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Chesapeake Conservation Corps Profile: Jesus Munoz Buenrostro & Southeast Community Development Corporation

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This year we’re showcasing the unique experience of participating in the Chesapeake Conservation Corps by sharing profiles of each member of the 2018-2019 cohort along with information on their host site and descriptions of the work they’ll be doing. Corps members met their host site mentors and began their year of service in August 2018.

Jesus Munoz Buenrostro grew up in Baltimore and is currently a senior at the University of Baltimore, studying Environmental Sustainability and Human Ecology.

Last year, he served as a Legislative and Community Engagement intern with the Baltimore City Council, where he was able to advocate and gather support in Southeast Baltimore for the polystyrene ban. Most recently, he gained experience in the conservation field working for the National Aquarium as an Urban Conservation and Education intern, where he worked on restoration projects, invasive species management, and community outreach events with the National Aquarium, U.S Fish and Wildlife Services, and the Living Classrooms Foundation.

As a Chesapeake Conservation Corps member, Jesus is working with the Southeast Community Development Corporation (Southeast CDC), a nonprofit, community-based organization dedicated to growing and supporting a thriving socioeconomically and racially diverse Southeast Baltimore where residents share in the success and improvement of their communities.

Southeast CDC operates a number of community revitalization programs in the Highlandtown area of Baltimore, including partnering with a wide variety of environmental organizations, such as Blue Water Baltimore, the Parks and People Foundation, and the Chesapeake Bay Trust to reduce storm water runoff and increase the tree canopy in southeast Baltimore, offering Jesus the chance to work on community engagement events, environmental education, and conservation projects during his year of service.

Now Open! Prince George’s County Litter Reduction and Citizen Engagement Mini Grant Program

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Get the resources you need to make your community cleaner and greener through the Prince George’s County Litter Reduction and Citizen Engagement Mini Grant Program.

According to the Prince George’s County Litter Reduction Campaign, “litter costs [the] County millions of dollars a year, decreases property values, has a negative impact on health and wellness, and threatens wildlife, reservoirs and waterways.” Therefore, “reducing litter is critical to improving the economic, environmental, and social health of [the] County.”

To support and engage County residents in the fight against litter, the Prince George’s County Government and the Chesapeake Bay Trust announce the Prince George’s County Litter Reduction and Citizen Engagement Mini Grant Program.  This program supports community-driven litter reduction and litter-related citizen engagement projects that engage and educate residents, students, and businesses about ways to make their communities cleaner and greener. Communities may request funding for community cleanups, “Adopt-a-Stream” cleanups, storm drain stenciling projects, and more through this program.

Join the fight against litter for a #LitterFreePGC! Contact Nguyen Le at (410) 974-2941 x110 or nle@cbtrust.org if you have questions or to discuss project ideas.

Community-based organizations (homeowner associations, civic associations, and nonprofits) and small municipalities are encouraged to apply. Faith-based organizations interested in participating are encouraged to be a partner for a community group nearby that will serve as the lead on the project. If you are a resident interested in participating, we encourage you to reach out to your community organization and share this opportunity.

Applications for this program will be accepted on an on-going basis until funds for this fiscal year are exhausted. 

Trust Unveils Newly Designed Chesapeake Bay License Plate

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Marylanders can help restore natural resources and give back to their communities by requesting the newly redesigned Bay Plate

The Chesapeake Bay Trust and the Maryland Department of Transportation Motor Vehicle Administration (MDOT MVA) gathered with partners and friends to reveal the new design for Maryland’s Chesapeake Bay license plate during a special unveiling ceremony at Sandy Point State Park in Annapolis. The newly redesigned plate features two prominent Chesapeake icons: the blue crab and the Chesapeake Bay Bridge.

Sales of the Chesapeake Bay license plate support the Trust’s grant programs, which fund K-12 outdoor education, environmental restoration projects, and community engagement in natural resources. The new plate will be available for purchase beginning Monday, October 29, 2018.

The unveiling of the new plate, frequently referred to as the Bay Plate or Chesapeake Bay Plate, is the culmination of an extensive process that engaged multiple Maryland-based artists and incorporated input from thousands of Marylanders who considered over 250 alternative designs. Ultimately, TM Design, a Frederick-based design firm and member of the Maryland State Disadvantaged Business Enterprise (DBE) Program, created a design that won the majority of survey respondents’ votes and resonated with Marylanders’ desire for a plate that evokes “Chesapeake Pride.”

