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Chesapeake Conservation Corps Members in Prince George’s County

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On August 17, 2021, the Chesapeake Bay Trust welcomed the newest cohort of Chesapeake Conservation Corps members and celebrated graduating members. The Chesapeake Conservation Corps program aims to invest in young people, provide valuable job skills training, and promote a green economy. The program matches young people ages 18-25 with non-profit and government organizations for one-year stipend-supported terms of service, focused on improving local communities and protecting natural resources.

This year, 33 new Corps members were placed with 31 host organizations throughout the state of Maryland, as well as a host site in Pennsylvania. During their year of service, Corps members will work with their host organizations to gain valuable on-the-job experience as they work to advance environmental conservation, K-12 education, energy efficiency programs, sustainable agriculture practices, and a host of other environmentally focused initiatives.

Five of the incoming Corps members will be working with Prince George’s County-based organizations located in Accokeek, Brandywine, Edmonston, Laurel, and Riverdale. Learn more below about the exciting work the Corps members will take on in the coming year!

Kathryn Burcham, Prince George’s County Public Schools, William S. Schmidt Outdoor Education Center
Brandywine
Kathryn will serve her year at The Schmidt Center leading students and teachers to implement environmental lessons, conduct field restoration projects, practice animal care, facilitate team building, and assist with professional development opportunities for teachers. Prior to joining the Corps, Kathryn graduated from St. Mary’s College of Maryland with a bachelor’s degree in Biology. Kathryn is looking forward to building meaningful connections and gaining new experiences through the Corps.

Andrew Rapp, U.S. Geological Survey: Patuxent Wildlife Research Center
Laurel
Andrew will serve his year with the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center and will focus on monitoring a variety of avian species on Poplar Island and as well as method development (unmanned aircraft systems and thermal imaging). Andrew recently graduated from the College of William and Mary with a double major in Biology and Environmental Science & Policy. Andrew spent his summer as a first mate on a fishing boat off the coast of Cape Hatteras, North Carolina to learn about seabirds, marine mammals, and fisheries.

Jack Ruszkowski, Accokeek Foundation
Accokeek
During his year Jack will work as the Pasture Restoration Specialist with the Accokeek Foundation. Jack will spend time sampling and identifying native and invasive plant species within livestock pastures, mapping plant species sampled using ArcGIS, and developing and implementing an integrated livestock plan for invasive species management and pasture restoration. Jack is a recent graduate from the College of William and Mary with a degree in Anthropology. He has an interest in agriculture and forestry projects, particularly those relating to soil health and sustainable agriculture.

Bethany Sims, Town of Edmonston
Edmonston
Bethany will spend her year with the Town of Edmonston where she will focus on community engagement and education programs for the residents of Edmonston. She will also be involved with development of environmental policy for the Town and will work with the urban forestry and energy programs. Bethany has a bachelor’s degree in Environmental Studies and a minor in Political Studies from Towson University. She is driven by the need to protect vulnerable animals and preserve their habitat. In her free time, Bethany loves painting and drawing scenes.

Sally Watanabe, ECO City Farms
Riverdale
Sally will spend her year in the Corps with ECO City Farms. She will cultivate sustainably grown food year-round; turn local food waste into rich compost; educate local youth and families about food, health, and the environment; engage in hands-on trainings and permaculture projects on the farm; and be involved in outreach and community organizing for urban farming/environmental restoration. Sally recently graduated from the University of Richmond with a degree in Psychology. She is passionate about sustainability, social justice, and nurturing the relationship between people and nature/animals. Other passions of Sally include music, anything outdoors, yoga, painting, and exploring spirituality.

Congratulations to the incoming 2021-2022 cohort and the graduated alumni! Learn more about this year’s full cohort here.

2021-2022 Chesapeake Conservation Corps Class Announced

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2021-2022 Chesapeake Conservation Corps Class Announced

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: Contact: Jana Davis, 410-974-2941 ext. 100, jdavis@cbtrust.org

(Annapolis, MD) August 17, 2021– Today the Chesapeake Bay Trust, funded by the Maryland Chesapeake vehicle license plate among other sources, introduced the newest class of its Chesapeake Conservation Corps members. This program was created by the late Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller, Jr., and others in the Maryland General Assembly to invest in the state’s young people, provide valuable job skills training, and promote the green economy in Maryland. The program matches young people ages 18-25 with non-profit and government organizations for one-year stipend-supported terms of service, focused on improving local communities and protecting natural resources. The Chesapeake Bay Trust administers the program.

“We need all hands on deck to protect the Chesapeake Bay and preserve this national treasure for generations to come. The Chesapeake Conservation Corps program, created by my good friend Senate President Mike Miller, is key to launching the next generation of Maryland leaders through environmental workforce development and creating pathways to good-paying green jobs. Today we celebrate this new class of young leaders ready to take action by working to protect our environment. This program is central to our efforts to maintain a healthy Bay and a strong Maryland economy, and I know the work of these leaders will help continue to carry out Mike’s legacy of environmental stewardship,” said Senator Van Hollen.

Since the program began in 2010 with an inaugural class of 16 members, the Corps has increased in size due to its popularity among young people pursing environmental interests and the organizations that host Corps members each year. The Corps has become a premier launching pad for green careers and a reliable resource for environmentally focused organizations who are recruiting the next generation of environmental professionals. Close to 300 alums have become both leaders in the environmental movement as well as, just as importantly, engaged individuals bringing a stewardship ethic to non-environmental careers. Many of them are hired by their host organizations following their years of service.

“The Chesapeake Conservation Corps program is such a fantastic way for young people to start their careers,” said Senator Sarah Elfreth, who has been appointed by the Maryland Senate President to serve on the Corps Advisory Board. “We in the General Assembly cannot wait to see what these Corps members accomplish this year and beyond.”

Today, 33 Corps members met virtually their 31 host organizations to learn more about their job responsibilities for the upcoming year. During their year of service, Corps members will gain valuable on-the-job experience as they work to advance environmental conservation, K-12 education, energy efficiency programs, sustainable agriculture practices, and a host of other environmentally focused initiatives.

Funds for the program are provided by the Chesapeake Bay Trust, the Maryland Department of Natural Resources, the U.S. National Park Service, and Baltimore Gas and Electric (BGE), among others.

“BGE is very proud to support the Chesapeake Conservation Corps Program. Not only does the program prepare our youth with heightened awareness and skills to conserve our natural resources and protect the environment, but it develops our local workforce in a meaningful and unique way. At BGE, we believe that cultivating a talented, diverse workforce that can serve the state’s needs is critical, and this program has successfully prepared hundreds of new members of our workforce over its 12-year history” said Alex Núñez, senior vice president of BGE’s Strategy and Regulatory Affairs and Chesapeake Bay Trust Trustee.

During the year, Corps participants work directly with their host organizations while also receiving extensive job trainings hosted by the Trust as well as other service-learning opportunities including grant writing and project management.

“One aspect I love about this program is that not only does it create life-changing experiences for the Corps members, but it can really help the host organizations’ abilities to accomplish their missions,” said Dr. Jana Davis, executive director of the Chesapeake Bay Trust. “We have a wide range of not-for-profits who benefit, from small to large, and those with primarily environmental missions as well as those without.”

Of the 33 selected participants, 12 will work in Anne Arundel County, 6 in Baltimore City, 5 in Prince George’s County, 5 in Howard County, 2 in Calvert County; and 1 each in Montgomery County, Worcester County, and Pennsylvania.

About the Chesapeake Bay Trust
The Chesapeake Bay Trust (www.cbtrust.org) is a nonprofit grant-making organization established by the Maryland General Assembly dedicated to improving the natural resources of the Chesapeake region through environmental education, community engagement, and local watershed restoration. The Trust’s grantees engage hundreds of thousands of individuals annually in projects that have a measurable impact on the waterways and other natural resources of the region. The Trust is supported by the sale of the Maryland Treasure the Chesapeake license plate; donations to the Chesapeake Bay and Endangered Species Fund on the Maryland State income tax form; donations made by hunters, fishers, and boaters in the Maryland online natural resource licensing system; donations from individuals and corporations; and partnerships with private foundations and federal, state, and local governments that enable grant-making watershed-wide. The Trust has received the highest rating from Charity Navigator for over two decades: On average, 90% of the Trust’s expenditures are directed to its restoration and education programs.

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Chesapeake Conservation Corps 2021-2022 Corps Member Placements

Allyson Bartell, Maryland Department of Natural Resources: Resource Assessment Service

Annapolis, Anne Arundel County

Allyson “Ally” will serve her year at Maryland Department of Natural Resources, where she will assist in measuring stream and storm flow and conducting geomorphological surveys, as well as water quality data collection and analysis. She will also compile stream restoration monitoring data and interpret results which will be shared with many audiences. Ally is a recent graduate from Johns Hopkins University where she earned a B.S. in Environmental Science. Ally’s favorite classes included sustainable food systems, Inca art history, and environmental anthropology; in her free time, you can find her hiking, gardening, and reading.

Jack Beckham, Severn River Association

Annapolis, Anne Arundel County

Jack is coming from Boston College to join the Corps. He recently graduated with a degree in Environmental Studies and a minor in Hispanic Studies. Jack previously interned at Resources Environmental Services and is a big runner and outdoors enthusiast. During his Corps year Jack will assist with weekly water quality monitoring, and an on-the-water Floating Classroom educational program. Jack will also coordinate volunteers on a variety of monitoring activities, develop watershed assessments of the Severn River and obtain a Maryland Boating License.

Clara Brill-Carlat, American Chestnut Land Trust

Prince Frederick, Calvert County

During her placement at American Chestnut Land Trust Clara will focus on science and restoration. She will work with and lead volunteer groups in various land management activities including invasive species removal, meadow establishment, hiking trail maintenance, property monitoring, and forest and wildlife diversity surveys. Clara recently graduated from Smith College with a degree in geology. She is a native Baltimorean and is excited to contribute to the conservation of Maryland’s natural resources. In her free time, she likes to go on long walks and write limericks.

Kathryn Burcham, Prince George’s County Public Schools, William S. Schmidt Outdoor Education Center

Brandywine, Prince George’s County

Kathryn will serve her year at The Schmidt Center leading students and teachers to implement environmental lessons, conduct field restoration projects, practice animal care, facilitate team building, and assist with professional development opportunities for teachers. Prior to joining the Corps, Kathryn graduated from St. Mary’s College of Maryland with a bachelor’s degree in Biology. Kathryn is looking forward to building meaningful connections and gaining new experiences through the Corps.

Lucy Burnam, The Community Ecology Institute

Columbia, Howard County

Lucy recently graduated from the University of Mississippi with a degree in Journalism and a focus on photography, videography, and marketing. Lucy spent the summer in Hawaii on a sustainable coffee farm learning about their process, and how to harvest pineapples, mangos, cacao, and ice cream beans. During her Corps year Lucy will assist at the Institute’s new urban organic farm tending the farm and gardens using regenerative agriculture principles and will be coordinating among the local community organizations.

Selina Cheng, Maryland Department of Natural Resources: Resource Assessment Service

Annapolis, Anne Arundel County

During her year in the Corps Selina will support the Maryland Department of Natural Resources’ freshwater mussel restoration project by conducting field surveys, producing and culturing mussels in a hatchery, collecting data, conducting feasibility studies, and developing new outreach material to highlight conservation efforts. Selina will be moving back east from Alaska to join the Corps; in Alaska, she assisted with long-term monitoring of Arctic lakes. Selina attended the University of Virginia where she recently received a dual degree in Environmental Science and English.

Joshua Cohen, Interfaith Partners for the Chesapeake

Annapolis, Anne Arundel County

Joshua is a recent graduate from Washington College where he earned a degree in Environmental Science and minored in Chesapeake Regional Studies and Music. He has spent time this year working in Arizona at a nature center, with Habitat for Humanity in North Carolina, and at outdoor conference centers in Kansas, on top of helping with the vaccination effort in Albany. This year he will lead online and in-person educational events and coordinate volunteer involvement in restoration projects for Interfaith Partners for the Chesapeake (IPC). Joshua will also help coordinate IPC’s One Water Partnership.

Virginia Davis, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Patuxent Research Refuge

Laurel, Anne Arundel County

Virginia “Genny” grew up in Richmond, Virginia and attended school at Warren Wilson College where she majored in Environmental Studies and minored in Environmental Policy. Genny says that growing up in the Chesapeake Bay watershed has shaped her love of the outdoors and that she is excited to begin to explore Maryland. While at the Patuxent Research Refuge Genny will work on partnership development and environmental education in the urban corridor between Baltimore and Washington, DC. She will also work to foster meaningful adoption by the Refuge of best practices for urban engagement under four Critical Engagement Elements in the Urban Wildlife Conservation Program Strategic Plan (Community-focused, Intentional, Inclusive, Collaborative).

Laura Exar, Anne Arundel County Department of Recreation and Parks, Jug Bay Wetlands Sanctuary

Lothian, Anne Arundel County

Laura will work with Jug Bay in creating a sensory garden, supporting invasive species control efforts, designing and conducting a community science herpetological survey, and promoting outdoor environmental education through classrooms in the field. Laura recently graduated from the University of Maryland, College Park where she studied Environmental Science and Policy with a concentration in Marine and Coastal Management and a minor in Sustainability Studies. She hopes to go on to pursue a Master’s in marine and estuarine science. Prior to the Corps, she worked at the National Aquarium in Baltimore.

Avery Farrell, Howard County Office of Community Sustainability

Ellicott City, Howard County

Avery “Ave”, who majored in Geography and Environmental Science at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County, hopes to gain knowledge about climate change mitigation during her time in the Corps. She likes to walk/hike, crochet, create YouTube videos and in the spring and summer watch thunderstorms. While at Howard County’s Office of Community Sustainability for her year with the Corps, Ave will work to engage county employees, businesses, and residents in saving energy, reducing litter, and combatting climate change.

Christy Ferguson, The Community Ecology Institute

Columbia, Howard County

Christy graduated from the University of Maryland, Baltimore County with a major in Environmental Science and Geography. Christy spent the summer learning about environmental education programs, restoration monitoring, wildlife surveys, and water quality monitoring with the Maryland Coastal Bays Program. This year Christy will support the Institute’s educational programming at the intersections of environment, health, and equity and will coordinate garden installations at several community locations.

Quinae West, Towson University (Center for STEM Excellence)

Baltimore City

Quinae was recently married and is a proud mom. She is currently working on her associate degree from Harford Community College. She has a passion for environmental science and has particular interest in learning about habitat restoration, sustainability, and marine conservation. During her time with Towson University’s Center for STEM Excellence, Quinae will develop activities and facilitate programs designed to foster a sense of stewardship of the Chesapeake Bay in Maryland’s K-12 students.

Jacob Honn, National Aquarium

Baltimore City

During the course of Jacob’s year, he will assist with the Aquarium’s activities and programs designed to stop plastic pollution, combat climate change, save wildlife, and restore habitats. Jacob graduated from Earlham College in Indiana with a degree in biology and even spent a semester abroad in New Zealand. He spent the last year managing Maryland Environmental Trust’s volunteer easement monitoring program. He has recently gotten into mycology, birding, and gardening and spends a lot of time outdoors.

Mary Hoover, American Chestnut Land Trust

Prince Frederick, Calvert County

Mary will assist with the American Chestnut Land Trust’s one-acre sustainable agriculture farm as farm manager and will support farm-related community outreach. She will also participate in the Maryland Master Naturalist program. Mary was born and raised in Omaha Nebraska and will be joining the Corps following a summer working on an organic strawberry farm in Vermont. She is a recent graduate from Creighton University where she earned a degree in Environmental Science and minored in Sustainability Studies and Spanish. In her free time, Mary likes hiking, thrifting, playing soccer and tennis, and hanging out with her cat.

Kathryn Kavanagh, Maryland Coastal Bays Program

Berlin, Worcester County

Kathryn “Katie” will work with the science and restoration staff on water quality monitoring, oyster gardening, wetland monitoring, anadromous fish sampling, and restoration project construction. She will also work in education designing and leading meaningful educational programs, field excursions, and activities in and around the watershed. Katie graduated from Lafayette College in PA with a dual degree in Environmental Science and International Affairs. She loves working with kids and has a background in environmental education. Mary is working at Schuylkill Center in Philadelphia this summer.

Spencer Kessinger, Robinson Nature Center

Columbia, Howard County

Spencer will serve her year at Robinson Nature Center where she will learn to teach educational programs to people of all ages, take care of a live animal collection, and learn about all the behind the scenes work that makes a large nature center run smoothly. Spencer is a recent graduate from St. Mary’s College of Maryland with a degree in Environmental Studies and minors in Biology and Education. Spencer likes walking/hiking, snuggling with her dogs, kayaking, and learning about pollinators.

