veteran’s Engagement Mini Grant Program is designed to support veteran’s groups and organizations engaging veteran’s groups as they provide healing and therapeutic services, outdoor recreation, community engagement, and green jobs training. For information about this program, click here.

Audubon Naturalist Society of the Central Atlantic States, Inc. for green jobs training, environmental education, and healing for 75 veterans. $4,999

Cheverly American Legion Post 108 for invasive species removal and the creation of a green space for veterans to connect. $4,328

Friends of the Patapsco Valley State Park for camping supplies to increase the accessibility for disabled veterans to the Hilton and Hollofield campsites. $4,988

God’s Outdoor Angels Foundation for four outdoor experiences with a total of ten disabled veterans. $5,000

Warrior Canine Connection for a Tough Mudder event hosted for 50 veterans and their service dogs. $4,500

Youth Environmental Education Grant Program

This program is designed to increase student awareness and involvement in the restoration and protection of our region’s natural resources by increasing access to programs that provide Meaningful Watershed Educational Experiences (MWEEs). For information about this grant program click here.

Baltimore Lab School: for 116 students to participate in the Watershed Stewards Program. $5,000.

Belvedere Elementary School: for fifth grade students to participate in a watershed investigation and action project in their community. $4,731.

Beyond Boundaries: for an outdoor experiences for James River High School students with disabilities. $5,000.

Booker T. Washington Middle School: for teacher professional development at the Ecological School located on Presquile Island. $4,470.

Bridges Public Charter School: for the design and installation of an outdoor education space with a native pollinator garden. $6,089.

Community Foundation of the Central Blue Ridge (fiscal sponsor for Jones Gardens): for installation of a community garden park to increase native pollinator habitat and local access to affordable fresh food. $5,000.

Endangered Species Coalition: for professional development training for teachers at Sacred Heart Catholic School in District of Columbia. $5,000.

Fairfax County Park Foundation Inc.,: for 4th and 5th grade students at Title I schools in Fairfax County, Virginia to participate in watershed investigations. $5,000.

Friends of Oxon Run Park: for an environmental investigation program at Oxon Run Park. $5,000.

Green Muslims: for 45 elementary and middle school students to investigate local watershed health and its connect with the Islamic faith. $7,000.

Green Street Academy: for the installation of an outdoor classroom and enhancement of native pollinator habitat. $5,000.

James River Association: for youth from Richmond and Petersburg to participate in two, week-long summer programs focused on wetlands and the Chesapeake Bay watershed. $7,000.

James River Association: for 7th graders from Hampton City Schools to participate in two, week-long summer programs focused on the wetlands and the Chesapeake Bay watershed. $7,000.

Maryland Environmental Service: for 12 students to participate in a 5-day program focused on local bird populations and the impacts of habitat loss. $8,500.

Montessori School of Westminster: for the conversion of a shed to an outdoor classroom. $7,122.

Severn River Association, Inc.: for youth from Annapolis Recreation and Parks summer camp to participate in the Floating Classroom program. $6,500.

Smithsonian Institution Affiliations Program: for Chesapeake Math and IT Academy students to participate in a watershed investigation and implement an improvement project in their community. $5,500.

The Delmarva Community Wellnet Foundation; EDEN Project: for construction of an outdoor classroom at North Georgetown Elementary. $6,000.

The SEED School of Maryland: for 25 middle and high school students to participate in an afterschool garden club. $5,000.

Urban Learning and Teaching Center: for 80 students from District of Columbia to investigate the health of the Anacostia River. $7,000.

June 2022

Ditch the Disposables

This program supports food serving entities, School Food Authorities, and Community Based Organizations that support schools in the District to reduce food packaging and food waste, in an effort to support a long-term transition to reusables. For information about this award program, click here.

American University for 5,000 reusable to-go containers for student use at the dining hall, eliminating 2,571 lbs of waste per semester. $24,750.

Army Distaff Foundation for reusable containers to be used by 170 residents at an independent living care facility, which will prevent 8,760 lbs/year of waste. $11,855.