“The Maryland Department of Transportation is proud to partner with the Chesapeake Bay Trust and support its efforts to restore and protect the Chesapeake Bay through the Bay Plate,” said Transportation Secretary Pete K. Rahn.

The Bay Plate is a popular choice among Maryland drivers, with 7 percent of all vehicles displaying them and 12 percent of households across the state reporting that they have at least one set of Bay Plates in the family. Close to 338,000 Bay Plates are on the roads today.

“MDOT MVA is pleased to offer this new option to Maryland drivers,” said MDOT MVA Administrator Chrissy Nizer, whose agency administers the Bay Plate program.

Scenes from the Unveiling: Maryland Secretary of Transporation Pete K. Rahn; Maryland MVA Administrator Chrissy Nizer;  Trust Executive Director Jana Davis; new Bay Plate designer  Tina Cardosi of  TM Design, Inc.; and 2018 Trust scholarship winner Darrea Frazier addressed guests at the unveiling ceremony.

“We look forward to providing premier customer service to all those interested in purchasing the new Bay Plate at one of our branches or through our convenient web services starting on Monday, October 29th.”

The new design is the third design in the history of the Bay Plate, with the first introduced in 1990 and the second in 2004. All Maryland license plates are manufactured by Maryland Correctional Enterprises, a division of the Department of Public Safety and Correctional Services.

Bay Plate Designers: Designers of the new Bay Plate, Tina Cardosi (center) and Sujen Buford (right) with designer of the 2004 plate, Joe Barsin.

“We are so proud to have worked on the new Bay Plate,” said Tina Cardosi, president of TM Design. “It will be an honor and a thrill to see our work on so many vehicles on Maryland’s roads and beyond. Knowing that this plate will help to improve water quality and our natural resources throughout the state is incredibly rewarding.”

Through Chesapeake Bay Plate funds, the Trust provides approximately 400 grants per year to schools, faith-based organizations, civic associations, homeowners associations, watershed groups, environmental organizations, and more. Each year, about 80,000 students and 20,000 volunteers are engaged through the Bay Plate and Trust grants. These grantees plant thousands of trees, native plants, marsh grasses, and oysters; remove tons of trash; and create over 100 acres of wetlands, rain gardens, stream buffers, and living shorelines each year.

“We are thrilled to introduce this iconic Chesapeake Bay Plate that captures the essence of where we live,” said Jana Davis, PhD, Executive Director of the Chesapeake Bay Trust. “By asking for the Bay Plate, drivers help to get kids outside on field trips and trees and gardens planted across our communities, all of which helps the Bay and its contributing rivers and streams.”

Maryland has made significant progress in restoring the Chesapeake Bay in recent years. Under the Hogan Administration, the state has invested a historic $4 billion in Bay restoration initiatives. The Chesapeake Bay recently received its highest recorded grade in the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Sciences annual report card, and Maryland’s coastal bays hit a historic high mark in the 2017 Coastal Bays Report Card from the Maryland Coastal Bays Program.

The newly designed license plate will be available for $20, and can be purchased through an MDOT MVA branch, car dealerships, tag and title agencies, and online at https://cbtrust.org/purchase-a-bay-plate/.

Outdoor Enthusiasts Have Yet Another Way to Give Back

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Photo: Maryland DNR/Larry Hindman

Partnership with Maryland Department of Natural Resources Establishes Maryland Outdoor Recreation and Clean Water Fund

Anglers, boaters and hunters who purchase their licenses or registrations from the Maryland Department of Natural Resources have a new way to contribute to give back to natural resources they enjoy and love. In partnership with the Trust, the department announced a new voluntary option in the online checkout for the Maryland Outdoor Recreation and Clean Water Fund.

Funds generated by the new program will be distributed as grants for on-the-ground conservation and restoration projects that seek to enhance habitat and water quality as well as programs aimed at getting K-12 students outdoors. Grants will be provided to nonprofits in support of environmental and natural resources priorities throughout the state, from the Youghiogheny to the Coastal Bays.

“Our citizens and customers shared our commitment and passion for the great outdoors, and are great advocates and stewards in the conservation, protection and wise use of our state’s lands and waters,” Maryland Natural Resources Secretary Mark Belton said. “Thanks to our strong partnership with the Chesapeake Bay Trust, we can provide our customers with an easy and simple way to give back to nature’s bounty.”