James Looper, U.S. National Park Service Fort McHenry National Monument and Historic Shrine

Baltimore City

At the National Park Service James “Jimmy” will be researching Chesapeake Bay climate change data, creating and implementing an interpretative program related to climate change, analyzing Trail GIS data and creating maps; and participating in outreach events. Jimmy graduated from Washington College with a double major in Environmental Studies and Anthropology and has formerly worked at the National Aquarium in Baltimore and with NOAA in the Pacific Northwest.

Amelia Lowe, Chesapeake Conservancy

Annapolis, Anne Arundel County

During her year of service Amelia will be a key member of the Chesapeake Conservation Partnership dedicated to meeting the Bay Program’s land conservation goals and new goals to conserve 30% of lands in the watershed by 2030. She will learn and contribute to many cutting-edge policies and programs. Amelia is a recent graduate from the College of William and Mary where she double majored in Environmental Science & Policy and History. Her career interests include sustainable urban development, science communication, and corporate sustainability. On Sunday mornings you can find her at the Dupont Circle Farmer’s Market.

Lorenzo Mack-Johnson, Waterfront Partnership of Baltimore

Baltimore City

During Lorenzo’s year in the Corps he will learn about local clean water issues, engage diverse public audiences, and conduct field work at the waterfront and in East Baltimore neighborhoods through the Waterfront Partnership’s Healthy Harbors Initiative. Lorenzo is completing his bachelor’s degree in Environmental Sustainability from the University of Baltimore. He is working to become a Maryland Master Naturalist and is excited about the community engagement and oyster restoration work he will be involved in.

Declan Murphy, Howard County Conservancy

Woodstock, Howard County

Declan will plan and execute environmental program activities for K-12 school programs, a summer nature camp, and the Conservancy’s brand-new nature preschool. Additionally, he will oversee daily care and educational presentations of nature center animals including the barred owl, eastern black rat snake, terrapin, chickens, and goats. Declan recently graduated from Swarthmore College with a degree in Environmental Studies and Biology. This summer, Declan is collecting data on Philadelphia’s new plastic bag ban.

Julissa Murrieta, The Nature Conservancy

Bethesda, Montgomery County
Julie graduated from the University of Maryland, College Park with a degree in Biological Sciences with a concentration in Ecology and Evolution and a minor in Sustainability Studies. In her free time, she enjoys hiking, reading, embroidery, puzzling, and snuggling with her cat. For her year with the Corps, Julissa’s work will range from researching forest health and resilience in the Central Appalachians to blue carbon and coastal resiliency on the Eastern Shore. She will even learn how to execute controlled burning.

Christopher Orozco-Fletcher, U.S. National Park Service Chesapeake Bay

Annapolis, Anne Arundel County

During his placement with the National Park Service, Christopher will staff the “Chesapeake Roving Ranger” mobile interpretive vehicle and will develop and conduct interpretive outreach and educational programming to promote the understanding and stewardship of the cultural, natural, recreational, and historic resources of the Chesapeake Bay watershed. Christopher is a recent college graduate from Earlham College in Indiana where he studied Environmental Sustainability with a focus in Resource Conservation. Christopher is a proud Eagle Scout and enjoys contra dancing, drawing, hiking, ultimate frisbee, biking, and traveling.

Pamela Pina, Maryland Environmental Service

Millersville, Anne Arundel County

During her year of service Pamela will work with the Geospatial and Engineering Service’s division at Maryland Environmental Service and learn how GIS can be utilized in a multitude of situations for planning, implementing, and evaluating stormwater projects throughout the State. Pamela is a graduate from the University of Maryland, Baltimore County with a degree in Environmental Science and Geography. She has previously done work with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and enjoys walking and playing with her puppy in her free time.

Andrew Rapp, U.S. Geological Survey: Patuxent Wildlife Research Center

Laurel, Prince George’s County

Andrew will serve his year with the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center and will focus on monitoring a variety of avian species on Poplar Island and as well as method development (unmanned aircraft systems and thermal imaging). Andrew recently graduated from the College of William and Mary with a double major in Biology and Environmental Science & Policy. Andrew spent his summer as a first mate on a fishing boat off the coast of Cape Hatteras, North Carolina to learn about seabirds, marine mammals, and fisheries.

Jack Ruszkowski, Accokeek Foundation

Accokeek, Prince George’s County

During his year Jack will work as the Pasture Restoration Specialist with the Accokeek Foundation. Jack will spend time sampling and identifying native and invasive plant species within livestock pastures, mapping plant species sampled using ArcGIS, and developing and implementing an integrated livestock plan for invasive species management and pasture restoration. Jack is a recent graduate from the College of William and Mary with a degree in Anthropology. He has an interest in agriculture and forestry projects, particularly those relating to soil health and sustainable agriculture.

Bethany Sims, Town of Edmonston

Edmonston, Prince George’s County

Bethany will spend her year with the Town of Edmonston where she will focus on community engagement and education programs for the residents of Edmonston. She will also be involved with development of environmental policy for the Town and will work with the urban forestry and energy programs. Bethany has a bachelor’s degree in Environmental Studies and a minor in Political Studies from Towson University. She is driven by the need to protect vulnerable animals and preserve their habitat. In her free time, Bethany loves painting and drawing scenes.

Caroline Spiccioli, Maryland Department of the Environment

Baltimore City

During her year in the Corps Caroline will work with the Maryland Department of the Environment non-point source watershed planning program to develop or update watershed plans that meet EPA requirements. Caroline has a bachelor’s degree in Environmental Studies from The University of Vermont in Burlington Vermont. Caroline is interested in climate resilience and hopes to influence the way urban communities’ function to incorporate climate and environmental justice policies.

Samina Soin-Voshell, Maryland Department of Natural Resources: Chesapeake Bay Natural Estuarine Research Reserve

Annapolis, Anne Arundel County

Working with the Chesapeake Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve this year, Samina will build estuarine and environmental literacy through programs with teachers, students, and communities that will connect them to the Bay and move them to take action toward its protection and restoration. Samina graduated from Washington College with a dual degree in Environmental Science and Biology with a minor in Chesapeake Regional Studies.

Shannon Thomas, Chesapeake Conservancy

Selinsgrove, Pennsylvania

Shannon will work with the Chesapeake Conservancy at Susquehanna University during her year with the Corps, where she will grow a new program using the latest innovations in riparian forest buffer science to improve creeks and streams. She will also train students and partners to use geospatial data to identify where restoration will make the biggest water quality impacts. Shannon recently graduated from Washington College with a degree in Environmental Science and minors in Chesapeake Bay Regional Studies and Chemistry.

Devin Valcich, U.S. National Park Service Chesapeake Bay

Annapolis, Anne Arundel County

Devin earned her bachelor’s degree from Washington College in Environmental Studies and a minor in Chesapeake Regional Studies. She was able to study abroad during college in Ireland, Belize, and Guatemala. Throughout the next year Devin will staff the “Chesapeake Roving Ranger” mobile interpretive vehicle and will develop and conduct interpretive outreach and educational programming to promote the understanding and stewardship of the cultural, natural, recreational, and historic resources of the Chesapeake Bay watershed.

Sally Watanabe, ECO City Farms

Riverdale, Prince George’s County

Sally will spend her year in the Corps with ECO City Farms. She will cultivate sustainably grown food year-round; turn local food waste into rich compost; educate local youth and families about food, health, and the environment; engage in hands-on trainings and permaculture projects on the farm; and be involved in outreach and community organizing for urban farming/environmental restoration. Sally recently graduated from the University of Richmond with a degree in Psychology. She is passionate about sustainability, social justice, and nurturing the relationship between people and nature/animals. Other passions of Sally include music, anything outdoors, yoga, painting, and exploring spirituality.

Lexi Watson, Maryland Department of the Environment

Baltimore City

Lexi recently graduated from Old Dominion University in Norfolk Virginia with a degree in Marine Biology and a minor in Conservation Leadership. Over the summer, Lexi is working with the Kiawah Conservancy in South Carolina. In her free time, she likes hiking/ camping, surfing/ paddle boarding, snorkeling, reading, and dancing. This year with the Maryland Department of the Environment, Lexi will build off a previous Corps Member’s data collection and analysis of living shorelines by compiling the data into a GIS format that can be linked to a GIS data layer (for mapping). She will also expand data collection and analysis of living shoreline projects that impacted submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV) and evaluate the long-term impacts on SAV. Finally, Lexi will evaluate the impacts of home values related to living shoreline vs. hardened shoreline installation.

Rylee Wernoch, Smithsonian Environmental Research Center

Edgewater, Anne Arundel County

During her year at The Smithsonian Environmental Research Center (SERC), Rylee will work to understand the interests of local stakeholder and community organizations and identify areas of overlap between those needs and SERC’s scientific expertise. Rylee will work with SERC researchers and public engagement staff to plan and develop community-scientist partnerships and will gain experience with public engagement in science, science communication, and project development. Rylee recently graduated from Hobart and William Smith Colleges with degrees in Biology and Environmental Studies and a minor in Africana Studies. Rylee is interested in scientific communication, environmental justice and marine conservation and is spending the summer as a head instructor of a junior sailing program.

Maryland’s Underserved Urban Communities are About to Receive Much Needed Support for Greening

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Chesapeake Bay Trust LogoFor Immediate Release: June 7, 2021 

Contact: Cynamon Butler, Marketing and Communications Manager at Chesapeake Bay Trust,

(410) 974-2941 ext. 114, cbutler@cbtrust.org.

 

Maryland’s Underserved Urban Communities are About to Receive Much Needed Support for Greening

Annapolis, Maryland – Trees in all communities, but particularly urban communities, have significant benefits to health, climate, the economy, and the environment, yet some of Maryland’s urban communities are lagging on tree canopy goals.  Maryland’s General Assembly passed the Tree Solutions Now Act of 2021 to attempt to remedy this inequity, calling for 5 million trees to be planted over an eight-year period, with 500,000 of them targeted to urban, underserved areas.   The Chesapeake Bay Trust (the Trust) was identified as the administrator of the urban tree component, building on its 35-year history of distributing urban greening resources to communities across Maryland and the Chesapeake Bay watershed.  Ten million dollars per year over 8 years will be distributed by the Trust to communities, neighborhoods, civic groups, schools, and others who commit to planting trees in underserved regions as defined in the legislation.  This includes urban areas with low median household income levels, high unemployment, and neighborhoods with housing projects or that were historically red-lined.

Original bills including the urban tree program were sponsored by Senator Paul Pinsky in the Senate and Delegates Dana Stein and Tony Bridges in the House, with the final vehicle for the program, a bill sponsored by Delegate Jim Gilchrist and supported by Senator Sarah Elfreth.

“Greening our urban communities and, particularly, long under-served communities is imperative for both their health and, more broadly, the environment.  It is long overdue,” said Senator Pinsky.

“Trees and forests are one of the best solutions we have to the climate crisis.  They sequester lots of carbon dioxide, reduce the heat island effect, and provide many other environmental co-benefits,” added Delegate Dana Stein.

Studies show that urban communities with greater tree cover offer residents lower crime rates, better air quality, better physical and mental human health, and reduced energy costs; offer commercial districts economic advantages; and offer the environment carbon storage to combat climate change and water uptake to filter stormwater.

“This is an exciting time for Maryland as communities who have historically been negatively impacted by less than favorable environmental conditions will be at the forefront of positive environmental change,” said Delegate Bridges.

“This program will lift up so many of Maryland’s communities.  I am happy Maryland is embarking on this adventure,” added Delegate Gilchrist.

“We have a duty to protect the environment for future generations,” according to Delegate David Fraser-Hidalgo.  “Protecting the environment in Maryland’s urban communities through the Urban Tree program will help clean our air, manage our storm water, and inspire positive change for generations to come.”

Many sectors and constituents worked together with members of the General Assembly to bring the 5 million tree goal to fruition, including the hard work of climate, environmental, and community groups.

“We need to make sure that everyone has access to the health benefits of green spaces, especially our urban communities,” said Senator Arthur Ellis.

“It is time for environmental concerns in urban communities to be prioritized,” added Delegate Darryl Barnes, Chair of the Legislative Black Caucus of Maryland.  “I am glad the Urban Tree Program is ensuring that our urban communities will see the benefits of improved water quality and reduced pollution.

“Underserved—and under-treed—urban communities exist in many areas of our State,” said Senator Elfreth. “I am honored to have joined in the many groups across our region who supported this effort to bring trees to so many neighborhoods.”

“Trees are great natural filters of our air and water,” said Chesapeake Bay Foundation Maryland Executive Director Josh Kurtz. “Adding more of them to our cities and towns will help reduce stormwater, urban heat islands, and provide habitat to wildlife. We were pleased when the bill passed and are even more excited to get these trees planted. These 500,000 trees will help clean the Chesapeake Bay and beautify our urban communities.”

Administering funding for tree planting initiatives is not new to the Trust.  Many are most familiar with the Treasure the Chesapeake vehicle license plate, which supplies many of the funds the Trust administers through community-based grant-making for tree planting initiatives.  The Trust additionally administers funds for others who want to engage local not-for-profit groups in greening activities, such as municipalities (e.g., the cities of Salisbury and Gaithersburg), counties (e.g., Baltimore City, Anne Arundel, Montgomery, Prince George’s, Howard, Harford, and more), state and federal agencies, and corporate and private foundations.  With all the Trust’s partners, the Trust has administered close to 300 tree planting grants in the past five years, 30% of them in urban areas, planting over 140,000 trees (20,000 in urban areas) and engaging over 60,000 community members.

“It is an honor that the Trust was named to administer the funds for the program and we are thankful to everybody who helped to make the Urban Trees Program a reality.” said Jana Davis, executive director of the Chesapeake Bay Trust.

Grants through this new program will become available in the summer of 2022, with the time between now and then spent on listening to members of diverse groups from diverse backgrounds to structure the opportunity.  Developing relationships with the communities being impacted and their individuals, organizations, and businesses is imperative to support long-term sustainable tree-planting projects that are well-maintained and welcomed by communities.

 

About the Chesapeake Bay Trust

The Chesapeake Bay Trust (www.cbtrust.org) is a nonprofit grant-making organization established by the Maryland General Assembly dedicated to improving the natural resources of Maryland and the Chesapeake region through environmental education, community engagement, and local watershed restoration. The Trust’s grantees engage hundreds of thousands of individuals annually in projects that have a measurable impact on the waterways and other natural resources of the region. The Trust is supported by the sale of the Treasure the Chesapeake license plate; donations to the Chesapeake Bay and Endangered Species Fund on the Maryland State income tax form; donations made by hunters, fishers, and boaters in the Maryland online natural resource licensing system; donations from individuals and corporations; and partnerships with private foundations and federal, state, and local governments. The Trust has received the highest rating from Charity Navigator for over two decades: On average, 90% of the Trust’s expenditures are directed to its restoration and education programs.

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Celebrate Earth Day 2021!

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8 Steps You Can Take This Earth Day to Help Mother Nature

Are looking for things to do for Earth Day? Here are a few actions you can take and events you can attend to support the Earth.

1. Take a walk in your neighborhood and pick up trash. 

All it takes is a couple of pairs of gloves and a trash bag to get involved. Look out for sharp and dangerous objects and stay safe!

2. Pick up pet waste! Timely removal keeps waste from washing into waterways and spreading bacteria and parasites.

Why Scoop That Poop

Click the image to learn more about why picking up pet waste is so important!

3. Switch to online billing and go paperless for your household budget.

Imagine how many bills pile up on your desk each year. Switching to e-bills cannot only make your life more efficient but save trees in the process.

4. Make a personal plastic audit.

Check items around your house to fully understand how prevalent plastic is in your life and investigate ways to make simple swaps.

5. Switch out single-use plastic bags for reusable shopping totes.

It is estimated that every year, 300 million plastic bags are put in the Atlantic Ocean. If we all make the change, we can help prevent this pollution.

6. Replace inefficient incandescent light bulbs with efficient CFLs or LEDS. 

By switching to efficient light bulbs, you can reduce your carbon footprint by 450 pounds a year!

7. Contribute to the Chesapeake Bay Trust to help make a powerful investment in the Chesapeake region.

By donating to the Chesapeake Bay Trust, you are contributing to the funding of organizations that help make a powerful environmental impact on the Chesapeake region each year.

8. Attend these Earth Day Events.

 

The High 5 Initiative – Earth Day Kayak Cleanup:

Sat, April 24, 2021

8:30 AM – 12:00 PM

 

Baltimore City Composting Virtual Workshop:

Thurs, Apr. 22nd

10:30 am – 12:00 pm

 

 Baltimore’s First Annual Zero Waste Day:

Thurs, Apr. 22nd

6:30 – 8:30 pm

 

Maryland Stream Restoration Association – 2021 Virtual Career Seminar:

Thurs, Apr. 22nd

11:30 am – 1:00 pm

 

 

 

Check It to Protect It: Tax Time is for Conservation

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Chesapeake Bay Trust Logo    Maryland Department of Natural Resources

Check It to Protect It:

Tax Time is for Conservation

Donations made to the Chesapeake Bay and Endangered Species Fund through Maryland’s income tax check-off program support education, community stewardship, and Bay restoration efforts

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Contact: Cynamon Butler, cbutler@cbtrust.org, 410-974-2941 ext. 114 or 919-669-9531

(Annapolis, MD) February 17, 2021 – Tax season is here, and Marylanders can help protect one of our state’s greatest natural treasures, the Chesapeake Bay and its wildlife, by making a tax-deductible contribution to line 35, the Chesapeake Bay and Endangered Species Fund, on the Maryland tax form.