B.Lin Catering for a transition to reusable catering supplies, dishware, and an energy efficient dishwasher that will result in 1,000 lb/year in waste reduction. $9,000.

Big Bear Cafe for the purchase of reusable foodware and a dishwasher, with the goal of reducing waste by 60%. $25,000.

Culture Coffee Too LLC for a reusable take-out program and associated marketing campaign. $5,875.

Department of Youth Rehabilitation Services for the creation of a Mobile Food Service Station to educate 650 students, increase food choice, and reduce school food waste. $16,721.

FishScale Inc for an 80% conversion of disposable to reusable takeout containers and design of an associated customer loyalty app. $11,250.

Girls Global Academy Charter School for the creation of a focus group to determine which meals students are most likely to consume in order to reduce food waste $5,000.

Lee Montessori PCS for a transition to family style reusable foodware for 400 students on both campuses and to support a compost program. $9,000.

Lutheran Church of the Reformation for a dishwasher for the congregation’s kitchen, which will support an elimination of 3,900 lbs/year of waste. $5,637.

Market 7 for reusable drinkware and a dishwasher to support a food hall, reducing waste by 50% while educating the community. $25,000.

NPB Group LLC for reusable foodware, a dishwasher that will reduce water and energy by 50%, and a field trip for staff to a water treatment facility. $15,377.

Teaism for the implementation of a to-go cup pilot program for regular customers. $5,142.

Temple Micah for a dishwasher and 200 sets of reusable dinnerware for Temple events, with an elimination of 180 lbs/year of disposable items. $8,641.

Thrive DC for reusable dishes and a dishwasher to support a program giving free meals to in-need people, eliminating 78,000 single use dishware items per year. $24,200.

Valley Brook Tea for 100 mugs, 300 takeout travel mugs, and a dishwasher which will reduce disposables by 90%. $13,650.

Washington DC Asian Food Corp. for a reusable take-out and delivery program and dishwasher, which will result in an 85% reduction in waste. $24,700.

Chesapeake Conservation Corps Members in Prince George’s County

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On August 17, 2021, the Chesapeake Bay Trust welcomed the newest cohort of Chesapeake Conservation Corps members and celebrated graduating members. The Chesapeake Conservation Corps program aims to invest in young people, provide valuable job skills training, and promote a green economy. The program matches young people ages 18-25 with non-profit and government organizations for one-year stipend-supported terms of service, focused on improving local communities and protecting natural resources.

This year, 33 new Corps members were placed with 31 host organizations throughout the state of Maryland, as well as a host site in Pennsylvania. During their year of service, Corps members will work with their host organizations to gain valuable on-the-job experience as they work to advance environmental conservation, K-12 education, energy efficiency programs, sustainable agriculture practices, and a host of other environmentally focused initiatives.

Five of the incoming Corps members will be working with Prince George’s County-based organizations located in Accokeek, Brandywine, Edmonston, Laurel, and Riverdale. Learn more below about the exciting work the Corps members will take on in the coming year!

Kathryn Burcham, Prince George’s County Public Schools, William S. Schmidt Outdoor Education Center
Brandywine
Kathryn will serve her year at The Schmidt Center leading students and teachers to implement environmental lessons, conduct field restoration projects, practice animal care, facilitate team building, and assist with professional development opportunities for teachers. Prior to joining the Corps, Kathryn graduated from St. Mary’s College of Maryland with a bachelor’s degree in Biology. Kathryn is looking forward to building meaningful connections and gaining new experiences through the Corps.

Andrew Rapp, U.S. Geological Survey: Patuxent Wildlife Research Center
Laurel
Andrew will serve his year with the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center and will focus on monitoring a variety of avian species on Poplar Island and as well as method development (unmanned aircraft systems and thermal imaging). Andrew recently graduated from the College of William and Mary with a double major in Biology and Environmental Science & Policy. Andrew spent his summer as a first mate on a fishing boat off the coast of Cape Hatteras, North Carolina to learn about seabirds, marine mammals, and fisheries.