Grants from the Maryland Outdoor Recreation and Clean Water Fund will support projects as small as $100 to over $500,000 made to community and environmental organizations as well as research and watershed groups.

“We are thrilled to make stronger connections between the fishing, hunting and boating communities, and improvement of the resources they enjoy,” Chesapeake Bay Trust Executive Director Jana Davis said. “The evidence is mounting that being outdoors is good for all of us: We want these communities to have an option not just to enjoy their outdoor activities, but the opportunity to take part in restoring and protecting outdoor resources.”

All contributions will be tax deductible. Contributors over $10 will have the option of enrolling in a “Perks Program,” which offers discounts and preferred parking at local businesses throughout Maryland.

Examples of projects supported by the Maryland Outdoor Recreation and Clean Water Fund include:

  • Boating field trips
  • Eel, oyster, shad, terrapin, trout and other raise-and-release programs for students
  • Living shoreline projects, including access for canoes and kayaks
  • Local sustainable seafood projects
  • Research to improve efficacy of stream restoration practices
  • Trout stream restoration projects
  • Wetland restoration projects

For every $20 contributed, one tree can be planted and one student can receive an outdoor field trip.

Funds will be managed by the Maryland Department of Natural Resources and the Trust.

Learn more about this program at www.cbtrust.org/mdoutdoors.

Welcome Chesapeake Conservation Corps Class of 2019! And congrats to the Class of 2018!

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Maryland's future is bright green.

Maryland Environment Secretary Ben GrumblesGraduation speaker for the Chesapeake Conservation Corps Class of 2017-2018

This week the Trust celebrated the incoming and outgoing Chesapeake Conservation Corps classes with the annual “Passing of the Golden Shovel” ceremony, a focal point of a day of celebration and training held at YMCA’s Camp Letts in Edgewater, Md. At the event, the 38 2018-2019 Corps participants met their host organizations to learn more about their job responsibilities for the upcoming year. The ceremony also served as a graduation for the 42 members of the outgoing Corps class who wrapped up their year of service this month. The day’s guest speakers included Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller, Jr.; Senator John Astle; Maryland Environment Secretary Ben Grumbles; John Quinn, Director of Governmental and External Affairs, BGE; Ernestine White, National Youth Employment Programs Coordinator, National Park Service; and Trust Board Chair Ben Wechsler.

The Chesapeake Conservation Corps is a green jobs program created by the Maryland Legislature to educate and train the next generation of environmental stewards. The program matches young people ages 18-25 with nonprofit and government organizations for paid, one-year terms of service, focused on improving local communities and protecting natural resources.

During their year of service, Chesapeake Conservation Corps members gain valuable on-the-job experience as they work to advance environmental conservation, K-12 education, energy efficiency programs, sustainable agriculture practices, and a host of other environmentally-focused initiatives.

“The Chesapeake Conservation Corps’ impact on our communities and our environment multiplies with each new class of Corps members,” said Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller, Jr., the initiator of the program in 2010. “We have reached a point where members of the Corps’ first classes are now leaders in environmental organizations throughout our region. I am proud of the investment we are making in them and the future of the green economy in our state.”

The program has a consistent track record of placing graduates in full-time positions upon completion of the program, with many Corps members in each graduating class hired directly by their host organizations, often into brand new positions.

“Since its creation, the Chesapeake Conservation Corps has been a launching pad for environmental careers throughout our state,” said Maryland Natural Resources Secretary Mark Belton. “It is vital that we continue to grow our green workforce through programs like this. The work that these young people are undertaking and the issues they are trying to address are critical to the health and future of our environment and natural resources. The department has been fortunate to host a number of bright and talented Corps members over the years. We have seen firsthand that the training they receive is top-notch and their energy and enthusiasm is boundless.”

The program has become more popular with potential host organizations each year since its initiation in 2010 because of the quality of the young people who serve.  Three times as many host organizations seek Corps members than resources can support.  The Corps members’ stipends are supported by the Chesapeake Bay Trust (and the Bay Plate license plate program) and their partners, providing host organizations with added capacity at little added cost.