Where does the money go? The Chesapeake Bay and Endangered Species Fund was created to support Bay restoration and education programs and to protect Maryland’s rare, threatened, and endangered species. The fund is split evenly between the Chesapeake Bay Trust, a highly rated nonprofit organization, and the Wildlife and Heritage Division of the Maryland Department of Natural Resources. The line on the state income tax form allows Marylanders to quickly and easily donate to help the Bay and conserve Maryland’s native wildlife and endangered species. Nearly $1 million was contributed through the 2019 tax check-off, which funded Bay restoration initiatives, community stewardship projects, and environmental education programs across Maryland from the mountains to the ocean.
Now more than ever, it is important to protect – and visit – our natural resources. Many outdoor spaces, such as state parks, saw a significant increase in visitors during the COVID-19 pandemic when indoor venues like movie theaters and the mall were off limits.

“More and more people are beginning to understand what science has shown us for decades: People who spend time outdoors are healthier, which means they likely have fewer underlying conditions, which means they are poised to be able to withstand attacks like COVID-19 better,” said Jana Davis, executive director of the Chesapeake Bay Trust. “We need to make sure ALL of our residents have access to healthy, clean, green outdoor spaces and that we work to solve any disparities in this access, and contributions to this fund can help.”

Launched in 1990, the Chesapeake Bay and Endangered Species Fund is one of the most successful voluntary tax check-off programs in the nation. Last year, more than 30,000 Maryland state income tax statements were returned with contributions to the fund. To make your contribution, simply complete line 35 on your Maryland state income tax form or ask your certified public accountant or tax preparer. Donations of any dollar amount can be made and all are tax deductible. For more information on the Chesapeake Bay Trust, visit www.cbtrust.org/taxdonation, or for details on the Department of Natural Resource’s Wildlife and Heritage Division, visit www.dnr.maryland.gov/wildlife.

Additionally, Certified Public Accountants and tax preparers have joined in on restoration efforts to improve the health of the Bay and conserve our at-risk species through the CPAs for a Healthy Bay program led by the Chesapeake Bay Trust. If you would like to work with a Bay-friendly CPA this tax season, or if you are a CPA who would like to participate in this program, visit www.cbtrust.org/cpas to learn more.

About the Chesapeake Bay Trust
The Chesapeake Bay Trust (www.cbtrust.org) is a nonprofit grant-making organization established by the Maryland General Assembly dedicated to improving the natural resources of Maryland and the Chesapeake region through environmental education, community engagement, and local watershed restoration. The Trust’s grantees engage hundreds of thousands of individuals annually in projects that have a measurable impact on the waterways and other natural resources of the region. The Trust is supported by the sale of the Chesapeake Bay license plate, donations to the Chesapeake Bay and Endangered Species Fund on the Maryland State income tax form, donations from individuals and corporations, and partnerships with private foundations and federal, state, and local governments. The Trust has received the highest rating from Charity Navigator for sixteen years. On average, 90 percent of the Trust’s expenditures are directed to its restoration and education programs.

About the Wildlife and Heritage Division of the Maryland Department of Natural Resources
The Wildlife and Heritage Service regularly reviews its database to determine areas it considers priorities for acquisition to maintain the quality of the unusual ecosystems, natural communities, or habitats for rare species. These recommendations are used by Maryland Department of Natural Resources, The Nature Conservancy, and other conservation organizations interested in purchasing ecologically significant properties. The Department of Natural Resources receives dedicated funding, through a very small percentage of the real estate transfer tax, called the Heritage Conservation Fund to be used specifically for the purchase of important natural areas harboring habitats for rare species or unique natural communities.

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Chesapeake Bay Trust Awards – Fiscal Year 2021

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The Chesapeake Bay Trust (Trust) has awarded over $130 million through more than 14,000 awards to ensure cleaner, greener, healthier Chesapeake, Coastal Bays, and Youghiogheny watersheds since 1985. The Trust has a rigorous grant review process: every proposal submitted over $5,000 is sent to members of a Technical Review Committee (TRC) and is reviewed and scored quantitatively by at least three external individuals who are experts in their fields. The Board of Trustees meets 4 times per year to review and approve all TRC recommended proposals. Proposals for $5,000 or less are reviewed by two or more technical experts on the Chesapeake Bay Trust program team. The award list will be updated after each board meeting. Reach out to the designated program officer for more details.

September 2020

Anne Arundel County Forestry and Forested Land Protection

The goal of this program is to implement cost-effective reforestation and greening projects and increase the number of acres of protected forested land in the County. For information about this grant program click here.

Scenic Rivers Land Trust: for the protection of 27 acres of existing forest with a permanent conservation easement and the reforestation and protection of 1.5 acres on Bodkin Creek property in Pasadena, Maryland. $175,296.

Community Engagement and Restoration Mini Grants

This program is designed to engage Maryland residents in activities that enhance communities, engage residents, and improve natural resources by funding small-scale activities such as tree plantings, rain gardens, and community cleanups, among others. For information about this grant program click here.

Blue Water Baltimore: for the creation of a short video regarding green infrastructure and how residents can participate in reducing stormwater runoff in their communities. $5,000.

Christian Liberty Church: for a community clean-up event and installation of a mural connecting faith, clean water, and environmental stewardship. $5,000.

Gwynn Oak United Methodist Church: for the installation of a native plant garden, a native tree, and three rain barrels and a workshop regarding the importance of native plants and water harvesting for capturing and treating stormwater. $5,000.

Project Bright Future: for a series of workshops about community health and ways to reduce stormwater runoff and four community clean-up events. $4,985.

Saint Elizabeth School, Inc.: for the installation of two cisterns and pumps to control runoff from horticultural building and hands-on learning experiences. $3,807.

Saint Matthias Catholic Church: for a series of lectures on the importance of trees and their connection to watershed health and for a park clean-up and field trip to Jug Bay Wetlands Sanctuary with congregation members. $5,000.

Salem Evangelical Lutheran Church: for a native plant and shrub planting, community garden installation, and educational activities on the topics of natural resource and water quality challenges. $4,977.

Stillmeadow Community Fellowship: for the installation of four 150-gallon cisterns to capture stormwater runoff from the church roof and for educational workshops regarding stormwater impacts to local waterways and how communities can install and maintain individual, residential rain barrels. $4,999.

Tilghman on Chesapeake Community Association: for the installation of 21 native trees on a 2-acre non-tidal wetland site and educational activities regarding watershed health and water quality topics. $3,969.

Environmental Education Mini Grants

This program is designed to increase student awareness and involvement in the restoration and protection of our region’s natural resources by increasing access to programs that provide Meaningful Watershed Educational Experiences (MWEEs). For information about this grant program click here.

Alice Ferguson Foundation: for 25 third through eighth grade teachers in Prince George’s, Charles, and Allegany Counties to participate in a professional development training focused on Meaningful Watershed Educational Experiences. $5,000.

Bethesda Green: for 12 eleventh and twelfth grade students from Bethesda-Chevy Chase High School, Walt Whitman High School and Walter Johnson High School to participate in an Environmental Leadership Program. $5,000.

Dance Exchange: for 15 kindergarten through fifth grade teachers to participate in a professional development training focused on MWEEs and arts integration. $5,000.

Eastport Elementary PTA: for the installation of an outdoor classroom at Eastport Elementary School. $4,938.

Fenix Youth Project: for 25 students in Salisbury, Maryland to participate in an outdoor investigation and install a mural. $4,998.

Graceland Park O’Donnell Heights Elementary/ Middle School: for 240 fourth through eighth grade students to participate in a field experience and complete an action project in their community. $4,570.

Grasonville Elementary School: for 88 fourth grade students to research, design, and plant a rain garden on the school grounds. $4,462.

Howard County Conservancy, Inc.: for 9th graders from Howard County Public Schools to participate in the Watershed Report Card MWEE. $4,989.

Immaculate Conception School: for 108 fourth and fifth grade students to investigate local issues that impact the Jones Falls watershed and its tributaries through classroom research and field trips to local tributaries and to participate in an action project which reduces pollution entering the local watershed.  $5,000.

Lesley and Evelyn Holmes Foundation: for 5 students in nineth through twelfth grade to participate in a Meaningful Watershed Educational Experience. $1,162.

Maryland Association for Environmental and Outdoor Education (MAEOE): for 60 teachers to participate in a professional development training focused on outdoor classroom use. $5,000.

One Montgomery Green: for 40 high school students to participate in the Clean Headwaters Program. $5,000.

Ridge Elementary School: for 112 third through fifth grade students to participate in the installation of an outdoor classroom. $5,000.

Talbot County Public Schools: for 354 sixth grade students to participate in an investigation focused on water quality in the Chesapeake Bay watershed and to complete a planting at Pickering Creek. $5,000.

November 2020

Community Engagement and Restoration Mini Grants

This program is designed to engage Maryland residents in activities that enhance communities, engage residents, and improve natural resources by funding small-scale activities such as tree plantings, rain gardens, and community cleanups, among others. For information about this grant program click here.

Havre de Grace Green Team: for the expansion of the Todd Park Food Forest and for a workshop to build knowledge on environmentally sustainable food-growing practices. $4,967.

Quail Meadow community Association, Inc.: for the installation of native plantings along the edge of the Quail Meadow community pond in Carroll County, Maryland. $4,971.

Tanglewood Homeowners Association: for the replacement of four Bradford Pear trees with 12 native trees in the Tanglewood community of Columbia and the engagement of the community in the planting and knowledge building on the ecological importance of native plants. $4,682.

4STEPS Therapeutic Riding Program: for ten special needs, at-risk teenagers and young adults to participate in a horseback reptile surveying project that includes watershed and ecological health education. $5,000.

EPA Goal Implementation Team - Environmental Education

This funding opportunity arose out of the urgent need to provide financial assistance to nonprofit environmental education providers throughout the Chesapeake Bay watershed during the COVID-19 pandemic, as their operations pivoted from place-based environmental education to virtual platforms and physically distanced schoolyard programs. For information about this program click here.

Annapolis Maritime Museum & Park: to support the adaptations and implementation of the Box of Rain and School In Nature programs. $20,000.

Blue Sky Fund: to support the adaptations and implementation of the Explorers program for third, fourth, and fifth grade students at Richmond Public Schools. $20,000.

Boxerwood Education Association: to support the NEST program for students in Rockbridge County, VA. $19,990.

ECO City Farms: to support transitioning educational offerings to virtual and into at-home kits for 3,000 Prince George’s County students. $20,000.

Friends of Peirce Mill: for support of an online program for third graders in the District of Columbia including live lessons and a virtual field trip. $7,200.

Friends of the National Arboretum: to support distribution of Grow-at-Home kits for 2,000 students and 6 safely distanced Arboretum Family Days in the U.S. National Arboretum for high-needs school communities. $19,985.

Living Classrooms Foundation: to support the adaptations and implementation of a virtual SLURRP (School Leadership in Urban Runoff Reduction Project) program for fourth and fifth grade students in South Baltimore. $19,998.

Stroud Water Research Center: to support the adaptation and implementation of virtual Environmental Education programs, and the creation of a Pennsylvania Watershed Literacy and Resources website. $14,442.

Ward Foundation: to enable the Ward Museum to continue serving regional children and teachers via new socially distanced, virtual, and hybrid programs. $17,785.

Outreach and Restoration

This program encourages outreach and community engagement activities that increase stewardship ethic of natural resources and on-the-ground restoration activities that demonstrate restoration techniques and engage Maryland citizens in the restoration and protection of the Chesapeake Bay and its rivers. For information about this grant program click here.

Alliance for the Chesapeake Bay: for an 11-acre reforestation project in Harford County, Maryland. $49,958.

Alliance for the Chesapeake Bay: for the conversion of agricultural land into meadow at Serenity Farm and associated outreach efforts for the development and planning of future meadow projects in Charles County. $41,777.

Anacostia Riverkeeper: for outreach to Latinx faith-based organizations to raise awareness on the health risks of local fish consumption and other relationships between environmental and human health. $25,963.

Annapolis Maritime Museum & Park: for the creation and installation of educational signage for Chesapeake Bay watershed learning stations at Annapolis Maritime Museum’s two waterfront campuses and for an eight-part series of adult programs that connect adults with the history, health, and future of the watershed. $29,209.

Asbury Foundation: for the engagement of Asbury Methodist Village residents in tree plantings and workshops designed to increase understanding of watershed health. $30,000.

Audubon Naturalist Society of the Central Atlantic States, Inc.: for support of the Plant it Forward program to train community members and landscape professionals about conservation landscaping and benefits of native plants in Montgomery and Prince George’s Counties. $30,000.

Audubon Naturalist Society of the Central Atlantic States, Inc.: for 80 Montgomery county community members to participate in a bilingual Meaningful Watershed Educational Experience. $20,836.

Audubon Naturalist Society of the Central Atlantic States, Inc.: for experiences in nature for veterans through community environmental education programs along a wheelchair-accessible, streamside nature trail at 40-acre Woodend Nature Sanctuary. $10,126.

Baltimore City Department of Planning: for planting 32 trees in the Boyd-Booth community in Baltimore City, Maryland. $21,472.

Baltimore Green Space: for invasive species removal at Springfield Woods. $49,420.

Blue Water Baltimore: for planting 150 trees and associated outreach efforts in the Cherry Hill neighborhood in Baltimore, Maryland. $49,999.

Blue Water Baltimore: for a pilot campaign to educate Belair-Edison and Cherry Hill residents on the causes of sewage backups, the impacts to water quality, and the resources that exist to address the issue. $30,000.

Chesapeake Bay Foundation: for wetland restoration in Kent County, Maryland. $46,068.

Civic Works, Inc.: for a certification-based stormwater management training for 12 Baltimore City residents from historically excluded communities. $30,000.

The Community Ecology Institute: for the installation of best management practices and associated outreach efforts at Freetown Farm. $75,000.

Corner Team, Inc.: for the installation and maintenance of a pollinator garden with assistance from residents and members of Corner Team Boxing & Fitness Center. $5,757.

Defensores de la Cuenca: for outreach and engagement efforts to promote environmental stewardship within the Latinx community in Charles County. $21,391.

Ducks Unlimited, Inc.: for targeted outreach and education of agricultural landowners and producers on Maryland’s eastern shore. $29,691.

Friends of the Patapsco Valley Heritage Greenway, Inc.: for outreach and engagement efforts to promote environmental stewardship within the Latinx and Korean communities in Ellicott City, Maryland. $25,000.

Friends of the Patapsco Valley State Park Ltd: for support for Spanish speaking staff to lead Spanish educational programming for Latinx visitors focused on watershed and natural resource topics. $16,000.

Gunpowder Riverkeeper: for support for the Clear Choices Clean Water Harford program. $15,000.

Howard County Conservancy, Inc.: for the planting of a soft edge habitat with native trees and shrubs to support greater wildlife diversity and further protect the watershed along the border of the Howard County Conservancy and the historic Mt. Pleasant Farmstead in Woodstock, Maryland. $25,130.

Howard EcoWorks: for the engagement of individual property owners and communities in restoration projects to enhance ecosystem services and strengthen the resiliency of the communities. $22,000.

Interfaith Partners for the Chesapeake (IPC): for the training of individuals to develop green teams and produce an Action Plan for faith-based organizations located in Baltimore City, Maryland. $13,124.

Interfaith Partners for the Chesapeake (IPC): for the development of green teams at faith-based organizations in Gaithersburg, Maryland. $12,973.

Interfaith Partners for the Chesapeake (IPC): for the continued support of the Interfaith Green Leaders Training in Howard County. $12,000.

Interfaith Partners for the Chesapeake (IPC): for continued Green Team Leader support of Harford County faith-based communities. $11,673.

Interfaith Partners for the Chesapeake (IPC): for support of the Green Team Leadership Development Program to educate residents about watershed restoration and train congregation members with the goal of developing green teams in the City of Salisbury. $6,892.

Izaak Walton League of America (The): for support of the Winter Salt Watch program in Gaithersburg, Maryland. $30,923.

McDaniel College: for a forest and wetland restoration and the installation of a student-focused educational signage project at McDaniel College in Westminster, Maryland. $35,000.

Mid-shore Community Foundation: for members of three disenfranchised communities in the Choptank watershed to participate in community meetings and site visits to identify natural resource concerns and develop community restoration plans to address issues. $16,126.