Jack Ruszkowski, Accokeek Foundation
Accokeek
During his year Jack will work as the Pasture Restoration Specialist with the Accokeek Foundation. Jack will spend time sampling and identifying native and invasive plant species within livestock pastures, mapping plant species sampled using ArcGIS, and developing and implementing an integrated livestock plan for invasive species management and pasture restoration. Jack is a recent graduate from the College of William and Mary with a degree in Anthropology. He has an interest in agriculture and forestry projects, particularly those relating to soil health and sustainable agriculture.

Bethany Sims, Town of Edmonston
Edmonston
Bethany will spend her year with the Town of Edmonston where she will focus on community engagement and education programs for the residents of Edmonston. She will also be involved with development of environmental policy for the Town and will work with the urban forestry and energy programs. Bethany has a bachelor’s degree in Environmental Studies and a minor in Political Studies from Towson University. She is driven by the need to protect vulnerable animals and preserve their habitat. In her free time, Bethany loves painting and drawing scenes.

Sally Watanabe, ECO City Farms
Riverdale
Sally will spend her year in the Corps with ECO City Farms. She will cultivate sustainably grown food year-round; turn local food waste into rich compost; educate local youth and families about food, health, and the environment; engage in hands-on trainings and permaculture projects on the farm; and be involved in outreach and community organizing for urban farming/environmental restoration. Sally recently graduated from the University of Richmond with a degree in Psychology. She is passionate about sustainability, social justice, and nurturing the relationship between people and nature/animals. Other passions of Sally include music, anything outdoors, yoga, painting, and exploring spirituality.

Congratulations to the incoming 2021-2022 cohort and the graduated alumni! Learn more about this year’s full cohort here.

2021-2022 Chesapeake Conservation Corps Class Announced

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2021-2022 Chesapeake Conservation Corps Class Announced

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: Contact: Jana Davis, 410-974-2941 ext. 100, jdavis@cbtrust.org

(Annapolis, MD) August 17, 2021– Today the Chesapeake Bay Trust, funded by the Maryland Chesapeake vehicle license plate among other sources, introduced the newest class of its Chesapeake Conservation Corps members. This program was created by the late Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller, Jr., and others in the Maryland General Assembly to invest in the state’s young people, provide valuable job skills training, and promote the green economy in Maryland. The program matches young people ages 18-25 with non-profit and government organizations for one-year stipend-supported terms of service, focused on improving local communities and protecting natural resources. The Chesapeake Bay Trust administers the program.

“We need all hands on deck to protect the Chesapeake Bay and preserve this national treasure for generations to come. The Chesapeake Conservation Corps program, created by my good friend Senate President Mike Miller, is key to launching the next generation of Maryland leaders through environmental workforce development and creating pathways to good-paying green jobs. Today we celebrate this new class of young leaders ready to take action by working to protect our environment. This program is central to our efforts to maintain a healthy Bay and a strong Maryland economy, and I know the work of these leaders will help continue to carry out Mike’s legacy of environmental stewardship,” said Senator Van Hollen.

Since the program began in 2010 with an inaugural class of 16 members, the Corps has increased in size due to its popularity among young people pursing environmental interests and the organizations that host Corps members each year. The Corps has become a premier launching pad for green careers and a reliable resource for environmentally focused organizations who are recruiting the next generation of environmental professionals. Close to 300 alums have become both leaders in the environmental movement as well as, just as importantly, engaged individuals bringing a stewardship ethic to non-environmental careers. Many of them are hired by their host organizations following their years of service.

“The Chesapeake Conservation Corps program is such a fantastic way for young people to start their careers,” said Senator Sarah Elfreth, who has been appointed by the Maryland Senate President to serve on the Corps Advisory Board. “We in the General Assembly cannot wait to see what these Corps members accomplish this year and beyond.”

Today, 33 Corps members met virtually their 31 host organizations to learn more about their job responsibilities for the upcoming year. During their year of service, Corps members will gain valuable on-the-job experience as they work to advance environmental conservation, K-12 education, energy efficiency programs, sustainable agriculture practices, and a host of other environmentally focused initiatives.