Partner funders include the State of Maryland, BGE an Exelon Company, and the U.S. National Park Service. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Adkins Arboretum, Maryland Department of Natural Resources, Maryland Department of the Environment, South River Federation, and Maryland Coastal Bays Program also contributed matching funds for the program this year.

“The National Park Service is proud to once again be supporting the Chesapeake Conservation Corps,” said George McDonald, U.S. National Park Service Youth Programs Manager. “These young people are embarking on a truly unique career-building experience that will ultimately benefit all of us as they learn and teach others the benefits of natural and cultural resource conservation.”

“BGE has been a proud supporter of the Chesapeake Conservation Corps for many years because we care about the health of our communities and our natural resources,” said John Quinn of BGE, a key funder of the program.  “We understand the importance of developing leaders who value our natural resources and have the experience and perspective to be good stewards. The Corps program prepares young people to enter the workforce in all sectors: nonprofit, government, and corporate as well.”

During the course of the year, Corps participants work directly with their host organizations, receive extensive job trainings hosted by the Chesapeake Bay Trust, and gain experience in grant writing and project management through a capstone project.

“Continuing the progress that has been made in restoring the health of the Chesapeake depends on educating and training the next generation of environmental leaders,” said Jana Davis, Executive Director of the Chesapeake Bay Trust. “The Chesapeake Conservation Corps prepares young people with the skills and experience that are needed to keep the momentum going.”

The 2018-2019 Chesapeake Conservation Corps class includes the following individuals and their host organizations:

  1. Travis Anthony, National Aquarium, Baltimore City
  2. Michael Bowman, U.S. National Park Service, Anne Arundel County
  3. Kaila Cavanaugh, Accokeek Foundation, Prince George’s County
  4. Emily Castle, Adkins Arboretum, Caroline County
  5. Evan Claggett, Environmental Concern, Talbot County
  6. Megan Davis, Maryland Department of Natural Resources, Maryland Biological Stream Survey, Anne Arundel County
  7. Jennifer Duvall, Patapsco Heritage Greenway, Howard County
  8. Brianna Fragata, Maryland Coastal Bays Program, Worcester County
  9. Leah Franzluebbers, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, Anne Arundel County
  10. Brittany Furlong, Maryland Department of Natural Resources, Maryland Biological Stream Survey, Anne Arundel County
  11. Justin Gallardo, Uptown Metro Ministry Group, Baltimore City
  12. Sarah Grossweiler, Maryland Department of the Environment, Baltimore City
  13. Thomas Heffernan, Living Classrooms Foundation, Baltimore City
  14. Lucy Heller, Alliance for the Chesapeake Bay, Anne Arundel County
  15. Kelly Johnson, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, Anne Arundel County
  16. Andrew Jones, Town of Edmonston, Prince George’s County
  17. Shayna Keller, South River Federation, Anne Arundel County
  18. Jay Kinnaman, Maryland Environmental Service, Anne Arundel County
  19. Alexander Kirchhof, Mayor and City Council of Cumberland, Allegany County
  20. Amy Kochel, Susquehanna Heritage Corporation, Pennsylvania
  21. Connor Liu, The Nature Conservancy, Allegany County
  22. Jamie Mancini, Sultana Education Foundation, Kent County
  23. Rory Maymon, Maryland Department of the Environment , Baltimore City
  24. Syler Merski, Friends of Jefferson Patterson Park and Museum, Calvert County
  25. Jesus Munoz Buenrostro, Southeast Community Development Corporation, Baltimore City
  26. Kelly Peaks, University of Maryland, Environmental Finance Center, Prince George’s County
  27. Rachel Plescha, ShoreRivers, Talbot County
  28. Arianna Russo, Maryland Coastal Bays Program, Worcester County
  29. Marissa Sayers, Central Baltimore Partnership, Baltimore City
  30. Cheyenne Sebold, C&O Canal Trust, Washington County
  31. Dominic Serino, Audubon Maryland-DC, Baltimore City
  32. Justin Shapiro, National Wildlife Federation, Anne Arundel County
  33. Nathaniel Simmons, Adkins Arboretum, Caroline County
  34. Bradley Simpson, Audubon Naturalist Society, Montgomery County
  35. Alexa Stillwell, Chesapeake Bay Foundation, Anne Arundel County
  36. Thomas Urban, Howard County Department of Recreation & Parks, Howard County
  37. Tanisha Washington, Waterfront Partnership of Baltimore, Baltimore City
  38. Olivia Wisner, Maryland Department of Natural Resources, Chesapeake Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve (CBNERR), Anne Arundel County

Now Open! Prince George’s County Stormwater Stewardship Grant Program

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The Prince George’s County Government and the Chesapeake Bay Trust announce the fifth year of our partnership for the Prince George’s Stormwater Stewardship Grant Program. This grant program supports projects that provide community engagement while treating and controlling stormwater. The goal of this program is to improve communities, improve water quality in the County’s waterways, and engage County residents in stormwater solutions.