The Nature Conservancy: for field days and coaching sessions with Harford County farmers to identify and implement practices to improve their operations with advanced nutrient management and precision agriculture technologies. $29,953.

NeighborSpace of Baltimore County, Inc.: for impervious surface removal, native plantings, and rain garden installation at Flannery Lane Park in Towson, Maryland. $35,000.

Oyster Recovery Partnership, Inc.: for the Marylanders Grow Oysters program through the Oyster Recovery Partnership and its community-based partners to recruit waterfront communities and homeowners near Maryland tributaries to donate their time, effort, and dock to care for cages of juvenile oysters until they mature. $49,999.

Patterson Park Audubon Center: for the growth of the Baltimore Bird Ambassador project to reach 400 Latinx community members. $29,700.

Pearlstone Conference & Retreat Center: for a bioretention and water stewardship outreach project at the Pearlstone Conference & Retreat Center in Reisterstown, Maryland. $30,602.

Pickering Creek Audubon Center: for a residential native plant outreach and awareness project in Talbot and Dorchester Counties. $29,726.

Potomac Conservancy: for support of the Volunteer Leadership Team to recruit and train volunteer leaders to organize and lead native seed collection events in neighborhoods and public lands in Montgomery and Frederick Counties. $29,262.

ReBUILD Metro, Inc.: for the creation of the East Preston Pocket Park and to train 30 local green team leaders and volunteers in greenspace stewardship and maintenance techniques $36,775.

St. Peter’s Episcopal Church: for the removal of impervious surface and replacement with permeable pavement, installation of native plantings, and associated outreach efforts at St. Peter’s Episcopal Church. $64,358.

ShoreRivers: for establishing a partnership with the Maryland Department of Natural Resources, Anne Arundel Community College, and Washington College to restore 24 acres of submerged aquatic vegetation and to provide new hands-on volunteer opportunities to improve water quality and clarity, increase of aquatic habitat, and to help meet the Chesapeake Bay Agreement habitat restoration goal. $63,446.

ShoreRivers: for the engagement of two Eastern Shore communities in the implementation of conservation planting projects, two River-Friendly Yards workshops, and one bus tour. $31,859.

Susquehannock Wildlife Society, Inc.: for an outreach program and the development and installation of interpretive signage focused on demonstration projects and how residents can create similar elements such as pollinator meadows, rain gardens, vernal pool, and stream restoration. $5,000.

University of Maryland, College Park: for the collection and testing of harvested rainwater and an educational program for urban growers and residents focused on water quality and water conservation topics. $29,985.

University of Maryland: Environmental Finance Center: for support of the Stormwater Management Residential Action Framework and Outreach 2.0 Campaign. $29,999.

Sponsorship

This program aims to support events that will increase awareness or knowledge on issues pertaining to restoration and protection of the Chesapeake Bay region natural resources and/or promote the Trust’s major sources of revenue. For information about this program click here.

Audubon Naturalist Society of the Central Atlantic States, Inc.: for support of the third Naturally Latinos and fourth Taking Nature Black virtual conferences. $2,500.

Harford Land Trust, Inc.: for an awareness campaign to increase support for farmland preservation and to strengthen the local food supply chain in Harford County. This effort will also create a video featuring farmers and the importance of protecting the environment. $1,000.

Maryland Association of Floodplain and Stormwater Managers: for support of the 2020 Maryland Association of Floodplain and Stormwater Managers virtual conference. $1,000.

Watershed Assistance Grant Program

The Chesapeake Bay Trust, the Maryland Department of Natural Resources, and the Maryland Department of the Environment welcome requests from local governments and non-profit organizations for assistance with the earliest phases of watershed restoration projects. This program will support watershed restoration project design assistance, watershed planning, and programmatic development associated with protection and restoration programs and projects that lead to improved water quality in the Maryland portion of the Chesapeake Bay watershed, the Maryland portion of the Youghiogheny watershed, and the Maryland Coastal Bays. For information about this program click here.

Arundel Rivers Federation: for design of stormwater management practices at St. Mark United Methodist Church., $16,521.00.

Center for Watershed Protection, Inc.: for design of the FC Frederick stream restoration project., $173,926.00.

Central Baltimore Partnership: for design of the Union Craft wetland project., $48,127.00.

Chesapeake Rivers Association, Inc.: for design of the Lindamoor outfall and living shoreline restoration project., $74,837.00.

Churchville Presbyterian Congregation: for the design of two stormwater management practices., $13,400.00.

County Commissioners of Caroline County: for design of rain gardens and conservation plantings at the Jonestown Community Park., $2,850.00.

John Carroll School: for development of a campus greening plan and design of stormwater management practices., $92,840.00.

Maryland Coastal Bays Program: for development of a watershed action plan for the Newport, Sinepuxent, and Chincoteague Bays sub-watersheds., $73,070.00.

ShoreRivers: for development of the Poor House Run assessment and plan., $52,956.00.

ShoreRivers: for design and permitting of the Sears Farm stream restoration project., $81,896.00.

ShoreRivers: for development of the Bayside Creeks watershed management plan., $49,903.00.

ShoreRivers: for the development of dairy conservation action plans for five Maryland Eastern Shore dairy operations., $52,238.00.ShoreRivers: for the design and permitting of the Turners Creek stream restoration project., $110,000.00.

ShoreRivers: for design of bioswale facilities at the Community Park in Galena., $17,996.00.

Spa Creek Conservancy (SCC): for engagement of residents at the Housing Authority of City of Annapolis (HACA) to develop a community plan for Hawkins Cove., $60,000.00.

The Low Impact Development Center, Inc.: for development of a stormwater master plan for the Town of Cheverly, Maryland., $50,000.00.

Town of Emmitsburg: for design and permitting of the Silo Hill detention basin restoration project., $34,000.00.

Towson Presbyterian Church: for design of two rain gardens and a cistern system at the Church., $35,509.00.

Trout Unlimited Inc.: for design of the Sand Spring Run stream restoration project., $114,411.00.

University of Maryland College Park: for design of the Campus Creek restoration and Pond Retrofit projects., $180,000.00.

February 2021

Capacity Building Initiative Grant Program

The Capacity Building Initiative (CBI) is a joint initiative from the Chesapeake Bay Trust and Chesapeake Bay Funders Network. CBI seeks to build the organizational capacity of natural resource focused nonprofit organizations working in the Chesapeake, Coastal Bays, and Youghiogheny watersheds. This program funds key capacity building strategies vital to establishing a strong base, including (but not limited to) the development of robust financial plans to modify or diversify organizational revenue sources and collaboration among organizations. For information about this grant program click here.

Alliance for the Chesapeake Bay: for contractual support to develop a fundraising plan that will diversify revenue sources. $30,000.

Alliance for the Shenandoah Valley: for diversity, equity, inclusion, and justice training and capacity building. $29,950.

Anacostia Watershed Society: for contractual services to support assessment and development of an organizational diversity, equity, inclusion, and justice plan. $30,000.

Anne Arundel Watershed Stewards Academy: for contractual services for a diversity, equity, inclusion, and justice assessment and plan. $30,000.

Capital Region Land Conservancy: for contractual assessment, training, and planning to build diversity, equity, inclusion, and justice capacity. $30,000.

Chesapeake Conservation Landscaping Council: for the development of a new strategic plan and adaptation of the certificate course. $10,681.

Citizens For Pennsylvania’s Future: for a diversity, equity, inclusion, and justice plan. $29,732.

Conservation Foundation of Lancaster County: for collaborative capacity building and survey work. $26,250.

EcoLatinos, Inc.: for a fundraising plan and board education to support fundraising efforts. $29,980.

Friends of the Rappahannock: for the creation of a fundraising plan, updates to the customer relationship management system, and staff training. $10,247.

Harford Land Trust, Inc.: for a group of urban and rural land trusts to learn together and increase fundraising capacity. $30,000.

Interfaith Partners for the Chesapeake (IPC): for an adaptive capacity building project to create a spatial data set of faith-owned properties in Maryland and Lancaster Pennsylvania. $29,934.

Lancaster Farmland Trust: for analysis of technology needs and implementation of technology upgrades to enhance engagement programs. $27,780.

National Wildlife Federation: for four leadership and management trainings for the Young Professionals of Color mentorship program. $30,000.

Northern Virginia Conservation Trust: for the development of a strategic conservation plan. $17,249.

Otter Point Creek Alliance: for website design and re-branding. $24,250.

Oyster Recovery Partnership, Inc.: for contractual services for a diversity, equity, inclusion, and justice assessment and plan and an updated constituent relationship management system. $30,000.

Potomac Conservancy: for anti-racism training for board members and integration of diversity, equity, inclusion, and justice strategies into the strategic plan and organization processes. $30,000.

Potomac Riverkeeper Network: for contractual services for a diversity, equity, inclusion, and justice assessment and training. $29,998.

Scenic Rivers Land Trust, Inc.: for executive leadership training. $15,000.

West Virginia Rivers Coalition: for improved social media and virtual communications. $12,480.

Chesapeake Oyster Innovation Award Program

The Chesapeake Oyster Innovation Award Program is a partnership between the Chesapeake Oyster Alliance and the Chesapeake Bay Trust that funds projects that meet any of the following three goals: increase knowledge about oyster fisheries or oyster aquaculture, advance in small-scale technologies for either increasing oyster population or oyster aquaculture, and increase in oyster fishery or aquaculture measurement/monitoring techniques or activities. For information about this grant program click here.

Friends of the Rappahannock: for an educational program, to increase knowledge about oyster aquaculture and health among landowners and local stakeholders within the Northern Neck and Middle Peninsula of Virginia. $4,715.

Hoopers Island Oyster Company: for a setting trailer prototype to allow oyster production to begin earlier in the season and in a ‘bio-safe’ environment that reduces risk of disease. $4,997.

James River Association: for an educational program for K-12 students in the Newport News public school system. $4,969.

Morgan State University – Patuxent Environmental and Aquatic Research Laboratory: for the development of a series of educational videos about oysters. $4,810.

Nansemond Indian Tribal Association: for the development of educational materials for K-12 students in the Hampton Roads area. $5,000.

Severn River Association, Inc.: for the creation of the Oyster Reef Dive Program to enhance reef monitoring. $5,000.

Virginia Institute of Marine Science: for the expansion of a post-settlement oyster monitoring program. $5,000.

Washington College: for the creation of an oyster focused curriculum for 9-12th grade students. $4,487.

Community Engagement and Restoration Mini Grants

This program is designed to engage Maryland residents in activities that enhance communities, engage residents, and improve natural resources by funding small-scale activities such as tree plantings, rain gardens, and community cleanups, among others. For information about this grant program click here.

City of Frederick: for the installation of six raised garden beds and one rain barrel to promote community wellness through sustainable, local food supplies and water conservation practices. $3,800.

College of Southern Maryland: for support of a pilot Butterflies for a Better Bay program, which will involve the creation of five native gardens and outreach and education events to engage families in the fostering of Monarch butterflies. $4,998.

Cottage City: for enhancement of the Cottage City Community Garden through the installation of rain barrels, a pergola, and a green house. $2,500.

Delaware Maryland Synod ELCA: for planting 80 trees on congregation properties throughout Maryland, with a focus on the intersection of the environmental and spiritual values of stewardship. $4,984.

Southern Maryland Audubon Society: for the creation of two community gardens at the Dorchester Community center and workshops to demonstrate the importance of native plants. $5,000.

The High 5 Initiative, Inc.: for six community cleanup events focused on the Susquehanna, North East and Elk Rivers in Cecil County, Maryland. $5,000.

Tilghman on Chesapeake Community Association: for the implementation of phase 2 of the Island Club Preserve non-tidal wetland restoration project, to plant 10 additional native trees and 116 native shrubs on community property. $3,814.

Town of Thurmont: for a residential rain barrel distribution program and a workshop to educate residents on water quality topics and strategies for stormwater management to reduce runoff. $1,250.

Tuscany Lombardy Community: for the removal of invasive species and replacement with native trees and plants on the historic Tuscany Lombardy Community property and the creation of a video to promote this project by local students. $4,500.

Environmental Education Grant Program

The Environmental Education Grant Program funds initiatives and programs that advance environmental literacy and result in students gaining the knowledge, skills, and appreciation for nature to take responsible actions to protect and restore their local environment. For information about this grant program click here.

Adkins Arboretum: for a sustainable partnership with ShoreRivers that will advance organizational capacity to provide environmental literacy programs and teacher professional development. $29,889.

Annapolis Maritime Museum & Park: for an outdoor classroom at Back Creek Nature Park. $13,000.

Anne Arundel County Public Schools, Arlington Echo Outdoor Education Center: for an environmental literacy program focused on the Severn River for all 9th graders in the Environmental Science course. $73,620.

Backyard Basecamp, Inc.: for an outdoor classroom at BLISS Meadows. $13,850.

Dance Exchange: for an arts-integrated environmental literacy pilot for kindergarten students in Prince George’s County Public Schools. $30,319.

ShoreRivers: for an environmental literacy program for all 4th and 9th graders at Kent County Public Schools. $119,915.

ShoreRivers: for an outdoor classroom at New Directions Learning Academy. $20,000.

Washington County Public Schools: for the integration of Meaningful Watershed Educational Experiences (MWEEs) in 2nd and 6th grade at Washington County Public Schools. $39,952.

Worcester County Public Schools: for a district-wide environmental literacy plan and program for all 9th and 10th graders. $109,455.

Montgomery County Watershed Restoration Outreach Grant Program

The Montgomery County Watershed Restoration and Outreach Grant Program is a partnership between the Montgomery County Government and the Chesapeake Bay Trust that funds public outreach and stewardship projects, community-based restoration water quality implementation projects, and litter reduction projects in the Anacostia River Watershed through trash trap maintenance and monitoring. For information about this grant program click here.

Alliance for the Chesapeake Bay: for green infrastructure practices and a watershed outreach project. $90,000.

Anacostia Riverkeeper: for green infrastructure practices at two sites in the Anacostia Watershed. $62,000.

Anacostia Riverkeeper: for Sligo Creek water quality monitoring. $30,242.

Anacostia Riverkeeper: for trash trap maintenance and monitoring. $50,000.

Audubon Naturalist Society of the Central Atlantic States, Inc.: for a conservation landscape training program for LatinX residents. $29,983.

Audubon Naturalist Society of the Central Atlantic States, Inc.: for a watershed stewardship engagement project for the LatinX community. $20,836.

Bannockburn Community Club: for an impervious surface removal and green infrastructure project. $50,000.

Casey Trees: for a street tree project. $75,000.

Friends of Sligo Creek: for green infrastructure practices at the Carolyn Condominium. $60,061.

Interfaith Partners for the Chesapeake (IPC): for a virtual watershed restoration training program. $9,571.

Little Falls Watershed Alliance: for an innovative water quality monitoring project using autonomous environmental robots. $30,000.

Little Falls Watershed Alliance: for a permeable paver project in the Overlook Community. $32,635.

National Wildlife Federation: for al native plant outreach project for the faith-based community. $49,953.

Potomac Riverkeeper Network: for delivery of a watershed stewardship and pollution awareness campaign. $29,998.

University System of Maryland Foundation, Inc.: for a green infrastructure design plan for the Glenwood Recreation Club. $20,000.

Prince George's County Stormwater Stewardship Grant Program

The Prince George’s County Stormwater Stewardship Grant Program is a partnership between the Prince George’s County Government and the Chesapeake Bay Trust to fund on-the-ground restoration activities that improve neighborhoods, improve water quality, and engage Prince George’s County residents in the restoration and protection of the local rivers and streams of Prince George’s County. For information about this grant program click here.

Central Kenilworth Avenue Revitalization Community Development Corporation, Inc.: for planting 300 trees on residential properties and a community event on the importance of tree planting. $133,736.

Centro de Apoyo Familiar: for a stewardship-building community engagement program on stormwater runoff issues and the Rain Check Rebate program. $15,000.

City of Hyattsville: for a green alleyway design that uses permeable pavers and serves as a pilot project that can be replicated. $36,702.

City of Mount Rainier: for the installation of 16 rain gardens along 30th Avenue and 33rd Avenue rights-of-way. $142,441.

Defensores de la Cuenca: for the plan to develop a future “Academia de Defensores de Cuencas” that will train Spanish-speaking residents on watershed-health issues and restoration projects. $15,000.

EcoLatinos, Inc.: for the promotion of the Prince George’s County Rain Check Rebate Program to Spanish-speaking residents. $29,748.

Mount Rainier Elementary School PTO: for removal of impervious surface. $5,000.

National Wildlife Federation: for a multi-faith effort to promote stormwater management resources through a faith based “Caring for Creation” approach. $29,999.

Neighborhood Design Center: for a virtual, maintenance-focused program aimed at youth and fostering green career-building connections. $30,000.