Funds for the program are provided by the Chesapeake Bay Trust, the Maryland Department of Natural Resources, the U.S. National Park Service, and Baltimore Gas and Electric (BGE), among others.

“BGE is very proud to support the Chesapeake Conservation Corps Program. Not only does the program prepare our youth with heightened awareness and skills to conserve our natural resources and protect the environment, but it develops our local workforce in a meaningful and unique way. At BGE, we believe that cultivating a talented, diverse workforce that can serve the state’s needs is critical, and this program has successfully prepared hundreds of new members of our workforce over its 12-year history” said Alex Núñez, senior vice president of BGE’s Strategy and Regulatory Affairs and Chesapeake Bay Trust Trustee.

During the year, Corps participants work directly with their host organizations while also receiving extensive job trainings hosted by the Trust as well as other service-learning opportunities including grant writing and project management.

“One aspect I love about this program is that not only does it create life-changing experiences for the Corps members, but it can really help the host organizations’ abilities to accomplish their missions,” said Dr. Jana Davis, executive director of the Chesapeake Bay Trust. “We have a wide range of not-for-profits who benefit, from small to large, and those with primarily environmental missions as well as those without.”

Of the 33 selected participants, 12 will work in Anne Arundel County, 6 in Baltimore City, 5 in Prince George’s County, 5 in Howard County, 2 in Calvert County; and 1 each in Montgomery County, Worcester County, and Pennsylvania.

About the Chesapeake Bay Trust
The Chesapeake Bay Trust (www.cbtrust.org) is a nonprofit grant-making organization established by the Maryland General Assembly dedicated to improving the natural resources of the Chesapeake region through environmental education, community engagement, and local watershed restoration. The Trust’s grantees engage hundreds of thousands of individuals annually in projects that have a measurable impact on the waterways and other natural resources of the region. The Trust is supported by the sale of the Maryland Treasure the Chesapeake license plate; donations to the Chesapeake Bay and Endangered Species Fund on the Maryland State income tax form; donations made by hunters, fishers, and boaters in the Maryland online natural resource licensing system; donations from individuals and corporations; and partnerships with private foundations and federal, state, and local governments that enable grant-making watershed-wide. The Trust has received the highest rating from Charity Navigator for over two decades: On average, 90% of the Trust’s expenditures are directed to its restoration and education programs.

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Chesapeake Conservation Corps 2021-2022 Corps Member Placements

Allyson Bartell, Maryland Department of Natural Resources: Resource Assessment Service

Annapolis, Anne Arundel County

Allyson “Ally” will serve her year at Maryland Department of Natural Resources, where she will assist in measuring stream and storm flow and conducting geomorphological surveys, as well as water quality data collection and analysis. She will also compile stream restoration monitoring data and interpret results which will be shared with many audiences. Ally is a recent graduate from Johns Hopkins University where she earned a B.S. in Environmental Science. Ally’s favorite classes included sustainable food systems, Inca art history, and environmental anthropology; in her free time, you can find her hiking, gardening, and reading.

Jack Beckham, Severn River Association

Annapolis, Anne Arundel County

Jack is coming from Boston College to join the Corps. He recently graduated with a degree in Environmental Studies and a minor in Hispanic Studies. Jack previously interned at Resources Environmental Services and is a big runner and outdoors enthusiast. During his Corps year Jack will assist with weekly water quality monitoring, and an on-the-water Floating Classroom educational program. Jack will also coordinate volunteers on a variety of monitoring activities, develop watershed assessments of the Severn River and obtain a Maryland Boating License.

Clara Brill-Carlat, American Chestnut Land Trust

Prince Frederick, Calvert County

During her placement at American Chestnut Land Trust Clara will focus on science and restoration. She will work with and lead volunteer groups in various land management activities including invasive species removal, meadow establishment, hiking trail maintenance, property monitoring, and forest and wildlife diversity surveys. Clara recently graduated from Smith College with a degree in geology. She is a native Baltimorean and is excited to contribute to the conservation of Maryland’s natural resources. In her free time, she likes to go on long walks and write limericks.