This year’s program focuses on water quality implementation projects (requests for $50,000 up to $200,000) and tree planting projects (requests for $50,000 up to $150,000).

Please refer to the application package found on the grant program page for additional details and application instructions and requirements. The deadline to apply is September 27, 2018 at 4pm. 

In addition, the Trust would like to thank the grantees shown in the video above for sharing their projects and experiences, and providing insight on the impact that the projects had on their community. More information on each of the grantees highlighted in the video is below.

  • Anacostia Watershed Society collaborates with Prince George’s County Public Schools and other partners for the Treating and Teaching program to install stormwater solutions and outdoor classrooms on school campuses and train the facilities staff to maintain the assets.
  • Central Kenilworth Avenue Revitalization Community Development Corporation developed the Go Green! Plant Trees! program to increase tree canopy in residential neighborhoods by providing native trees to homeowners and educating the community about the value of trees.
  • End Time Harvest Ministries conducted their Wellness Ambassadors Environmental Health Program to engage youth in the community through tree planting projects, stormwater education, and green-job skills programs.
  • Global Health and Education Projects developed the Family Tree Adoption Program to educate the community about the importance of trees and to provide native trees and shrubs to private homeowners in the County.
  • Interfaith Partners for the Chesapeake collaborates with faith-based organizations to provide training and workshops for faith leaders to increase citizen awareness of and engagement in stormwater management and watershed protection actions.
  • Neighborhood Design Center developed the Stormwater Savvy program to help small municipalities, schools, and community organizations create action-oriented design plans that help to improve water quality and increase community engagement with their landscape.

Learn more about these and other projects funded by this grant program on our grant projects page.

20th Annual Treasure the Chesapeake Celebration

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Annual Event Raises Over $110,000 to Support Cleaner, Healthier Watersheds
The Trust’s 20th Annual Treasure the Chesapeake celebration was held on Thursday, May 17, 2018, at the Baltimore Museum of Industry. More than 400 corporations, businesses, and individuals participated in this year’s event, helping to raise over $110,000 in support of the Trust’s work to engage hundreds of thousands of students, citizens, and volunteers in hands-on projects for cleaner, greener, healthier watersheds throughout the region.
Guests were treated to Nanticoke oysters at the oyster bar provided by the Oyster Recovery Partnership; a special beer tasting provided by Brewery Ommegang, a Cooperstown, NY-based craft brewery known for their clean water initiatives; a silent auction with fantastic finds and exciting getaways donated by dozens of local artists and regional businesses; and a thrilling presentation from America’s Cup winner, world-class sailor, broadcaster, and producer, Gary Jobson.
This year’s event was a huge success and could not have been accomplished without the support of our grantees, sponsors, partners, and friends! We surpassed our fundraising goals and we are thrilled to be able to invest those resources in the work of our grantees.
Thank you to those who were able to join us at the event and to those who supported us from afar and in spirit! We are so grateful your continued support!

2018 Treasure the Chesapeake

 

Presented by

OYSTER SPONSORS

Local Nonprofit Organizations Receive Close to $300,000 in Grants for Environmental Projects

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Rockville, Maryland – The Montgomery County Department of Environmental Protection and the Chesapeake Bay Trust announced that $291,000 in grant funding has been awarded to seven organizations to improve water quality and help manage stormwater runoff in Montgomery County. Montgomery County neighborhood groups, faith-based organizations, and nonprofit organizations received support ranging from $6,000 to $77,000.

“The Department of Environmental Protection is committed to improving the water quality of our local streams while contributing to the health and sustainability of our communities,” said Patty Bubar, acting Director of the Department of Environmental Protection. “This grant program fills an important niche towards meeting our mission and we’re thrilled to be able to support and engage these hard-working local groups who share this mission.”