Town of Edmonston: for the installation of 10 rain gardens on Gallatin Street. $142,803.

Washington Area Bicyclist Association: for planning bilingual litter cleanups and bike rides to increase awareness of local natural resources and to promote stewardship. $5,000.

Sponsorship

This program aims to support events that will increase awareness or knowledge on issues pertaining to restoration and protection of the Chesapeake Bay region natural resources and/or promote the Trust’s major sources of revenue. For information about this program click here.

Maryland Association for Environmental and Outdoor Education (MAEOE): for support of the 36th annual Maryland Association for Environmental and Outdoor Education conference. $1,000.

May 2021

Anne Arundel County Watershed Restoration

The Anne Arundel County Watershed Restoration Grant Program is a partnership between the Anne Arundel County Bureau of Watershed Protection and Restoration, the City of Annapolis, and the Chesapeake Bay Trust. This program funds projects to reduce pollutants through the implementation of watershed restoration practices. Projects must accomplish on-the-ground restoration that treats rainwater runoff from impervious surfaces or demonstrates the accomplishment of another metric that will help the County and City meet local water quality and runoff reduction improvement goals. For more information about this grant program, click here.

Arundel Rivers Federation: for the implementation of water quality improvement practice that includes daylighting a 252-foot storm drainpipe and replacement with a riparian floodplain and pilot channel to provide water quality treatment, new pollinator habitat, and flood control. $298,665.

Arundel Rivers Federation: for the restoration of approximately 1,000 linear feet of stream in Caffrey Run, a tributary to Harness Creek in the South River Watershed and located in Quiet Waters Park. $221,960.

Arundel Rivers Federation: for the restoration of 1,686 linear feet of stream in Broad Creek within the South River through Regenerative Stream Conveyance and valley restoration to reconnect the stream to its floodplain, increase flood attenuation, reduce nutrient and sediment outputs, and enhance wetland habitat. $302,569.

Cedar Ridge Homes Association: for the implementation of the Green Alley 2 project to control flooding and degradation issues within the alley, reduce runoff to Chesapeake Bay, beautify the common area, and to educate neighbors on taking steps in their own backyards to help further mitigate stormwater issues. $55,476.

Chesapeake Rivers Association, Inc.: for the design and permitting of the Back Creek Headwaters Restoration Project, which includes both the Phase I Annapolis Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (SPCA) design project and the Phase II Mariner’s Point Community Association design project. $169,969.

Chesapeake Rivers Association, Inc.: for implementation of a Regenerative Stream Channel (RSC) to provide greater nutrient processing and improved connection to the floodplains/ wetlands, decommission the existing dam, and removal of the riser and pipe to replace the failing piped technology with current best management restoration practices. $274,880.

The Tecumseh Condominium: for the development of a Stormwater Management Design Plan for the Tecumseh Condominium community. $32,250.

Chesapeake Conservation Corps Projects

The Chesapeake Conservation Corps is a partnership between the Maryland Department of Natural Resources, BGE an Exelon Company, the National Park Service, and the Chesapeake Bay Trust. The Corps is a leadership program that provides young adults (ages 18-25) with hands-on environmental and leadership experience through placements with nonprofit or government agencies for one-year terms of service in the Chesapeake Bay region. To learn more about this program, click here.

Alliance for the Chesapeake Bay: for a community engagement project focused on native pollinators. $1,031.

Amazing Grace Lutheran Church: for the restoration of green space at Amazing Port Street Commons. $1,101.

American Chestnut Land Trust: for the creation of educational materials and a monitoring program about native amphibians. $1,249.

American Chestnut Land Trust: for invasive species removal and trail maintenance at an All Hands on Deck Event for the Chesapeake Conservation Corps 2021 cohort. $1,500.

Arlington Echo Outdoor Education Center: to provide students access to an “outdoor window” during virtual learning and severe weather events. $1,250.

Audubon Naturalist Society of the Central Atlantic States, Inc.: for the removal of invasive pachysandra and planting of native trees. $1,240.

Baltimore Tree Trust: for the implementation of a transgender memorial tree planting project. $1,250.

Camp Puh’tok for Boys and Girls, Inc.: for a MWEE focused All Hands on Deck Event with the Chesapeake Conservation Corps 2021 cohort. $1,468.

Camp Puh’tok for Boys and Girls, Inc.: for wetland and pond restoration educational signage. $1,250.

Friends of Gwynns Falls / Leakin Park: for a mural and outdoor educational signage. $1,215.

The Izaak Walton League of America: for water quality monitoring at Muddy Branch stream. $459.

Lower Shore Land Trust: for the restoration of Olive Lippoldt Tidal Wetland Garden. $1,250.

Maryland Coastal Bays Program: for the creation of educational materials focused on a new terrapin nesting site. $1,250.

Maryland Coastal Bays Program: for the creation of terrapin nesting sites at an All Hands on Deck Event with the Chesapeake Conservation Corps 2021 cohort. $1,500.

Maryland Department of Natural Resources (DNR): for the creation of a mussel monitoring and restoration program. $1,119.

National Aquarium: for the Jonestown Marine Debris Initiative, a plastics and litter community evaluation. $1,250.

National Wildlife Federation: for the creation of a nature play space. $1,250.

Patapsco Heritage Greenway, Inc: for the creation of a water quality map, and the identification of gaps in data and new monitoring sites. $1,250.

Severn River Association, Inc.: for the creation of an oyster reef monitoring program. $902.

Severn River Association, Inc.: for a land survey education All Hands on Deck Event with the Chesapeake Conservation Corps 2021 cohort. $1,496.

Smithsonian Environmental Research Center: for the public engagement about, and monitoring of, the river otter. $1,250.

Sultana Education Foundation: for the creation of a hydroponics and aquaponics exhibit. $1,250.

The Nature Conservancy: for a study of pyrogenic carbon in soils at the Nassawango Creek Preserve. $1,250.

Community Engagement and Restoration Mini Grants

This program is designed to engage Maryland residents in activities that enhance communities, engage residents, and improve natural resources by funding small-scale activities such as tree plantings, rain gardens, and community cleanups, among others. For information about this grant program click here.

3200 Carlisle Block Association, Inc.: for planting 30 street trees to raise awareness and to reduce stormwater runoff. $5,000.

Brown Memorial Park Avenue Presbyterian Church: for the installation of two cisterns and conservation landscaping. $4,990.

C.A.R.E. Community Association: for the transformation of a vacant lot into a pollinator garden. $4,821.

Laurel For the Patuxent, Inc.: for a pollinator garden at Sweitzer Park and a campaign to promote residential conservation landscaping. $4,671.

Magothy Meadows Homeowners Association: to plant 18 native trees and 10 shrubs. $2,945.

Nature Worx, Inc.: for nature-based group sessions to promote well-being and environmental stewardship amongst Brooklyn residents. $4,900.

Rails-to-Trails Conservancy: for listening sessions and guided tours to gain residential input on the Baltimore Greenway. $5,000.

St. Philip’s Episcopal Church: for the enhancement of an existing native conservation landscaping and information sessions on the importance of native plants. $2,992.

Townhomes at the Pointe I: for a 2,000 square foot rain garden and native tree installation to treat stormwater runoff. $4,553.

District of Columbia Urban Agriculture Small Grants Program

The District of Columbia Urban Agriculture Small Grants Program is a partnership between the Chesapeake Bay Trust and the District of Columbia Department of Energy and Environment Office of Urban Agriculture. This grant program seeks to provide funding to building capacity for crop production and distribution, and to increase knowledge within farmers and District residents through agricultural education experiences. To learn more about this grant program, click here.

Designgreen LLC: for utility and topographic surveys to further develop a community green space concept plan, production of a mini documentary including resident interviews, and support for student internship projects as connected to the original Takoma Community Collaborative project. $4,960.

National Wildlife Federation: for the creation of a cohort of three churches, development of a planting plan, and an additional workshop for Ward 7 and 8 congregations on the RiverSmart Communities Program as connected to the original Sacred Grounds project. $4,893.

Near Southeast Community Partners: for the addition of educational sessions,one field trip, and one online training video for participants of a stormwater management workforce training as connected to the original Green Career Training for DC Latinos project. $3,600.

The Green Scheme: for an educational video and increased outreach to residents living near Oxon Run as connected to the original Ward 8 Water Watchers project. $5,000.

Urban Learning and Teaching Center: for the addition of outdoor programming for Cleveland Elementary School’s fourth and fifth grade students as connected ot the original Waterway Guardians in Shaw project. $5,005.

Ward 8 Woods Conservancy: for increased activity days involving litter clean up and invasive species removal by park stewards as conencted to the original Restore Fort Stanton Park project. $4,994.

Environmental Education Mini Grants

This program is designed to increase student awareness and involvement in the restoration and protection of our region’s natural resources by increasing access to programs that provide Meaningful Watershed Educational Experiences (MWEEs). For information about this grant program click here.

Achilles Elementary School: for 380 pre-k through twelfth graders to learn about healthy ecosystems and waterways. $2,685.

Anacostia Watershed Society: for 200 elementary students to learn about stormwater runoff and watershed health. $4,876.

Anne Arundel County Public Schools, Arlington Echo Outdoor Education Center: for arts and environmental education professional development for 30 teachers. $5,000.

Arlington Elementary Middle School #234: for 350 students to investigate the importance of soil health and impacts of stormwater. $5,000.

Blue Sky Fund: for 925 fourth graders to investigate the water quality in the James River watershed. $5,000.

Crow’s Nest Research Center: for environmental education professional development for 12 teachers. $5,000.

Eastern Shore Land Conservancy’s Sassafras Environmental Education Center: for 435 tenth and eleventh graders to conduct water quality investigations on Turners Creek. $5,000.

Fairfax County Park Foundation Inc.,: for 2,250 fourth and fifth graders to learn about watershed health and plant native plants. $5,000.

Friends of Richmond Community High School: for 75 ninth and tenth graders to investigate climate change impacts on the health of local waterways. $5,000.

Garrett Heights Elementary Middle School: for 326 pre-k through eighth graders to install an outdoor classroom and paint storm drains. $5,000.

Irvine Nature Center: for 30 students to learn about local biodiversity. $4,780.

James River Association: for 200 fifth graders in Henrico County Public Schools to study stormwater pollution and paint storm drains. $5,000.

James River Association: for 10th through 12th graders from Newport News Public Schools to learn about oysters and micro-plastics. $4,999.

James River Association: for 300 students to study stormwater pollution and 25 teachers to receive environmental education professional development training. $5,000.

Lacawac Sanctuary: for third through fifth graders in Wayne County to investigate the health of and human impacts on the Lacawac River. $5,000.

Live It Learn It: for 200 fifth graders to investigate and reduce plastic pollution in the Anacostia River. $5,000.

Maryland Association for Environmental and Outdoor Education (MAEOE): for outdoor education professional development for 25 middle school teachers. $4,995.

One Montgomery Green: for 25 students to learn how to reduce plastic waste. $5,000.

Severn River Association, Inc.: for 100 students to learn about local watershed health. $4,957.

Skyline High School: for students to learn about sustainable agriculture and plant a pollinator garden. $5,000.

St. Martins-in the-Field Episcopal School: for 227 students to learn about the impact of food systems and install a garden. $5,000.

St. Peter’s Episcopal School: for the installation of an outdoor classroom. $4,750.

The Banner School, Inc.: for 155 kindergarten through eighth graders to install native plants to decrease stormwater pollution. $3,154.

The Springwell School, Inc.: for 15 students to learn about composting and sustainable agriculture. $5,000.

Thomas Johnson Elementary/Middle School: for 70 eighth graders to study marine debris issues. $5,000.

Thomas Johnson Elementary/Middle School: for 60 seventh graders to study marine debris issues. $5,000.

Thomas Johnson Elementary/Middle School: for 50 sixth graders to study marine debris issues. $5,000.

EPA Goal Implementation Team Project Support

The EPA Goal Implementation Team Project Support Program is a partnership between the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Chesapeake Bay Trust. This program is designed to invite entities experienced in various aspects of fisheries, watershed science and policy, watershed stewardship, outreach and training, climate resilience, submerged aquatic vegetation (sav), and other watershed issues to submit proposals to advance specific outcomes of the 2014 Chesapeake Bay Watershed Agreement. For information about this program click here.

Center for Watershed Protection, Inc.: for Scope 5- management approaches to reduce stressors of stream health. $47,500.

Center for Watershed Protection, Inc.: for Scope 3- maintaining forests in stream corridor restoration and sharing lessons learned. $90,000.

Chesapeake Conservancy: for Scope 11- cultivating and strengthening partnerships with underrepresented stakeholders. $65,000.

Eastern Research Group, Inc.: for Scope 4- planning for clean water- local government workshops. $69,983.

OpinionWorks LLC: for Scope 1- public access research. $74,692.

Skeo Solutions, Inc.: for Scope 10- developing standards and metrics to target the conservation of “green spaces” in underrepresented and low-income urban and rural communities. $69,943.

University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science (UMCES): for Scope 2- a social science road map for advancing Chesapeake Bay Program partnership goals. $74,990.

University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science (UMCES): for Scope 12- cost effective denitrification measurement in oyster reefs. $80,000.

University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science (UMCES): for Scope 7- forage indicator development- using environmental drivers to assess forage status. $60,000.

Virginia Institute of Marine Science, School of Marine Science, College of William & Mary: for Scope 8- synthesis of shoreline, sea level rise, and marsh migration data for wetland restoration targeting. $72,418.

Virginia Institute of Marine Science, School of Marine Science, College of William & Mary: for Scope 6- modeling climate impacts on submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV) in the Chesapeake Bay. $75,000.

Green Streets, Green Jobs, Green Towns

The Green Streets, Green Jobs, Green Towns Grant Program is a partnership between the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the Maryland Department of Natural Resources, and the Chesapeake Bay Trust. This program is designed to help communities develop and implement plans that reduce stormwater runoff, increase the number and amount of green spaces in urban areas, improve the health of local streams and the Chesapeake Bay, and enhance quality of life and community livability. To learn more about this grant program, click here.

Backyard Basecamp, Inc.: for green infrastructure practices at BLISS Meadows in Baltimore, Maryland. $45,465.

Bolton Hill Community Association: for a green streets concept plan for the Bolton Hill and Madison Park communities in Baltimore City. $15,000.

Bon Secours Unity Properties: for a community greening project in Baltimore, Maryland. $34,065.

Capon Bridge Revitalization Group, Inc.: for green infrastructure practices in Capon Bridge, West Virginia. $78,500.

Center for Watershed Protection, Inc.: for a stormwater retrofit pollution load reduction calculator. $16,365.

City of Annapolis: for green infrastructure design and implementation in Annapolis, Maryland. $65,000.

City of Frederick: for a green infrastructure master plan in Frederick, Maryland. $15,000.

City of Hyattsville: for a green streets concept plan in Hyattsville, Maryland. $15,000.

City of Lancaster, Pennsylvania: for green infrastructure practices in Lancaster, Pennsylvania. $151,251.

City of Salisbury: for green infrastructure practices in Salisbury, Maryland. $100,000.

Civic Works, Inc.: for a vacant lot greening project in South Clifton Park. $16,500.

Commissioners of Ridgely: for a green streets concept plan for the Town of Ridgely, Maryland. $14,940.

International City County Management Association: for a white paper on local government resrouces for financing green infrastructure practices. $19,750.

Maryland State Fair & Agricultural Society, Inc.: for a green infrastructure master plan for the Maryland State Fairgrounds in Timonium, Maryland. $30,000.

Nanticoke Watershed Alliance: for green infrastructure practices in Seaford, Delaware. $100,000.

Nature Sacred: for a white paper on the health-economics-based case for incorporating nature and green infrastructure into hospitals and other health-facility grounds. $20,000.

Neighborhood Design Center: for a green infrastructure community culture analysis in Prince Georges County, Maryland. $15,000.

Oxford Borough: for a green infrastructure concept plan for Oxford, Pennsylvania. $14,847.

Prince George’s County, Maryland: for a green infrastructure design and community greening project in Mt. Rainier, Maryland. $80,000.

ReBUILD Metro, Inc. (f/k/a TRF Development Partners, Inc.): for a green infrastructure master plan for Greenmount Park in Baltimore City. $15,000.

Ridge to Reefs: for green infrastructure practices in Park Heights, Maryland. $50,000.

Seton Hill Association, Inc.: for a tree planting project in the Seton Hill Community in Baltimore City. $15,283.

ShoreRivers: for a green infrastructure concept plan for Saint Mary Refuge of Sinners and Star of the Sea Parish in Cambridge, Maryland. $12,432.

ShoreRivers: for green infrastructure practices at Washington College, in Chestertown, Maryland. $89,802.

The 6th Branch: for a tree nursery and youth workforce training program in Baltimore, Maryland. $47,500.

The Community Ecology Institute: for a green infrastructure engineered design for Atholton High School in Columbia, Maryland. $30,000.