Kathryn Burcham, Prince George’s County Public Schools, William S. Schmidt Outdoor Education Center

Brandywine, Prince George’s County

Kathryn will serve her year at The Schmidt Center leading students and teachers to implement environmental lessons, conduct field restoration projects, practice animal care, facilitate team building, and assist with professional development opportunities for teachers. Prior to joining the Corps, Kathryn graduated from St. Mary’s College of Maryland with a bachelor’s degree in Biology. Kathryn is looking forward to building meaningful connections and gaining new experiences through the Corps.

Lucy Burnam, The Community Ecology Institute

Columbia, Howard County

Lucy recently graduated from the University of Mississippi with a degree in Journalism and a focus on photography, videography, and marketing. Lucy spent the summer in Hawaii on a sustainable coffee farm learning about their process, and how to harvest pineapples, mangos, cacao, and ice cream beans. During her Corps year Lucy will assist at the Institute’s new urban organic farm tending the farm and gardens using regenerative agriculture principles and will be coordinating among the local community organizations.

Selina Cheng, Maryland Department of Natural Resources: Resource Assessment Service

Annapolis, Anne Arundel County

During her year in the Corps Selina will support the Maryland Department of Natural Resources’ freshwater mussel restoration project by conducting field surveys, producing and culturing mussels in a hatchery, collecting data, conducting feasibility studies, and developing new outreach material to highlight conservation efforts. Selina will be moving back east from Alaska to join the Corps; in Alaska, she assisted with long-term monitoring of Arctic lakes. Selina attended the University of Virginia where she recently received a dual degree in Environmental Science and English.

Joshua Cohen, Interfaith Partners for the Chesapeake

Annapolis, Anne Arundel County

Joshua is a recent graduate from Washington College where he earned a degree in Environmental Science and minored in Chesapeake Regional Studies and Music. He has spent time this year working in Arizona at a nature center, with Habitat for Humanity in North Carolina, and at outdoor conference centers in Kansas, on top of helping with the vaccination effort in Albany. This year he will lead online and in-person educational events and coordinate volunteer involvement in restoration projects for Interfaith Partners for the Chesapeake (IPC). Joshua will also help coordinate IPC’s One Water Partnership.

Virginia Davis, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Patuxent Research Refuge

Laurel, Anne Arundel County

Virginia “Genny” grew up in Richmond, Virginia and attended school at Warren Wilson College where she majored in Environmental Studies and minored in Environmental Policy. Genny says that growing up in the Chesapeake Bay watershed has shaped her love of the outdoors and that she is excited to begin to explore Maryland. While at the Patuxent Research Refuge Genny will work on partnership development and environmental education in the urban corridor between Baltimore and Washington, DC. She will also work to foster meaningful adoption by the Refuge of best practices for urban engagement under four Critical Engagement Elements in the Urban Wildlife Conservation Program Strategic Plan (Community-focused, Intentional, Inclusive, Collaborative).

Laura Exar, Anne Arundel County Department of Recreation and Parks, Jug Bay Wetlands Sanctuary

Lothian, Anne Arundel County

Laura will work with Jug Bay in creating a sensory garden, supporting invasive species control efforts, designing and conducting a community science herpetological survey, and promoting outdoor environmental education through classrooms in the field. Laura recently graduated from the University of Maryland, College Park where she studied Environmental Science and Policy with a concentration in Marine and Coastal Management and a minor in Sustainability Studies. She hopes to go on to pursue a Master’s in marine and estuarine science. Prior to the Corps, she worked at the National Aquarium in Baltimore.

Avery Farrell, Howard County Office of Community Sustainability

Ellicott City, Howard County

Avery “Ave”, who majored in Geography and Environmental Science at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County, hopes to gain knowledge about climate change mitigation during her time in the Corps. She likes to walk/hike, crochet, create YouTube videos and in the spring and summer watch thunderstorms. While at Howard County’s Office of Community Sustainability for her year with the Corps, Ave will work to engage county employees, businesses, and residents in saving energy, reducing litter, and combatting climate change.