Established in 2014, the initiative supports projects and programs that improve communities and water quality in Montgomery County through public engagement, education, and on-the-ground restoration projects. Project types include public outreach and stewardship projects, such as volunteer-led stream cleanups, stormwater education workshops, environmental education projects and community-based restoration projects, such as rain gardens, rain barrels, tree planting, impervious pavement removal, conservation landscaping, and green roofs.

Funding for these projects is made possible through Montgomery County’s water quality protection charge.  The Chesapeake Bay Trust, a regional grant-maker specializing in engagement of not-for-profit entities in restoration and outreach work, administers the grants for Montgomery County, similar to programs it manages for seven other jurisdictions.

These programs are so important to provide residents and nonprofit groups the tools, resources, and power to be part of the solution and feel like they are improving their communities,” said Jana Davis, executive director of the Chesapeake Bay Trust.  “Completing one’s first project as a nonprofit creates the capacity to do so much more and we’re proud of how many of these groups have grown and become strong grantees in other programs.”

The 2018 Montgomery County Watershed Restoration and Outreach Grant Program awardees include:

Anacostia Riverkeeper, $14,644: To engage Montgomery County Spanish-speaking populations in programs to improve water quality.

Anacostia Riverkeeper, $58,350: For rain gardens and conservation landscape plantings at the Sandy Spring Friends Meeting House.

Audubon Naturalist Society of the Central Atlantic States, Inc., $53,417: For a rain garden at Woodend Nature Sanctuary in Chevy Chase.

Butler Montessori, $58,275: To remove 3,000 square feet of impervious surface and install permeable pavers at Butler Montessori School in Darnestown.

Friends of Sligo Creek, $22,650: For an engineering study, conservation landscaping, dry wells, and engagement of volunteers in the Three Oaks community in Silver Spring.

University of Maryland, Environmental Finance Center, $77,096: To engage county Civic Associations in watershed restoration activities and to hold a stormwater summit in Montgomery County.

Wildlife Habitat Council, $6,568: To engage corporations in the implementation of stormwater and habitat best management practices such as rain gardens, bioretention cells, conservation landscaping, water recapture, and other practices on corporation-owned land.

About the Chesapeake Bay Trust

The Chesapeake Bay Trust (www.cbtrust.org) is a nonprofit grant-making organization established by the Maryland General Assembly dedicated to improving the natural resources of Maryland and the Chesapeake region through environmental education, community engagement, and local watershed restoration. The Trust’s grantees engage hundreds of thousands of individuals annually in projects that have a measurable impact on the waterways and other natural resources of the region. The Trust is supported by the sale of the Treasure the Chesapeake license plate, donations to the Chesapeake Bay and Endangered Species Fund on the Maryland State income tax form, donations from individuals and corporations, and partnerships with private foundations and federal, state, and local governments such as Montgomery County. The Trust has received the highest rating from Charity Navigator for fourteen years: 92 percent of the Trust’s expenditures are directed to its restoration and education programs.

About Montgomery County’s Department of Environmental Protection

The mission of the Montgomery County Department of Environmental Protection is to enhance the quality of life in our community by protecting and improving Montgomery County’s air, water, and land in a sustainable way while fostering smart growth, a thriving economy, and healthy communities.

Trust Kicks Off 2018 with More than $3.7 Million in Grant Awards

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The Trust announced the approval of 164 grants totaling $3,727,047 to enable a wide range of organizations to implement on-the-ground restoration and education projects and programs. Four times each year the Trust’s board of trustees announces its grant approvals which help local nonprofit organizations, local governments, and schools improve water quality and better local communities through a variety of outreach and restoration techniques. In fiscal year 2017, the Chesapeake Bay Trust awarded more than $11 million in grants.

“We are proud to offer grant opportunities to a wide range of organizations, from small homeowner associations and faith-based institutions to large cities, universities, and hospital campuses, to help them further our shared mission of improving our communities and protecting the natural resources of the Chesapeake region,” said Jana Davis, executive director of the Chesapeake Bay Trust.

The grants announced today range from small tree plantings and community outreach initiatives to large-scale restoration and stormwater management projects.

For example, Black Girls Dive Foundation, a nonprofit dedicated to inspiring and empowering girls and young women to engage in aquatic-based recreational and STEM activities, was awarded their first grant from the Trust. The grant will be used to incorporate environmental ecology curriculum into their STREAMS program, which integrates science, technology, engineering, art, and math experiences with SCUBA lessons.