Town of Bath: for green infrastructure practices in Bath, West Virginia. $30,000.

Town of Bel Air: for a green infrastructure concept plan for Bel Air, Maryland. $14,850.

Town of Galena: for a green infrastructure concept plan for Galena, Maryland. $16,750.

Town of Glen Echo: for a green streets concept plan for Glen Echo, Maryland. $14,700.

Town of Laurel: for green infrastructure practices at the Dunbar Building in Laurel, Delaware. $99,000.

University of Maryland College Park: for a green street engineered design in Prince George’s County, Maryland. $20,000.

Pooled Monitoring Initiative

The Chesapeake Bay Trust, the Maryland Department of Natural Resources, the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation through the Environmental Protection Agency’s Chesapeake Bay Program Office, the Maryland Department of Transportation State Highway Administration, the Montgomery County Department of Environmental Protection, and other partners announce a Request for Proposals for its Restoration Research award program. The goal of this research program is to answer several key restoration questions that are a barrier to watershed restoration project implementation. To learn more about this grant program, click here.

Ecosystem Planning and Restoration: to research if stream restoration can be done without diverting the stream around the construction site during construction. $354,576.

Tetra Tech, Inc.: to consider future climate change impacts to rainfall patterns and use this to update stormwater designs. $228,436.

The Pennsylvania State University: to assess how well stormwater practices work when too much road salt enters them and what solutions can be used to keep practices working well. $196,183.

University of Maryland Baltimore County: to measure how stormwater management facilities protect aquatic life from hot temperatures. $201,774.

University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science (UMCES): to use a novel method that detects genetic material to assess stream health and restoration success. $193,772.

Sponsorship

This program aims to support events that will increase awareness or knowledge on issues pertaining to restoration and protection of the Chesapeake Bay region natural resources and/or promote the Trust’s major sources of revenue. For information about this program click here.

Arundel Rivers Federation: for support of the 2021 Half Shell event, to present the State of the Rivers report card. $250.

Center for Watershed Protection, Inc.: for support of the 2021 National Watershed and Stormwater Conference. $1,000.

End Time Harvest Ministries: for the 2021 Port Towns Youth Council (PTYC) and Pathways to Career Success (PTCS) Program virtual graduation scholarship. $1,000.

Anne Arundel Watershed Stewards Academy: for support of the 10th annual Watershed Stewards Academy conference. $1,000.

Forever Maryland Foundation: for support of the 2021 Maryland Land Conservation Conference. $1,000.

Harford Land Trust, Inc.: for a month-long, self-guided event designed to increase awareness and appreciation of local natural resources. $1,000.

Lower Shore Land Trust: for support of events to promote native plants, conservation landscaping, and small-scale practices such as rain barrels and rain gardens. $500.

Neighborhood Creative Arts Center: for support of the 2021 NatureFest. $983.

Watershed Assistance Grant Program

This program supports watershed restoration project design assistance, watershed planning, and programmatic development associated with protection and restoration programs and projects that lead to improved water quality in the Maryland region. For information about this grant program click here.

Gaiacene Services LLC: for technical assistance services for the Community-Based Organization Capacity Building Initiative. $145,000.

Engaging Diverse Groups in Environmental Stewardship is Essential

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In 2015, the Maryland League of Conservation Voters Education Fund, working through their Chispa Maryland (Chispa) program, received an award through the Prince George’s County Stormwater Stewardship Grant Program to engage members of Prince George’s County Latino community in educational experiences designed to improve local water quality and the health of the community. Through this project, Chispa Maryland also sought to establish strong, longstanding leadership within the community to carry the efforts of this project forward.

Chispa Maryland was launched by the Maryland League of Conservation Voters Education Fund in 2014. This group works with Latino families, community groups, faith-based organizations, and elected officials to identify and address environmental issues. Chispa seeks to empower the Latino community to take action to protect natural resources and build healthy neighborhoods.

This project focused on working with Latino community members predominantly from the Transforming Neighborhoods Initiative (TNI) designated area of Langley Park. The TNI is a county effort that aims at uplifting neighborhoods with significant needs. Chispa began by consulting with several Latino community leaders, Prince George’s County agencies, and other Latino-serving organizations to develop a curriculum and delivery plan that best served the needs of the community. The resulting curriculum comprised of both in-class and hands-on learning experiences. The in-class learning consisted of an introduction to the water cycle, the impact of stormwater runoff on the environment, and the actions that can be taken to manage stormwater runoff. The classroom session stressed the interconnectedness of individual actions and the cumulative impact these actions have on natural resources. Chispa also illuminated the relation between local water quality and the health and quality of life of the community.

The outdoor active learning sessions were designed to allow participants to experience firsthand and put into practice some of the concepts covered during the in-class session. A partnership with Anacostia Watershed Society (AWS) brought Latino families and individuals out onto the Anacostia River through boat trips. AWS lead conversations on the biodiversity and water quality of the Anacostia River, as well as the impact of stormwater runoff on the Anacostia and surrounding streams and rivers. The boat trip sessions concluded with participants identifying the various ways their actions impacted natural resources, to change behaviors with negative impacts. Participants also had the chance to implement low impact development projects at the Langley Park Community Center. Participants created a 1,000 sq. ft. native plants garden and installed six rain barrels throughout the community center.

After the completion of both the in-class and hands-on activities, Chispa conducted leadership training with a group of participants that demonstrated a commitment to improving their natural resources and build resilient communities. Six instructional sessions were held and a total of 13 participants completed the training and were graduated as promotores (trained individuals who take on an educational role). The training of promotores enhances the sustainability of this project, as these leaders are empowered to lead and coordinate projects in their communities that promote environmental education and increase community participation in environmental activities.

Congratulations to Chispa Maryland on a successful and engaging project!

Introducing Our 22nd Treasure the Chesapeake Silent Auction!

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From Baltimore City to the Eastern Shore, our Treasure the Chesapeake’s silent auction offers chances to cherish treasures of the Bay throughout Maryland. We are thrilled to have so many local businesses supporting our event and our mission. There is something for everyone so be sure to attend the event on August 20th and bid to take home a Treasure of the Chesapeake for your very own!

Don’t see your favorite organization listed? Let us know and we’ll reach out to them! info@cbtrust.org

Parkdale Schools the Community on Stormwater Management

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Schools play a huge role not only in educating their students but also in acting as a center for resources and a vehicle for change and improvement in their communities. The Prince George’s County Stormwater Stewardship Program is a partnership between the Chesapeake Bay Trust and Prince George’s County Department of the Environment that recognizes the potential these institutions, amongst others, have to engage the community and implement projects that improve the water quality of local streams and rivers.

Parkdale High School, located in Riverdale, received a grant in 2015 to carry out impactful learning opportunities and hands-on engagement in environmental stewardship and stormwater management. Parkdale worked with several partners on this project, including the Clean Water Partnership, Anacostia Watershed Society (AWS) and the William S. Schmidt Outdoor Education Center. A professional development workshop was held for teachers and staff to equip them with knowledge on successfully implementing environmental literacy programs. The school was also able to host and mentor 13 student interns from the Prince George’s County Summer Youth Enrichment Program. The students were able to partake in a variety of educational activities, such as maintaining an edible food forest in front of the school’s campus and visiting several facilities working to protect our natural resources, including the Prince George’s County Department of the Environment, where they learned of the County’s actions to better manage and protect the environment. The students also visited Bladensburg Waterfront Park to participate in a boat tour led by the AWS, where the students learned about initiatives to clean the river and restore native wildlife populations and habitats.

Educational signage placed at the site of the installed stormwater management practice. Click to view larger!

Parkdale was also able to address the stormwater management needs of their campus. The school installed a series of permeable surfaces that allow water to infiltrate into the ground while filtering out pollutants. Excess water overflows from the permeable surfaces to three different types of infiltration areas installed next to the permeable surfaces, that help to further filter out pollutants and let the water slowly absorb into the ground. Educational signage was also installed at the project site to educate the Parkdale community on how the project functions to treat stormwater runoff.

 

Parkdale successfully installed a functional and educational stormwater management practice, while also engaging their community in stewardship. Congratulations to Parkdale High School on an exemplary project!

The Chesapeake Bay Trust Announces Awardees

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The Chesapeake Bay Trust has a rigorous grant review process: every proposal submitted over $5,000 is sent to members of a Technical Review Committee (TRC) and is reviewed and scored quantitatively by at least three external peers who are experts in their fields. The Board of Trustees meets 4 times per year to review and approve all TRC recommended proposals. Proposals for $5,000 or less are reviewed by two or more technical experts on the Chesapeake Bay Trust program team.

Capacity Building Initiatives

May 2020

Consensus Building Institute, Inc.: to assess the capacity and identify strategic capacity-building opportunities for action in six targeted regions of the Chesapeake Bay watershed to meaningfully advance progress toward water quality objectives. $200,000.

Chesapeake Conservation Corps Mini Award Program

May 2020

Accokeek Foundation: for an education campaign at Piscataway National Park to reduce the spread of invasive species. $1,250.
Accokeek Foundation: for invasive species removal at Foundation George’s Piscataway National Park. $1,068.
Allegany County Commissioners: for the creation of a used cooking oil recycling program and drop-off site. $1,250.
Alliance for the Chesapeake Bay: for the creation of an environmental Chesapeake education elective for 7th and 8th graders at the Summit School. $1,225.
American Chestnut Land Trust: for the restoration and protection of the nature trail system near Parker’s Creek. $1,250.
American Chestnut Land Trust: for the installation of a native edible garden to increase biodiversity and educate the public. $1,053.
American Chestnut Land Trust: for invasive species removal at Parkers Chestnut Land Creek and sustainable farming workshop. $1,500.
Audubon Naturalist Society of the Central Atlantic States, Inc.: for the removal of invasive species at Woodend Nature Sanctuary in preparation for a native planting. $1,250.
Audubon Naturalist Society of the Central Atlantic States, Inc.: for the restoration of a forested ecotone at Woodend Nature Sanctuary. $1,250.
C&O Canal Trust: for the expansion of the ‘Canal for All’ program to reach a more diverse group of youth. $1,250.
Chesapeake Conservancy: for support of the National Park Service’s first National Junior Ranger day in the Chesapeake region. $1,216.
Chesapeake Conservancy: for the development of an Open Space Preservation Opportunity Mapping tool to assist FEMA in identifying at-risk communities and assisting in flood prevention. $1,000.
ECO City Farms: for the installation of two self-sustaining keyhole gardens in Bladensburg. $1,250.
Environmental Concern, Inc.: for the installation of a drip-irrigation system at a nursery to reduce water usage. $1,250.
Frederick County Office of Sustainability and Environmental Resources: for signage to support tree planting in County Office of Creagerstown Park. $320.
Friends of Carrie Murray Nature Center, Inc.: for supplies and equipment to support the Carrie Murray Nature Center’s Maryland Green Center certification. $1,158.
Friends of Jug Bay Wetlands Sanctuary: for the implementation of a community science program identifying sources of trash at Jug Bay Wetlands Sanctuary. $933.
Hood College: for research on nano-bubble technology as a solution to toxic algae growth across the watershed. $1,211.
Howard County Conservancy: for Howard County high school students to participate in “The Great Climate Change Challenge” which includes lessons, a field experience, and action project focused on the issue of climate change. $746.
Maryland Coastal Bays Program: for the creation of the “Living Local: Small-Scale, Large Impact” farming with sustainable practices initiative on the Eastern Shore. $1,250.
Maryland Coastal Bays Program: for the development of a groundwater network to monitor a restoration project at Ilia Fehrer Nature Reserve. $1,250.
Maryland Coastal Bays Program: for native species plantings and workshop at Assateague National Seashore. $1,500.
Maryland Department of Natural Resources: Chesapeake Bay SAV Watchers Trainings. $1,096.
Maryland Environmental Services: for the study of the effects of riparian buffers on the temperature of the Loch Raven Reservoir to determine the likelihood of trout survivability.  $1,250.
National Aquarium: for outreach and engagement of the Dundalk community relating to a shoreline restoration project at Watersedge Park. $1,236.
Patuxent River Park: for a Bald Cypress tree planting and installation of educational signage along the Patuxent River to mitigate erosion. $1,250.
Severn River Association, Inc.: for the mapping and creation of a database to track submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV) on the Severn River. $320.
ShoreRivers: for the creation of a mussel growing program for homeowners along the Sassafrass River. $1,250.
ShoreRivers: for the creation of the “Green Self-Esteem” program reaching underserved youth through an after-school program in partnership with Building African American Minds. $1,250.
ShoreRivers: for the repair of walking trails and updates to the educational center at Horn Point Laboratory. $1,500.
Sultana Education Foundation: for the installation of an educational exhibit for students at Sultana Education Centers’ Holt Lab. $1,247.
The 6th Branch: for the expansion of Oliver Farm in East Baltimore, including the installation of raised garden beds to increase food security. $1,022.
The Community Ecology Institute: for construction of a demonstration plot of agrivoltaics to educate the public and specific groups about the benefits of land/solar energy generation in combating climate change. $1,250.
The Nature Conservancy: for research on the effects of Japanese Stiltgrass on the soil composition of a controlled burn area on Sidling Hill. $518.
The Nature Conservancy: for the study, analysis, and distribution of data on biological impacts of fires on oak and pine dominated forests of the Central Appalachian region of Maryland. $1,250.
Western Maryland Resource Conservation & Development Council (Inc.): for the removal of invasive water primrose and native planting. $1,250.

Anne Arundel County Forestry and Forested Land Protection Award Program

May 2020

Tidewater Colony Open Space Association: for an invasive species removal and reforestation project on five acres in the Tidewater Colony Community in Annapolis. $35,250.

Green Streets, Green Jobs, Green Towns (G3)

May 2020

Anacostia Watershed Society: for a community greening project addressing stormwater runoff in the Town Fairmount Heights. $32,878.
Audubon Naturalist Society of the Central Atlantic States, Inc.: for a permeable brick paver project at Woodend Nature Sanctuary in Chevy Chase. $13,243.
Baltimore City Department of Planning, Baltimore Office of Sustainability: for engineered designs to improve stormwater management at the Cab Calloway Legends Park in the City Baltimore.  $27,768.
Blue Water Baltimore: for planting 150 native trees in the Curtis Bay community in Baltimore. $49,892.
Borough of Marietta: to implement the design and permit drawings currently being completed for roadway and parking improvements along Furnace Road at Donegal Place. $237,515.
Capon Bridge Revitalization Group, Inc.: to redefine the civic core of Capon Bridge by upgrading the safety, environmental quality, and aesthetic appeal of Capon School Street. $28,880.
City of Lancaster, Pennsylvania: to improve pedestrian safety and slow traffic along Highland Avenue on the southern edge of Lancaster City. $100,000.
City of Portsmouth: to advance the conceptual design for Water Street Green Street and Park to design plans. $30,000.
City of Romney: to develop engineering designs for green infrastructure practices along West Birch Lane. $29,985.
Civic Works, Inc.: for three vacant lot greening projects in the Upton, Panway-Braddish, and Irvington communities in Baltimore City. $45,000.
Fauquier County: to construct wetland on the grounds of Fauquier High School. $30,000.
Hamilton-Lauraville Main Street Inc.: for a vacant lot revitalization project in Baltimore offering farmer’s markets, community activities, and green space. $30,000.
Joe’s Movement Emporium/World Arts Focus: for green street engineered design and art integration project in Mount Rainier. $30,000.
Montgomery County Department of Environmental Protection: for construction of rain gardens and Filterra tree box filters in the Glenmont Forest community in Silver Spring. $200,748.
Nanticoke Watershed Alliance: for engineering design for green streets in Seaford, DE. $38,735
Parks & People Foundation: for engineered design drawings for the Cecil Elementary School campus revitalization in Baltimore. $30,000.
Prince George’s County, Maryland: for four bioretention projects at the Publick Playhouse in Landover. $100,000.
Ridge to Reefs: for urban agriculture expansion, ecological restoration, and implementing stormwater management practices at Baltimore Living in Sustainable Simplicity Meadows. $50,000.
ShoreRivers.: for a parking lot restoration and green infrastructure project at American Legion Post 91 in Cambridge. $97,084.
ShoreRivers: for the installation of six bioretention projects to treat stormwater at Washington College in Chestertown. $100,000.
The 6th Branch: for a vacant lot greening project in the Broadway East community in Baltimore City. $50,000.
The Commissioners (Town) of Barnesville: to develop a green infrastructure concept addressing one inch of stormwater run-off. $14,960.
The Community Ecology Institute: to develop a green stormwater infrastructure concept plan for Atholton high school that takes a “walkable watershed” approach. $15,000.
Town of Colonial Beach: develop a green street engineered design for 1st street, spanning from Euclid Ave. to Jackson St. $29,935.
Town of Emmitsburg: to create a high-performing green street conceptual plan for North Seton Avenue to reduce the amount of stormwater runoff and pollution while incorporating flood hazard mitigation. $17,538.