Christy Ferguson, The Community Ecology Institute

Columbia, Howard County

Christy graduated from the University of Maryland, Baltimore County with a major in Environmental Science and Geography. Christy spent the summer learning about environmental education programs, restoration monitoring, wildlife surveys, and water quality monitoring with the Maryland Coastal Bays Program. This year Christy will support the Institute’s educational programming at the intersections of environment, health, and equity and will coordinate garden installations at several community locations.

Quinae West, Towson University (Center for STEM Excellence)

Baltimore City

Quinae was recently married and is a proud mom. She is currently working on her associate degree from Harford Community College. She has a passion for environmental science and has particular interest in learning about habitat restoration, sustainability, and marine conservation. During her time with Towson University’s Center for STEM Excellence, Quinae will develop activities and facilitate programs designed to foster a sense of stewardship of the Chesapeake Bay in Maryland’s K-12 students.

Jacob Honn, National Aquarium

Baltimore City

During the course of Jacob’s year, he will assist with the Aquarium’s activities and programs designed to stop plastic pollution, combat climate change, save wildlife, and restore habitats. Jacob graduated from Earlham College in Indiana with a degree in biology and even spent a semester abroad in New Zealand. He spent the last year managing Maryland Environmental Trust’s volunteer easement monitoring program. He has recently gotten into mycology, birding, and gardening and spends a lot of time outdoors.

Mary Hoover, American Chestnut Land Trust

Prince Frederick, Calvert County

Mary will assist with the American Chestnut Land Trust’s one-acre sustainable agriculture farm as farm manager and will support farm-related community outreach. She will also participate in the Maryland Master Naturalist program. Mary was born and raised in Omaha Nebraska and will be joining the Corps following a summer working on an organic strawberry farm in Vermont. She is a recent graduate from Creighton University where she earned a degree in Environmental Science and minored in Sustainability Studies and Spanish. In her free time, Mary likes hiking, thrifting, playing soccer and tennis, and hanging out with her cat.

Kathryn Kavanagh, Maryland Coastal Bays Program

Berlin, Worcester County

Kathryn “Katie” will work with the science and restoration staff on water quality monitoring, oyster gardening, wetland monitoring, anadromous fish sampling, and restoration project construction. She will also work in education designing and leading meaningful educational programs, field excursions, and activities in and around the watershed. Katie graduated from Lafayette College in PA with a dual degree in Environmental Science and International Affairs. She loves working with kids and has a background in environmental education. Mary is working at Schuylkill Center in Philadelphia this summer.

Spencer Kessinger, Robinson Nature Center

Columbia, Howard County

Spencer will serve her year at Robinson Nature Center where she will learn to teach educational programs to people of all ages, take care of a live animal collection, and learn about all the behind the scenes work that makes a large nature center run smoothly. Spencer is a recent graduate from St. Mary’s College of Maryland with a degree in Environmental Studies and minors in Biology and Education. Spencer likes walking/hiking, snuggling with her dogs, kayaking, and learning about pollinators.

James Looper, U.S. National Park Service Fort McHenry National Monument and Historic Shrine

Baltimore City

At the National Park Service James “Jimmy” will be researching Chesapeake Bay climate change data, creating and implementing an interpretative program related to climate change, analyzing Trail GIS data and creating maps; and participating in outreach events. Jimmy graduated from Washington College with a double major in Environmental Studies and Anthropology and has formerly worked at the National Aquarium in Baltimore and with NOAA in the Pacific Northwest.

Amelia Lowe, Chesapeake Conservancy

Annapolis, Anne Arundel County

During her year of service Amelia will be a key member of the Chesapeake Conservation Partnership dedicated to meeting the Bay Program’s land conservation goals and new goals to conserve 30% of lands in the watershed by 2030. She will learn and contribute to many cutting-edge policies and programs. Amelia is a recent graduate from the College of William and Mary where she double majored in Environmental Science & Policy and History. Her career interests include sustainable urban development, science communication, and corporate sustainability. On Sunday mornings you can find her at the Dupont Circle Farmer’s Market.