Baltimore Tree Trust, an established environmental nonprofit dedicated to restoring Baltimore’s urban forest, was awarded a grant for their planned collaboration with Volunteering Untapped and Baltimore Trash Talk. Funds will be used to expand their Trees for Public Health program by working with the residents of Baltimore’s Berea neighborhood to “green and clean” their neighborhood and to reforest a portion of the Harris Creek watershed by planting 170 street trees.

The Trust works with many funding partners to pool resources. Partners for these awards included U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, National Fish and Wildlife Foundation, Maryland Department of Natural Resources, Prince George’s County, Montgomery County, City of Baltimore, Charles County, Howard County, Harford County, and numerous private foundations.

About the Awards:

Community-based engagement and on-the-ground restoration work:  Sixty-five grants totaling more than $2.6 million were awarded to support a broad range of projects that engage residents and restore habitat and/or water quality in our region.

Awards were made to: American Farmland Trust, Anacostia Watershed Society, Anne Arundel County, Maryland (2), Associated Catholic Charities, Inc., Audubon Naturalist Society of the Central Atlantic States, Inc., Back Creek Conservancy, Inc., Baltimore County Soil Conservation District, Baltimore Tree Trust, Black Girls Dive Foundation, Inc., Blue Water Baltimore (2), Carroll Soil Conservation District, Charles Soil Conservation District, City of Annapolis, City of Bowie, Civic Works, Inc. (2), Clean Water Fund, Clyburn Arboretum Association, County Commissioners of Caroline County, Delaware Maryland Synod ELCA, Epping Forest Community Association, Frederick County Office of Sustainability and Environmental Resources (OSER), Frederick Soil Conservation District, Friends of the Patapsco Valley Heritage Greenway, Inc., Girl Scouts of Central Maryland, Gunpowder Valley Conservancy (2), Havre de Grace Maritime Museum, Howard County Conservancy, Inc., Howard EcoWorks (2), Interfaith Partners for the Chesapeake (IPC), Kent County Commissioners, Knollwood Improvement Association, McDaniel College, Most Precious Blood Church, Mount Sinai African Methodist Episcopal Church, Park School of Baltimore, Patterson Park Audubon Center, Pickering Creek Audubon Center, Port Tobacco River Conservancy, Potomac Conservancy, Ridge to Reefs, ShoreRivers (3), South River Federation (4), Southeast Community Development Corporation, The 6th Branch, The Church of the Redeemer, Town of Centreville, Town of New Market, and University of Maryland College Park.

Science: The Trust partners with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to support some of the science gaps in bay restoration.  This quarter, two awards totaling $108,000 were made to Tetra Tech, Inc. and Penns Valley Conservation Association.

Capacity Building Initiative: The Trust supports innovative partnerships between traditional natural resources organizations and organizations not traditionally engaged in natural resources as way to reach beyond the choir and broaden the engagement of individuals in watershed restoration.

Twenty-six grants for this type of work were awarded totaling $743,539 to: Anacostia Coordinating Council, Assateague Coastal Trust, Association of Baltimore Area Grantmakers, Baltimoreans United In Leadership Development, Blue Water Baltimore, Capital Area Resource Conservation and Development Council, Inc. (2), Clean Water Fund (2), Comite de Apoyo a los Trabajadores Agricolas – CATA, DC Appleseed, Friends of Kenilworth Aquatic Gardens, Future Harvest – Chesapeake Alliance for Sustainable Agriculture (C.A.S.A.), Groundwork Anacostia River DC, Interfaith Partners for the Chesapeake (IPC), Neighborhood Design Center, Patterson Park Audubon Center, Piedmont Environmental Council, Progressive National Baptist Convention Community Development Corporation, Socially Responsible Agricultural Project, Southeast Community Development Corporation, Surfrider Foundation, TRF Development Partners, Inc., Ward 7 Business Partnership, and Waterkeepers Chesapeake.

Small Grants: For entities just starting out in the environmental realm and for teachers who need just a small amount of resources to get their students outside to experience nature, the Trust also offers small grants up to $5,000.  This quarter, 53 organizations received small grants for a total of $202,007.

For more information on any of these specific grant awards, email Erin Valentine at evalentine@cbtrust.org.