Chesapeake Bay Program Goal Implementation Team Project Support

May 2020

Chesapeake Conservancy: to leverage experience with stakeholder outreach and engagement, landscape-scale data curation, and evaluation of effective methods and guidelines for implementing Landscape Impact Assessment Methods that are broadly applicable to multiple landscapes and geographies. $54,000.
Chesapeake Conservation Landscaping Council: for EPA GIT Scope #10: Correctional Conservation Collaborative: Achieving PA Forestry Goals through Workforce Development. $74,089.
Coastal Resources, Inc.: for the development of the “Maryland Stream Crossing Design Guidance: A Fish-Friendly Stream Crossing Design Handbook.” $48,038.
Green Fin Studio: for development of Technical Guidance Manual and Outreach Materials for small-scale submerged aquatic vegetation restoration in Chesapeake Bay and its Tidal Tributaries. $49,907.
Green Fin Studio: for scope 12: for cross-outcome watershed educational materials for local governments. $49,503.
Local Concepts LLC: for scope 9: developing a regional outdoor learning network to support MWEE implementation. $50,000.
SKEO Solutions, Inc.: for scope 7: targeted local outreach for green infrastructure in vulnerable areas. $64,817.
SKEO Solutions, Inc.: for targeted local outreach for green infrastructure in vulnerable areas. $14,973.
Tetra Tech, Inc.: Scope 11: Implementation of Chesapeake Healthy Watersheds Assessment in Maryland’s Tier II Watersheds. $54,974.
The RAND Corporation: Scope 2: Building a Bay-Wide Scorecard to Track Climate Resilience for Watershed Communities. $75,000.
Virginia Institute of Marine Science, School of Marine Science, College of William & Mary: for scope 3: Chesapeake Bay striped bass nursery habitat assessment. $84,989.

Community Engagement Mini Grant Program

May 2020

Baltimore Green Space: for 15 educational workshops regarding the many benefits of forest patches including stormwater, human health, and wildlife topics. $5,000.
Knox Presbyterian Church: for the installation of a native, pollinator-friendly plant garden with workshops on the benefits of native plants for watershed health and the impacts of pollution. $4,903.
Maryland Stadium Authority: for 15 community engagement maintenance events and installation of educational signage for the Oriole garden. $5,000.
St. Pius X Church: for a native planting and signage installation at a bioretention facility with information sessions. $3,603.
Town of New Market: for a residential rain barrel program to include education on water quality and the positive impact of utilizing rain barrels to reduce stormwater runoff into local watersheds. $2,400.
Town of Thurmont: for a residential rain barrel program to include education on water quality and the positive impact of utilizing rain barrels to reduce stormwater runoff into local watersheds. $1,250.

Anne Arundel County Watershed Protection

May 2020

Chesapeake Rivers Association, Inc.: for correcting a drainage problem on an existing sod farm. $242,567.
Loch Haven Civic Association: for the installation of a living shoreline, sand replenishment for beaches, and a planted shoreline. $129,034.
Severn River Association, Inc.: for the restoration of an eroding riverbank adjacent to the West Severna Park Community Association beach through the implementation of a living shoreline and the creation of intertidal marsh habitat. $32,277.
Arundel Rivers Federation: for implementation of a 1,300 linear foot stream restoration project at the Girl Scout’s Camp Woodlands in Annapolis.  $43,198.
Arundel Rivers Federation: for implementation of approximately 2,118 linear feet of stream restoration in the Beards Creek sub-watershed of the South River.  $349,312.
Arundel Rivers Federation: for the restoration of approximately 3,760 linear feet of actively eroding stream as well as provide opportunities to enhance forested riparian buffer in Broad Creek Park. $364,225.
Ulmstead Club, Inc.: for implementation of the three rain gardens along a parking area fronting the Magothy River at Ulmstead Point. $18,900.

Environmental Education Mini Grant Program

May 2020

Anacostia Watershed Society: to engage 250 DC students to participate in a shad restoration program. $5,000.
Anacostia Watershed Society: for 125 4th graders from Prince George’s County Public Schools to participate in Anacostia Watershed Society’s Rice Ranger Program. $5,000.
Annapolis Elementary School PTA: for 30 K-3rd graders students to participate in field experiences at Nature Park at Back Creek and to conduct a self-selected action project to take place at their local park. $4,315.
Anne Arundel County Public Schools: for 20 teachers to participate in a summer training program facilitated by Anne Arundel County Public Schools Office of Environmental Literacy and the Chesapeake Bay Foundation. $5,000.
Baltimore City College: for 49 11th and 12th graders to participate in a NorthBay field experience investigating biodiversity and stream health at Herring Run park. $1,700.
Baltimore Lab School: for 131 1st-12th graders to participate in field experiences with NorthBay and the Chesapeake Bay Foundation in support of their Watershed Stewards of the Chesapeake Bay program. $5,000.
Belvedere Elementary School: for a project for students to explore how food choices impact the Chesapeake Bay watershed. $4,880.
Capital City Public Charter School: for 10th and 11th grade Environmental Science students to participate in oyster farm research projects and conduct water quality testing on the Potomac River. $5,000.
Catonsville Middle School: for 268 6th graders to investigate natural resources and wildlife population at Camp Puh’tok and how to improve biodiversity in the schoolyard. $5,000.
Church Hill Elementary School: for 54 4th graders to identify areas in and around the school yard that could be improved, such as erosion control, bird box replacements, cafeteria waste, and native plant plantings. $750.
County of Blair on behalf of the Fort Roberdeau Association: for students to remove growth of privet from a woodlot adjacent to a Revolutionary War era fort and prepare a series of STEAM based classroom learning experiences. $3,679.
Cross Country Elementary School: for 65 6th graders to participate in a field trip with NorthBay and complete an action project on campus. $5,000.
Dance Exchange: for the delivery of an Arts Integrated Approach professional development training for 30 Prince George’s County Public School teachers. $4,955.
Eastern PA Coalition for Abandoned Mine Reclamation: to engage 4th graders to become active environmental stewards by helping to actively reduce AMD pollution in their waters. $5,000.
Grasonville Elementary School:  for an outdoor field experience for 71 4th graders at Chesapeake Bay Environmental Center
and raise oyster spat. $2,589.
The Green School of Baltimore: for 132 1st-5th graders to participate in a field experience and complete an action project at their school. $1,350.
Hamilton Elementary Middle School #236: for 110 7th graders to participate in a NorthBay Educational Experience and plant a rain garden on campus. $3,488.
Hanover-Caroline Soil and Water Conservation District: to provide a Meaningful Watershed Educational Experience Field Day for sixth graders at the five public middle schools of Hanover and Caroline Counties. $4,139.
Hanover-Caroline Soil and Water Conservation District: for a professional development training program to prepare teachers to carry out the Waste and Recycling, Environmental Quality, and Water Investigations. $2,536.
H-B Woodlawn Secondary Program: for a micro-plastic mosaics: using art to advocate for recycled materials $988.
Henrico Education Foundation: for professional development training for elementary science teachers in Henrico County Public Schools. $5,000.
Hillcrest Elementary School (P.T.A.): for 125 3rd graders to participate in stream health and water quality educational experiences at Patapsco Valley State Park. $500.
James River Association: for a boat trip and wildlife data collection by 5th graders. $5,000.
James River Association: for watershed health investigation and a stormwater project by 5th graders. $5,000.
Kent School: for 59 4th graders to participate in several field experiences and complete an action project at their school. $2,500.
Lacawac Sanctuary: for an Advanced Water Ecology program including classroom visits and a field experience providing in-depth water quality investigation. $4,900.
Latin American Montessori Bilingual Public Charter School (LAMB): to support curriculum covering environmental stewardship, watershed issues, sustainability, and the role humans play in impacting the environment. $1,570.
Living Classrooms Foundation of the National Capital Region: to provide 3rd-5th graders a deeper opportunity to investigate environmental issues affecting Kingman Island. $1,969
Living Classrooms Foundation of the National Capital Region:  for 5th graders to investigate human impact on D.C. waterways, as well as the larger Chesapeake Bay watershed. $2,847.
Maryland National Capital Park and Planning Commission: for 60 10th-12th graders from Prince George’s County Public Schools to participate in the Chesapeake Bay Landscape Professional-Associate training and plant a conservation landscape in their community. $5,000.
Maymont Foundation: for project-based learning professional development for Chesterfield teachers. $4,820.
National Center for Children and Families: for 20 youth from Greentree Shelter to participate in a field experience at Sandy Point State Park and install rain barrels. $1,931.
NatureBridge: to engage 40 students from KIPP DC Honor Academy in an intensive watershed awareness field experience. $5,000.
One Montgomery Green: for 50 8th-12th graders at Northwood and Blair High Schools to participate in the Clean Headwaters program on the impact of plastic waste. $5,000.
Payne Elementary School PTSA: to educate over 300 students from a Title 1 elementary school in Washington DC about the health of the Anacostia River. $4,983.
Prince George’s County Public Schools, Williams S. Schmidt Outdoor Education Center: for 30 high schoolers who receive special education services to attend Teen Adventure Camp with Schmidt Center. $3,125.
Saint Ignatius Loyola Academy: for 30 7th graders to participate in an Oyster Recovery Project with Living Classrooms Foundation. $2,525.
Severna Park Elementary School: for the installation of an outdoor classroom. $5,000.
Southeast Community Development Corporation: for 15 students from Tench Tilghman Elementary/Middle School to explore the impact of solid waste disposal on the health of the Chesapeake Bay and the greater environment. $4,550.
St. Martin of Tours: for 16 3rd graders to participate in an outdoor experience at Chesapeake Bay Environmental Center and participate in a school-wide action project. $614.
Stemmers Run Middle School: for 225 6th graders to participate in an outdoor field experience and complete an action project on campus. $5,000.
Sudlersville Middle School: for 118 6th graders to participate in a field experience with NorthBay and complete an action project on the school campus. $5,000.
Wilderness Leadership & Learning, Inc. (WILL): for 36 9th-11th graders to participate in a field experience at the Chesapeake Bay Foundation to learn about sediment, nutrients, and toxins, climate change and erosion, the important filtration and habitat benefits of the marsh. $5,000.
Wind Dance Farm & Earth Education Center: to develop water monitoring skills, explore rivers by canoe, and develop habitats for bird and insect species, install rain barrels, and enhance the riparian zone of Iden Run. $5,000.
Wisdom Projects, Inc.: for 60 K-8th graders to participate in Baltimore City’s White Oak Nature summer camp to attend field trips. $5,000.
YMCA of the Chesapeake: for 20 middle school students to participate in the YMCA Take the Helm after school program and complete a project focused on submerged aquatic vegetation. $4,995.

Outdoor Learning Network

May 2020

Cacapon Institute: to support the continuation and sustainability of the Outdoor Learning Network Initiative work in the Eastern Panhandle of West Virginia. $40,000.
Conestoga Valley School District: to provide environmental literacy professional development to south central Pennsylvania. $40,000.

Pooled Monitoring Initiative’s Restoration Research Award Program

May 2020

Tetra Tech, Inc.: to research the vertebrate community response to stream restoration efforts that will inform future management decisions. $189,248.
University of Louisville Research Foundation, Inc.: to research the use of two-dimensional hydrodynamic models in assessing and predicting stream restoration outcomes to better design these practices in the future. $299,534.
Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University: for research effort to determine the watershed effects on success of stream restoration for excess nitrogen reduction. $213,857.

Anne Arundel County Community Planting Mini Grant Program

February 2020

Hillsmere Shores Improvement Association: for the implementation of 65+ native trees and shrubs in the community. $2,500.

Community Engagement Mini-Grant Program

February 2020

Chesapeake Education Arts Research Society: for six hands-on, educational workshops regarding vegetable and native tree sapling gardening and seed saving. $4,873.
Cottage City: for a community clean-up and information session on the impacts of trash and litter pollution. $500.
No One Left Unhelped, Inc.: for a series of clean-ups, storm drain stenciling events, and environmentally focused educational workshops. $5,000.
ShoreRivers: for the production and distribution of the State of the Rivers Report Card and for five events related to the state of the rivers. $5,000.

Environmental Education

February 2020

Accokeek Foundation: for the development of a Countywide 1st grade program “Tiny Seed, Global Impact.” $31,717.
Annapolis Maritime Museum & Park: for the expansion of professional development and the Countywide 2nd grade environmental program “Chesapeake Champions.” $25,839.
Camp Puh’Tok for Boys and Girls, Inc.: for the enhancement of a countywide 6th grade “Ecosystem Investigation” program. $40,000.
Eastern Shore Land Conservancy’s Sassafras Environmental Education Center: for the enhancement of Countywide 4th, 5th, and 9th grade Agro-Ecology programs. $23,977.
Maryland Association for Environmental and Outdoor Education: for professional development trainings to Maryland educators incorporating student-led action projects. $39,999.
Montgomery County Public Schools: for 10th grade teacher professional development “Citizen Science: Chemistry of Nitrogen Cycling.” $70,000.
REAL School Gardens (dba Teach Out): to design and pilot a new, Environmental Science-focused Professional Learning Community for teachers from five Prince George’s County elementary schools. $36,000.
ShoreRivers: for the development of an Eastern Shore Meaningful Watershed Educational Experience Academy for teachers. $39,857.
YMCA of the Chesapeake: for countywide expansion of an Environmental Literacy for 6th graders. $39,906.

Montgomery County Watershed Restoration and Outreach

February 2020

Anacostia Riverkeeper: to reduce trash in the Anacostia River watershed through the design, fabrication and installation of one Bandalong Litter Trap in the Lockridge Drive Tributary. $250,000.
Audubon Naturalist Society of the Central Atlantic States, Inc.: to implement a Stormwater Pavers project for the Audubon Naturalist Shop parking lot. $68,125.
Bannockburn Community Club: to implement conservation landscaping, dry wells and rain gardens. $48,596.
Christ the Servant Lutheran Church: for the replacement of 4,000 sq. ft. of impervious blacktop with permeable pavers at Christ the Servant Lutheran Church. $119,200.
Friends of Cabin John Creek (and) Watershed: for community‐based public engagement, watershed stewardship, and stormwater management installations including residential rain planters. $64,191.
Interfaith Partners for the Chesapeake: to design and deliver a Green Team Leadership Development Program training, developing successful green teams at 3-5 places of worship. $8,944.
National Wildlife Federation: to expand the understanding and practices of stormwater management through residential lawn replacement with native plants to reduce stormwater and create wildlife habitat. $50,000.
Rock Creek Conservancy: to expand Rock Creek Conservancy’s existing Stream Team Leader program by recruiting and training 20 Leaders to lead litter cleanups for about 450 community members. $21,444.

Prince George’s County Stormwater Stewardship

February 2020

Alice Ferguson Foundation: for two stormwater retrofit practices within the barnyard area of the Hard Bargain Farm Environmental Center. $140,000.
Anacostia Watershed Society: to support a Watershed Stewards Academy and Maryland Master Naturalist program that trains 60 watershed residents. $11,510.
Anacostia Watershed Society: to improve habitat and water quality along the Anacostia River using mussels, floating wetlands, and trees. $23,453.
Central Kenilworth Avenue Revitalization Community Development Corporation, Inc.: to plant 300 trees in the Greater Riverdale/Bladensburg neighborhoods. $134,031.
City of Hyattsville: to promote the importance and benefits of trees by implementing a Tree Canopy study and providing resources to residents to plant trees. $60,762.
City of Mount Rainier: to develop 11 green infrastructure practices to reduce stormwater runoff impacts and support making the City of Mount Rainier a model “green city.” $196,000.
EcoLatinos, Inc.: for an outreach campaign to increase awareness of stormwater runoff and its impact on water quality among Spanish-speaking residents. $18,993.
EcoLatinos, Inc.: in support of the “Festival del Rio Anacostia 2020,” where more than 800 attendees can participate in environmental related activities. $23,694.
End Time Harvest Ministries: to engage residents in a clean water initiative educating surrounding neighborhoods on stormwater problems and possible solutions. $31,163.
Global Health and Education Projects, Inc.: to plant 200 trees through the Family Tree Adoption Program in high-priority areas of Prince George’s County that have low tree canopy. $115,969.
GreenTrust Alliance, Inc.: to add 5.5 acres of forested and warm season grass/ pollinator-focused headwater buffer to an existing stream and wetland restoration project at the USDA Beltsville Agricultural Research Center. $50,000.
Town of Cheverly: to design and implement a rain garden in the Cheverly Town Park. $54,954.
Town of Edmonston: to implement the fourth industrial “green street” located in the district of Lafayette Place. $68,527.
University of Maryland College Park: to develop a water quality action framework and outreach campaign for homeowner/community association boards, property managers, and residents. $50,000.

Sponsorship

February 2020

City of Annapolis: for an architectural visualization plan to address sea level rise and resiliency at City Dock. $3,000.