Lorenzo Mack-Johnson, Waterfront Partnership of Baltimore

Baltimore City

During Lorenzo’s year in the Corps he will learn about local clean water issues, engage diverse public audiences, and conduct field work at the waterfront and in East Baltimore neighborhoods through the Waterfront Partnership’s Healthy Harbors Initiative. Lorenzo is completing his bachelor’s degree in Environmental Sustainability from the University of Baltimore. He is working to become a Maryland Master Naturalist and is excited about the community engagement and oyster restoration work he will be involved in.

Declan Murphy, Howard County Conservancy

Woodstock, Howard County

Declan will plan and execute environmental program activities for K-12 school programs, a summer nature camp, and the Conservancy’s brand-new nature preschool. Additionally, he will oversee daily care and educational presentations of nature center animals including the barred owl, eastern black rat snake, terrapin, chickens, and goats. Declan recently graduated from Swarthmore College with a degree in Environmental Studies and Biology. This summer, Declan is collecting data on Philadelphia’s new plastic bag ban.

Julissa Murrieta, The Nature Conservancy

Bethesda, Montgomery County
Julie graduated from the University of Maryland, College Park with a degree in Biological Sciences with a concentration in Ecology and Evolution and a minor in Sustainability Studies. In her free time, she enjoys hiking, reading, embroidery, puzzling, and snuggling with her cat. For her year with the Corps, Julissa’s work will range from researching forest health and resilience in the Central Appalachians to blue carbon and coastal resiliency on the Eastern Shore. She will even learn how to execute controlled burning.

Christopher Orozco-Fletcher, U.S. National Park Service Chesapeake Bay

Annapolis, Anne Arundel County

During his placement with the National Park Service, Christopher will staff the “Chesapeake Roving Ranger” mobile interpretive vehicle and will develop and conduct interpretive outreach and educational programming to promote the understanding and stewardship of the cultural, natural, recreational, and historic resources of the Chesapeake Bay watershed. Christopher is a recent college graduate from Earlham College in Indiana where he studied Environmental Sustainability with a focus in Resource Conservation. Christopher is a proud Eagle Scout and enjoys contra dancing, drawing, hiking, ultimate frisbee, biking, and traveling.

Pamela Pina, Maryland Environmental Service

Millersville, Anne Arundel County

During her year of service Pamela will work with the Geospatial and Engineering Service’s division at Maryland Environmental Service and learn how GIS can be utilized in a multitude of situations for planning, implementing, and evaluating stormwater projects throughout the State. Pamela is a graduate from the University of Maryland, Baltimore County with a degree in Environmental Science and Geography. She has previously done work with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and enjoys walking and playing with her puppy in her free time.

Andrew Rapp, U.S. Geological Survey: Patuxent Wildlife Research Center

Laurel, Prince George’s County

Andrew will serve his year with the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center and will focus on monitoring a variety of avian species on Poplar Island and as well as method development (unmanned aircraft systems and thermal imaging). Andrew recently graduated from the College of William and Mary with a double major in Biology and Environmental Science & Policy. Andrew spent his summer as a first mate on a fishing boat off the coast of Cape Hatteras, North Carolina to learn about seabirds, marine mammals, and fisheries.

Jack Ruszkowski, Accokeek Foundation

Accokeek, Prince George’s County

During his year Jack will work as the Pasture Restoration Specialist with the Accokeek Foundation. Jack will spend time sampling and identifying native and invasive plant species within livestock pastures, mapping plant species sampled using ArcGIS, and developing and implementing an integrated livestock plan for invasive species management and pasture restoration. Jack is a recent graduate from the College of William and Mary with a degree in Anthropology. He has an interest in agriculture and forestry projects, particularly those relating to soil health and sustainable agriculture.

Bethany Sims, Town of Edmonston

Edmonston, Prince George’s County

Bethany will spend her year with the Town of Edmonston where she will focus on community engagement and education programs for the residents of Edmonston. She will also be involved with development of environmental policy for the Town and will work with the urban forestry and energy programs. Bethany has a bachelor’s degree in Environmental Studies and a minor in Political Studies from Towson University. She is driven by the need to protect vulnerable animals and preserve their habitat. In her free time, Bethany loves painting and drawing scenes.