Anne Arundel County Community Planting Mini Grant Program

November 2019

Tidewater Colony Open Space Association: for the removal of invasive plants and planting of native trees in the Tidewater Colony community in Annapolis. $2,500.
Whitehurst Residents Club Association, Inc.: for the removal of invasive species in the Whitehurst community in preparation for native planting. $500.

Community Engagement Mini-Grant Program

November 2019

Asbury Foundation: for the installation of conservation landscaping and two educational workshops regarding stormwater issues and solutions. $5,000.
Edgewater Beach Citizens Association, Inc.: for the removal of invasive species using goats and community engagement. $5,000.
Plastic Free QAC, Inc.: for a series of informational events regarding the effects of plastic pollution on waterways and reusable bags as a better alternative to plastic bags. $4,420.

Watershed Assistance Grant Program

November 2019

Arundel Rivers Federation: for design and permitting of the Quiet Waters Park Caffrey’s Run stream restoration project. $102,807.
Baltimore County Soil Conservation District: for design and permit submission of the Western Run and Deadman Run stream restoration project. $161,600.
Cecil County, Maryland: for design of a stream restoration and sand filter project at Cecil County Public Schools Administrative Services Center and design of a tree planting at Bayview Elementary School. $183,890.
Chesapeake Rivers Association: for design of the Anne Arundel SPCA ecological restoration project, including stream restoration, wetland, marsh, and living shoreline components. $120,000.
City Neighbors Foundation: for the design of stormwater management practices at City Neighbors Charter School. $38,850.
The Community Ecology Institute: for the development of an ecological master plan and design of stormwater management practices at the Community Ecology Institute’s farm. $65,000.
Eden Korean United Methodist Church: for design of stormwater management practices on the church’s grounds, including a bioretention, rain gardens, a rainwater harvesting system, and an infiltration berm. $22,203.
Harford Soil Conservation District: for design and permitting of the stream restoration and riparian buffer components of the Broad Creek headwater restoration project. $110,000.
Prince George’s County, Maryland: for design and permitting of the Carey Branch headwater restoration project. $75,000.
ShoreRivers: for the development of the Wye Mills Action Plan to identify prioritized stormwater management and green infrastructure opportunities within the Wye Mills Community. $30,818.
ShoreRivers: for design and permitting of a stream restoration project at Foster Farm in Church Hill, Maryland. $44,927.
ShoreRivers: for design and permitting of a stream restoration project at Hickman Farm in Kent County, Maryland. $95,000.
Southeast Community Development Corporation: for the design of stormwater management practices at Tench Tilghman Elementary/Middle School. $29,163.

Outreach and Restoration Grant Program

November 2019

Gunpowder Valley Conservancy: for the removal of asphalt, the installation of two micro-bioretention practices, the installation of an outdoor teaching area, and educational workshops. $75,000.
ShoreRivers: for a two-year program to engage and activate faith organizations of any denomination in environmental education to their congregations, and ultimately environmental stewardship action. $74,958.
Alliance for the Chesapeake Bay: to educate local Harford County residents, community groups and faith-based groups about the importance of trees and forested landscapes for water quality and quality of life. $74,901.
City Neighbors Foundation: for the implementation of four stormwater Best Management Practices, the removal of impervious surface, and the development of associated environmental education curricula. $74,741.
The Church of the Redeemer: for the removal of an asphalt parking lot to be replaced with bioretention, pervious paving, and native plants, trees, and shrubs. $74,043.
Lower Shore Land Trust
: to develop an invasive species management model program within Wicomico County that will be transferrable to other counties building a framework for mapping invasive species on County property and extending outreach to landowners and community groups. $72,069.
Urban Ecosystem Restoration, Inc.: to convert approximately 3,838 square feet of turf to conservation landscaping in the Lakelands HOA and provide multiple modes of educational outreach to 465 members of the Gaithersburg community. $66,629.
Baltimore Tree Trust: for the Fells Point Gateway Tree Project to plant a “gateway” of trees along Eastern Avenue and Fleet Street in Baltimore to create a green corridor running parallel to Patterson Park and the waterfront. $66,331.
Howard EcoWorks: for planting trees and shrubs and associated educational events to encourage homeowners to convert turf grass to more functional systems. $50,856.
Port Tobacco River Conservancy: for the construction of an outdoor classroom shelter and the enhancement of stormwater control best management practices. $51,000.
Gunpowder Valley Conservancy: to conduct formative social marketing research for motivating businesses to install rain gardens and microbioretention practices on their properties. $50,000.
The Ocean Foundation: expand our successfully pilot tested social marketing campaign in Chesapeake Bay tributaries throughout Maryland to improve recreational boating practices in the presence of submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV). $49,979.
Canton Canopy: for creating tree pits, planting trees, and maintaining trees in the sidewalks along Fait and Linwood Avenues, as well as community volunteer events in Baltimore City’s Canton neighborhood. $38,900.
Institute for Local Self-Reliance: for support of the Baltimore Neighborhood Soil Rebuilders Composter Training Program. $30,000.
Civic Works, Inc.: for support of a certification-based stormwater management training for 10 Baltimore City residents from historically marginalized communities. $30,000.
Patterson Park Audubon Center: for support of the Audubon’s Avian Ambassadors for Baltimore, Birds, and the Bay program. $30,000.
University System of Maryland Foundation- The Environmental Finance Center: for support of the Stormwater Management Residential Action Framework and Outreach project. $30,000.
Gunpowder Riverkeeper: for a countywide outreach campaign to curb stormwater pollution using online/print communications, social media, and events. $30,000.
Friends of Patapsco Valley Heritage Greenway, Inc.: to conduct at least 10 stream cleanups, 4 invasive plant removals, 2 native shrub and tree plantings, and storm drain labeling to reduce the amount of pollution and increase the native tree canopy in Elkridge. $29,998.
Waterfront Partnership of Baltimore, Inc.: for support of the revival of the Harris Creek Connected group to utilize their collective actions to inspire a cultural shift of environmentalism as it relates to cleaner water and neighborhoods in Baltimore City. $29,995.
Interfaith Partners for the Chesapeake: to assist in restoring BMP projects as well as educate 6 to 8 congregations to maintain these BMPs. $29,943.
Interfaith Partners for the Chesapeake: to facilitate restoration projects at congregations in Salisbury through a multi-session workshop.  The course will foster greater understanding of local water-quality challenges. IPC will work with Lower Shore Land Trust on restoration projects. $28,347.
Anacostia Riverkeeper: for a microplastic monitoring and outreach program in the Anacostia watershed. $27,819.
Howard County Conservancy: The Howard County Conservancy will work with county partners to reduce pesticide use, encourage planting of native plants and become a certified Bee City. $27,816.
Nanticoke Watershed Alliance: for an outreach campaign with poultry farmers about alternatives to mowed grass for improved stormwater management. $26,695.
Alice Ferguson Foundation: to provide training for Charles County residents and organizations to monitor and provide detailed data on the waste entering the Charles County waterways. $22,784.
Lower Shore Land Trust: for support of the project “Engaging Faith-Based Communities in Stewardship and Restoration” for rain barrels, cisterns, native garden, and educational workshop supplies at St. Alban’s Episcopal Church of Salisbury. $20,207.
United Workers Association (United Workers): The core of this program will be developing and disseminating a citywide Zero Waste Plan in collaboration with Baltimore Office of Sustainability and Zero Waste Associates. $20,000.
Clean Water Fund: for support for the Testing Methods for Communicating Best Practices for Living on Septic project. $19,927.
Interfaith Partners for the Chesapeake: to train congregations within the City of Gaithersburg to educate 60-100 people about watershed restoration. $15,038.
Wicomico Environmental Trust: for a water quality testing program that engages the citizens, is led by trained scientists, and supports the City of Salisbury and Wicomico County watershed restoration goals. $15,000.
Columbia Association: for invasive species removal, native perennial plantings, 300 tree planting, and to install 500 live stakes along eroded stream banks. $15,000.
Interfaith Partners for the Chesapeake: for a leadership development program to increase the impact of the faith community on Chesapeake Bay Watershed improvements. $14,466.
Nanjemoy-Potomac Environmental Coalition, Inc.: school students will design a reusable bag to distribute throughout the community at grocery stores and community events and present their reusable bag program to government and non-governmental representatives. $13,510.
Department of Natural Resources: for native trees and shrubs planting, workshops, and signage at a publicly accessible location at Bloomfield Farm. $9,499.
Interfaith Partners for the Chesapeake: for support of the Green Team Leadership Development Program, educating 100 people about watershed restoration in Baltimore City. $9,298.
Wicomico Public Library: to create a StoryWalk along the Riverwalk in Salisbury to increase childhood physical and ecological literacy. $7,853.
Baltimore Community ToolBank: for the education of business owners and property managers in Baltimore City on sustainable stormwater practices. $4,500.
Stone Gate Town House Community Association: for workshops covering stormwater management and bay-wise Gardening in the Association. $4,255.

Anne Arundel County Community Planting Mini Grant Program

September 2019

Annapolis Landing Homeowners Association: for native tree planting, invasive species removal, and increased tree canopy. $2,500.
Arundel Rivers Federation: for planting in West Shoreham community to aide runoff and water filtration. $1,465.
Magothy Meadows Homeowners Association: for removal of invasive species diseased trees and native tree planting. $2,500.
Olde Severna Park Improvement Association, Inc.: for spraying of invasive phragmites on community property. $800.

Community Engagement Mini-Grant Program

September 2019

Chestertown Garden Club: for a native pollinator garden and tree planting with community volunteers. $2,793.
Cross Keys Condominium #1: for Baltimore City waterways workshops and the value of native pollinator plants and engagement of volunteers in a conservation landscaping project. $4,908.
Riva Trace Council: for the installation of a native plant pollinator garden and education regarding the value and function of native plants and treating stormwater runoff. $4,910.
Town of Emmitsburg: for the distribution of 117 rain barrels and two educational workshops regarding the challenges and solutions associated with stormwater runoff. $5,000.
Town of New Market: for a rain barrel education workshop and distribution of 40 rain barrels to workshop participants. $2,400.
Volunteering Untapped Incorporated: for a community clean-up in Druid Hill Park and the Druid Heights neighborhood. $4,700.

Capacity Building Initiatives

September 2019

Alliance for the Chesapeake Bay: for the enhancement of communications systems in place and increasing management capacity. $15,778.
Annapolis Maritime Museum & Park: for technical capacity building to support upgrades at the Eastport and Back Creek campuses. $11,307.
Anne Arundel Watershed Stewards Academy: for consultant support to devise a strategic plan. $17,490.
EcoLatinos, Inc.: for the enhancement of adaptive and technical capacities to support diversity, equity and inclusion work. $12,000.
Gunpowder Valley Conservancy: to increase leadership capacity and develop a financial plan to diversity revenue sources. $15,293.
Harford Land Trust, Inc.: for developing communications and database upgrades to support the technical capacity. $17,180.
Havre de Grace Maritime Museum: for the Chesapeake Bay Watershed Alliance to create an adaptive development plan. $13,000.
Middle Susquehanna Riverkeeper Association, Inc.: for work with a development consultant to create a sustainable and robust plan. $16,500.
National Wildlife Federation: for technical and leadership support for the Young Professionals of Color program through the Choose Clean Water Coalition. $29,960.
Northern Virginia Conservation Trust: for technical capacity support to upgrade multiple systems for donor relations and employee use. $14,541.
Potomac Conservancy: for diversity, equity, and inclusion capacity building through a local consultant. $25,000.
Rock Creek Conservancy: for technical capacity enhancements relating to volunteer outreach and engagement of a broader audience. $7,750.
West Virginia Rivers Coalition: for capacity building support to increase revenue and leadership capacities. $15,000.

Environmental Education Mini Grant Program

September 2019

Anacostia Watershed Society: to remove invasive plants and plant native wildflowers to restore 1 acre of meadow habitat along the river. $5,000.
Baltimore Polytechnic Institute: “Canoe and scoop” water quality field experience. $2,500.
Baltimore Urban Debate League: for native plant and tree installment and pollution outreach for 8th graders in 2 schools. $5,000.
Bethesda Green: for student participation in the Bethesda Green Environmental Leaders Program. $5,000.
Broadway High School: for investigation of water quality and user issues by doing a bottom grab invertebrate investigation and a qualitative measurement study. $290.
Catonsville Elementary School: for field trips on the Patapsco River. $2,375.
Cecil County Public Schools: for a Cecil Manor Elementary School outdoor experience at North Bay. $5,000.
Diakon Child, Family & Community Ministries: for field trips including the Kings Gap Environmental Education Center, Wildwood Park Nature Center, the Susquehanna River and the PA State Legislature. $3,260.
Dunloggin Middle School: to establish a better riparian buffer with tree plantings. $4,020.
Eastern Shore Land Conservancy’s Sassafras Environmental Education Center: for elementary grades to participate in stream cleanups and create artwork. $4,537
Easton High School: for AP Environmental Science students to research and implement capstone projects with industry mentors. $3,700.
Edward M. Felegy Elementary School: for a comprehensive program engaging students about meadow restoration along the Anacostia Watershed. $2,653.
Elk Neck Elementary School: for an outdoor experience at North Bay. $4,154.
Friends of Deckers Creek: to hold a four-part education event for the Mountaineer Boys and Girls Club and kayaking field trip. $4,921.
Green Muslims: for the “Our Deen (Faith) is Green” youth outdoor education program, taking place at Hard Bargain Farm in Accokink, MD, and Whitehall Farm in Clifton, VA. $5,000.
The GreenMount School: for garden and wildlife habitat study with trash clean-up in area stream buffers and streets. $5,000.
Henrico Education Foundation: to provide field trips with the James River Association for 150 students. $5,000.
Immaculate Conception School: for watershed research and field experience with Prigel Family Creamery and Conowingo Dam. $5,000.
James River Association: for participants of the Tuckahoe YMCA and Quioccasin Middle School’s STAR program to explore and understand their local watershed through field trips. $5,000.
James River Association: Elizabeth Redd Elementary School’s 5th grade will participate in an in-class lesson, field trip to Presquile National Wildlife Refuge, and a Paint Out Pollution stewardship project. $5,000.
Kent Island High School: for implementation of an outdoor classroom. $5,000.
Key School: for the creation of an environmental sculpture on plastic pollution. $5,000.
Lacey Spring Elementary School: for professional development training for up to 25 teachers about the Chesapeake Bay and restoration. $3,750.
Live It Learn It: for Audubon Naturalist Society field trips by right 5th grade classes with a garbology-focused action project. $5,000.
Loch Raven Technical Academy: 6th grade biosystems field investigation at Camp Puh Tok. $5,000.
MacArthur Middle School: for 330 8th graders to visit Jug Bay Wetlands Sanctuary and install a rain garden. $2,250.
Mary Moss @ J. Albert Adams: for construction of a green house, grow native plants, and expand a rain garden on campus. $4,750.
Maryland Association for Environmental and Outdoor Education: to develop teacher training program for Project Learning Tree. $5,000.
Montpelier Elementary School: for student participation in a field experience at Patuxent Research Refuge and install a rain garden on their school grounds. $3,975.
Mountainside Education and Enrichment, Inc.:  for stormwater mitigation education activities for Friends Meeting School. $3,530.
One Montgomery Green: for student participation in the Clean Headwaters Program. $5,000.
Park School of Baltimore: for students to study poultry farming and soil ecology. $4,996.
Park School of Baltimore: for student study of plankton, false-dark mussel filtration rate and efficiency and comparison to oysters in varying Inner Harbor conditions. $4,968.
Rivanna Conservation Alliance: for 200 students to investigate local water pollution issues, monitor water quality, and implement an action project. $4,985.
Skyline High School: for water quality field trips and monitoring by 150 9th-12th graders. $5,000.
Spring Grove Area School District: for a wetland and watershed field trip by 8th grade science students. $2,864.
The Summit School: for sixth through eighth grade students to participate in a Roedown Farm field experience. $4,240.
University of Mary Washington: for professional development training of 20 4th-6th grade teachers on watershed curriculum development and integrating science and literacy. $5,000.
Viers Mills Elementary School: 4th grade field experience and action project on school grounds. $5,000.
Village School: to take student pollinator gardens from concept to fruition, by designing, and installing pollinator gardens for the dual purpose of improving water quality and providing a diverse habitat. $1,178.
Wicomico County Board of Education / Public Schools: for 130 middle schools to engage in outdoor experiences leading to on-campus projects. $2,085.

Green Streets, Green Jobs, Green Towns Program

September 2019

Lancaster Farmland Trust: to catalyze the adoption of farm conservation practices, document the current state of conservation plans on farms, and assess any barriers to the implementation of those plans. $100,000.

EPA Conowingo

September 2019

University of Maryland College Park: for the establishment of a Watershed Implementation Plan innovative financing system. $309,814.

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