Caroline Spiccioli, Maryland Department of the Environment

Baltimore City

During her year in the Corps Caroline will work with the Maryland Department of the Environment non-point source watershed planning program to develop or update watershed plans that meet EPA requirements. Caroline has a bachelor’s degree in Environmental Studies from The University of Vermont in Burlington Vermont. Caroline is interested in climate resilience and hopes to influence the way urban communities’ function to incorporate climate and environmental justice policies.

Samina Soin-Voshell, Maryland Department of Natural Resources: Chesapeake Bay Natural Estuarine Research Reserve

Annapolis, Anne Arundel County

Working with the Chesapeake Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve this year, Samina will build estuarine and environmental literacy through programs with teachers, students, and communities that will connect them to the Bay and move them to take action toward its protection and restoration. Samina graduated from Washington College with a dual degree in Environmental Science and Biology with a minor in Chesapeake Regional Studies.

Shannon Thomas, Chesapeake Conservancy

Selinsgrove, Pennsylvania

Shannon will work with the Chesapeake Conservancy at Susquehanna University during her year with the Corps, where she will grow a new program using the latest innovations in riparian forest buffer science to improve creeks and streams. She will also train students and partners to use geospatial data to identify where restoration will make the biggest water quality impacts. Shannon recently graduated from Washington College with a degree in Environmental Science and minors in Chesapeake Bay Regional Studies and Chemistry.

Devin Valcich, U.S. National Park Service Chesapeake Bay

Annapolis, Anne Arundel County

Devin earned her bachelor’s degree from Washington College in Environmental Studies and a minor in Chesapeake Regional Studies. She was able to study abroad during college in Ireland, Belize, and Guatemala. Throughout the next year Devin will staff the “Chesapeake Roving Ranger” mobile interpretive vehicle and will develop and conduct interpretive outreach and educational programming to promote the understanding and stewardship of the cultural, natural, recreational, and historic resources of the Chesapeake Bay watershed.

Sally Watanabe, ECO City Farms

Riverdale, Prince George’s County

Sally will spend her year in the Corps with ECO City Farms. She will cultivate sustainably grown food year-round; turn local food waste into rich compost; educate local youth and families about food, health, and the environment; engage in hands-on trainings and permaculture projects on the farm; and be involved in outreach and community organizing for urban farming/environmental restoration. Sally recently graduated from the University of Richmond with a degree in Psychology. She is passionate about sustainability, social justice, and nurturing the relationship between people and nature/animals. Other passions of Sally include music, anything outdoors, yoga, painting, and exploring spirituality.

Lexi Watson, Maryland Department of the Environment

Baltimore City

Lexi recently graduated from Old Dominion University in Norfolk Virginia with a degree in Marine Biology and a minor in Conservation Leadership. Over the summer, Lexi is working with the Kiawah Conservancy in South Carolina. In her free time, she likes hiking/ camping, surfing/ paddle boarding, snorkeling, reading, and dancing. This year with the Maryland Department of the Environment, Lexi will build off a previous Corps Member’s data collection and analysis of living shorelines by compiling the data into a GIS format that can be linked to a GIS data layer (for mapping). She will also expand data collection and analysis of living shoreline projects that impacted submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV) and evaluate the long-term impacts on SAV. Finally, Lexi will evaluate the impacts of home values related to living shoreline vs. hardened shoreline installation.

Rylee Wernoch, Smithsonian Environmental Research Center

Edgewater, Anne Arundel County

During her year at The Smithsonian Environmental Research Center (SERC), Rylee will work to understand the interests of local stakeholder and community organizations and identify areas of overlap between those needs and SERC’s scientific expertise. Rylee will work with SERC researchers and public engagement staff to plan and develop community-scientist partnerships and will gain experience with public engagement in science, science communication, and project development. Rylee recently graduated from Hobart and William Smith Colleges with degrees in Biology and Environmental Studies and a minor in Africana Studies. Rylee is interested in scientific communication, environmental justice and marine conservation and is spending the summer as a head instructor of a junior sailing program.

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